1

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dark chocolate and insulin?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 21, 2013 at 7:57 PM

Hey guys, quick answer, does dark chocolate turns up the insuline a lot?

for example, does it turn insuline on as much as potatoes? i'm a dark chocolate addicted, and i wil stop eating it if you say to me that it's dangerous for my insulin.

thanks a lot

Cfe88f41d0f90c6355a58eddbe78c9f8

(868)

on February 21, 2013
at 11:26 PM

I recently switched to 99%. Now everything else tastes too sweet.

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4 Answers

2
3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on February 21, 2013
at 09:41 PM

You can answer this question yourself by purchasing a meter and testing. Test before the chocolate (hopefully at least 2 hours since your last meal or snack, or even better, fasting) and then every 15 minutes for the next few hours. You will see a peak and a drop.

How much of a peak depends on your relative amount of insulin resistance or not. It may not rise very much at all. But what you really want to see is whether it drops significantly below the level it was before you ate the chocolate. That will indicate that you probably had an insulin surge. Then you will know if the chocolate is having any effect on your insulin secretion.

Try the same experiment with something that definitely would spike insulin, like a piece of high glycemic fruit or some high glycemic juice (orange juice for example).

If you are restricting carbs in general, be sure to count the chocolate into your daily allotment of carbs. If you do that and see no changes in weight or episodes of hypoglycemia, then the effect is minimal anyway.

1
Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on February 21, 2013
at 08:10 PM

How dark is your chocolate?

99% dark chocolate usually has no added sugar and just "stabilizers" (which funny enough, might actually be sugar). So 99% or even 100% baker's chocolate is AOK by most people's standards.

The problem is that most people don't actually find true, dark chocolate palatable, and prefer something around 80-90%. Take a look at the dark chocolate bar you are eating, and it will tell you straight away how much sugar is in each serving. For me, I like to see <3g of added sugar per 50g of chocolate. This puts me in the 90% dark chocolate range for preference.

You'll see 60% "dark chocolate" with upwards of 20g of sugar per 50g. I avoid this stuff -- that's almost 3 teaspoons of added sugar (v. about <1/2tsp for 90%).

However, a potato is harder to classify, and I don't even want to compare it to any sort of dessert or candy, but suffice to say potato is a real, whole food. If you are worrying about eating potatoes and still eating dessert, you really need to get your priorities in order.

Good luck!

Cfe88f41d0f90c6355a58eddbe78c9f8

(868)

on February 21, 2013
at 11:26 PM

I recently switched to 99%. Now everything else tastes too sweet.

0
559a1bf85bfe38a0fbbf56377c7278b4

on February 21, 2013
at 11:49 PM

It's easy to test this with a blood glucose meter - takes away the guesswork.

0
7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on February 21, 2013
at 10:33 PM

Janknitz is right. I can tell you that I can eat a dark chocolate bar with about 20g of carbs without the blood sugar going into the danger zone, but I can't tell you whether or not it is causing you a problem.

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