5

votes

High Starch after Healing Insulin Sensitivity

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 28, 2010 at 4:56 PM

Low carb is optimal to improve insulin sensitivity

Does anyone have experience (personal or studies) on higher starch when combined with heavy exercise and a healed metabolism?

I recover and perform better if I potato/yam after intense workouts. But only small amounts. I have experienced no fat gain. I have steadily put on muscle but don't know if protein or glucose is to blame

I'm curious about higher starch intake without sugar(fructose) in active individuals that don't have impaired insulin sensitivity

Edit: having gone higher starch(potatoes) co-inciding with heavy workouts. Ive noticed faster muscle gain and no visible fat gain. I also seem to recover a little faster.

Also a great read:

http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/search?q=potatoes

Medium avatar

(2417)

on June 25, 2012
at 09:20 AM

Before you start calling folks paleotards, perhaps you should check some research about your own statements. Standing Tall: Plains Indians Enjoyed Height, Health Advantage http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/05/010529071125.htm

76f3ead3aa977d876bcf3331d35a36e9

(4620)

on November 22, 2011
at 01:55 AM

u mad bro? u mad

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on January 10, 2011
at 03:52 PM

Very minor iirc.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on January 10, 2011
at 03:33 PM

new Q for you, aegis: when you first started adding starch (sweet pots, etc) to you your regular eating from having been full carnivore did it take your digestion a week or so to adjust? I am loving the sweet potatoes PWO and actually in the evening meal, too but ill admit to some farting. Ive only been doing this for the past six days. Having only eating green leafy veg as a carb for the past six months im hoping its just a minor adjustment and i'll be gas-free after eating the starch. Thanks for the info.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on October 06, 2010
at 12:38 AM

I was full carnivore for a while, while I felt lean, I wasn't at my athletic best. My recovery was decent so I didn't think slot of it... When I ha starch reintroduced I felt heavy at first.. Retained water and felt bloated, until my next workout where I set PRs, I then took a couple days away again tried it again, figured I'd see what extended intake would feel like, after about a week the bloated was gone but not the performance. I still avoid fructose, and I'm still high fat. But I've put on more lean muscle 5-7lbs and my abs are still visible :)

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on October 05, 2010
at 04:30 PM

Stephen, I like this thread and am considering going this route exactly. Right now I'm still on my n=1 all-animal diet but I have no intentions of doing it forever. Can I ask how is your digestion of the one potato sweet potato yam, etc when you consume post workout. And are consuming it 30 minutes after you stop working out? I feel that after eating zero plants for three or so months on now that I maybe can't handle eating a starch load. Any advice or comment? Thanks a bunch, always enjoy your posts.

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on September 29, 2010
at 08:08 PM

Those leangains photos are insane. I just can't imagine eating that much carbohydrate, ever. No matter how much I'm working out.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on September 29, 2010
at 05:05 PM

Small as in 1 potato/yam. Instead of feasting

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on September 29, 2010
at 03:41 PM

Also, have you tried taking it before, like a TKD, or just after?

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on September 29, 2010
at 03:38 PM

That's interesting. How much is a "small" amount?

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on September 29, 2010
at 03:25 AM

My recovery and performance are better, it's health I'm concerned about...

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on September 28, 2010
at 07:55 PM

Ayers says starch is inflammatory IF low muscularity/low activity levels because of blood sugar.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on September 28, 2010
at 07:48 PM

Great point, as starch is great for gut bacteria, a healthy gut would also be very important

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on September 28, 2010
at 07:44 PM

Then I would say you should be good. Being low carb you will be less sensitive to insulin in those muscles that are predominantly running of fat, but it isn't pathological or even likely of any concern. In fact more insulin after a workout is indeed a good thing for your muscles. Just so long as fasting glucose and insulin are good I wouldn't be worried.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on September 28, 2010
at 07:36 PM

Eliminating chronic insulin spikes have been shown to cause resistance I.e. Low carb(non-chronic) helps. What Robb is explaining is yet another pathway. Personally I'm super low omega6 and have been low carb for years now, but recent self experimentation has increased muscle gain and athletic performance by adding small count of potato/yam

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on September 28, 2010
at 05:16 PM

Looking for info besides "Kitavans"

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on September 28, 2010
at 05:14 PM

Forgot to add my lean is on amalyse production, we are designed for starch intake, why produce it if it's not optimal or a heavily source of calories.

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6 Answers

3
Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on September 28, 2010
at 07:13 PM

I say that you should be fine IF your insulin sensitivity is actually under control. Check out Robb Wolf's newest post on insulin resistance and eicosanoids, or you could take a look at the one from wholehealthsource. Also make sure to be getting enough magnesium. If you really go heavy on the fish oil, saturated fat, nutrients and vegetables you will improve your insulin sensitivity and it won't be an issue.

http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2009/05/eicosanoids-fatty-liver-and-insulin.html http://robbwolf.com/2010/09/27/how-to-jump-the-shark-with-fish-oil-and-moderation/ http://robbwolf.com/2010/09/27/how-to-jump-the-shark-with-fish-oil-and-moderation/ http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15223977

Neither starch nor saturated fat causes insulin resistance, only problems with people who have insulin resistance. http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2010/08/saturated-fat-glycemic-index-and.html

Neither low carb or low fat is a solution to insulin sensitivity. The above recommendations are and are all that should really be focused on, whether or not someone feels that low carb is optimal for health and longevity and decides to do it anyway. I usually need starch after workouts to feel my best.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on September 28, 2010
at 07:36 PM

Eliminating chronic insulin spikes have been shown to cause resistance I.e. Low carb(non-chronic) helps. What Robb is explaining is yet another pathway. Personally I'm super low omega6 and have been low carb for years now, but recent self experimentation has increased muscle gain and athletic performance by adding small count of potato/yam

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on September 28, 2010
at 07:44 PM

Then I would say you should be good. Being low carb you will be less sensitive to insulin in those muscles that are predominantly running of fat, but it isn't pathological or even likely of any concern. In fact more insulin after a workout is indeed a good thing for your muscles. Just so long as fasting glucose and insulin are good I wouldn't be worried.

2
2e060a5edde44c1fe77abcf8d3997e01

on September 29, 2010
at 03:18 AM

Bodybuilders and strength athletes actually inject themselves with insulin as a "performance enhancing" drug. Given that this practice is extremely dangerous and can even be fatal, I suspect it must also be effective (or why would they do it?). Eating carbs post workout also causes an insulin spike (although smaller), so I suspect that it might be "performance enhancing" as well. I've recently increased my carbs post workout and feel that it has a very positive effect on my recovery. As to whether it's improving my health...

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on September 29, 2010
at 03:25 AM

My recovery and performance are better, it's health I'm concerned about...

2
21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 28, 2010
at 06:54 PM

Many athletes and fitness enthusiasts eat high starch diets and live to a ripe old age. For example, Clarence Bass, of "Ripped" fame:

http://www.cbass.com/index.html

He's, well, ripped. And he's in his 70s, eating whole grains and starches regularly. Insulin spikes when your cells are full of glucose is one thing, but timing starch around workouts is another thing. Another example is Martin Berkhan of Leangains, who I'm sure you've read. See his roast beef and potato platter here:

http://www.leangains.com/2010/08/intermittent-fasting-meals-part-two.html

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on September 29, 2010
at 08:08 PM

Those leangains photos are insane. I just can't imagine eating that much carbohydrate, ever. No matter how much I'm working out.

1
89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on September 28, 2010
at 07:35 PM

Starch, besides its effects on insulin metabolism could have other detrimental effects. Google Klebsiella and starch. Both Peter at Hyperlipid and Dr. Ayers at Cooling Inflammation talk about it. Interesting...

I tried to increase starches a bit, but have seen my psoriasis flare up again (not that bad though). Now other things could also have caused this, so n=1 is ongoing, from now on it will be avoiding starches and wait and see...

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on September 28, 2010
at 07:55 PM

Ayers says starch is inflammatory IF low muscularity/low activity levels because of blood sugar.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on September 28, 2010
at 07:48 PM

Great point, as starch is great for gut bacteria, a healthy gut would also be very important

0
Medium avatar

on June 25, 2012
at 09:28 AM

Steven, good post. I have been VCL meat and a few greens for 5 months to fix an out of whack metabolism, whatever you wanna call that. Carbs were making me sick. Once in the middle of that, I tried just 50g carbs in sweet potato, PWO, and felt terrible.

Fast forward to last week; I tried leangains. 3x a week Ive been eating super lean beef with 340g of carbs in sweet potatoes (divided over two meals), and just 10g coconut oil added fat. During rest days, I eat the same as I have been; fatty meat and a tad of greens. Hormonal hunger signals didn't return. Seems I go right back into ketosis (but I think the 16/8 fasting schedule plus fasted training helps induce it).

Its just been a week now, and even though I thought I may keel over dead if I ate that much carb at once, nothing bad happened! In fact, after 5 months of lifting glycogen depleted, It felt pretty damn good. My next lift was great. Recovery was great.

Too early to know about body composition changes. I'm going for a leangains cut cycle.

-1
352a72fded8d4381399a2f1422bab13c

on November 22, 2011
at 01:44 AM

All you paleotards are too carb-phobic. You turn insulin and carbohydrates into such a big deal. Why are grains, fruits, and potatoes supposed to be the cause of cancer, obesity, type II diabetes, and such on when people have been cultivating and eating them for 4,000+ years without problems? It's only recently in the past few decades that people started getting sick. Several thousand years ago, people ate grains and roots but were rarely obese. Get that fact straight. Even our paleolithic ancestors ate plenty fruit when they were in season and roots as well.

Here's another fact: All of the larger and stronger civilizations had either grains or potatoes in their diet. Civilizations with almost zero carbs like the inuit or eskimos are small and weak.

But if it makes you feel better, then you can go ahead and wear your paleolithic tarzan-skirts and start running around the place like monkeys.

76f3ead3aa977d876bcf3331d35a36e9

(4620)

on November 22, 2011
at 01:55 AM

u mad bro? u mad

Medium avatar

(2417)

on June 25, 2012
at 09:20 AM

Before you start calling folks paleotards, perhaps you should check some research about your own statements. Standing Tall: Plains Indians Enjoyed Height, Health Advantage http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/05/010529071125.htm

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