3

votes

Cortisol and insulin

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 28, 2011 at 3:48 PM

If one seeks to reduce cortisol and insulin secretion-especially simultaneously- but seeks to work out intensely and to recuperate through consuming insulinergic substances(eg. carbs, butter) PWO, what can be done to resolve this seeming contradiction? I have been keeping my workouts within 1 hour's length twice daily (strength-training) and doing 30 minutes of walking daily for cardio. Am I jeopardizing my health through cortisol/insulin synergy?

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on May 02, 2011
at 02:48 AM

Vitamin D and testosterone fall in relationship to high cortisol production. When you have a flight or fight situation the body prioritizes life over reproduction

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on May 02, 2011
at 02:46 AM

Vitamin D can be low with high cortisol for two major reasons. One vitamin D activates the T cells via the VDR receptor and in infection or stress situations cortisol is high and uses up D resources. Second way is pregnenolone steal syndrome. Cortisol is made from a sterol backbone as is vitamin D. Cortisol production trumps vitamin D production.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 02, 2011
at 12:08 AM

OPTIMALITY! Does D raise test levels?

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on April 29, 2011
at 02:30 PM

I think the duration is going to depend on the person and how that person had been feed and how well-slept they are. For you, you're going to want to figure out how much time you've got for recovery. I would think that if the recovery time needed for the strength-training you're doing exceeds the time you've alloted, then you're going to stress your system out. This is something that only you can tell by listening to your body. That said, I really think two sessions per day may be too much. Do one longer session per day and give yourself at least 24 hours to recover! Anyone else have thoughts?

03281912f1cb9e4e771a8a83af302e3a

(1204)

on April 29, 2011
at 01:54 PM

What is optimal with a cortisol issue?

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on April 29, 2011
at 12:25 PM

Suffice yes....but are you interested in being suffifiecent or optimal?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 28, 2011
at 10:43 PM

Thanks for the feedback Gilliebean et.al. I am wondering if you might know the duration of intenseive strength-training that would best work to minimize cortisol/optimize testosterone levels. I am keeping carbs around 150 grams/day max. concentrated after my two workout sessions/day. I am attempting to develope skill for olympic lifting/powerlifting and have been putting around 1 hour for the first, 30 min+ for the second session.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 28, 2011
at 10:39 PM

Carb intake has definitely improved energy levels/diminishment of fatigue(overall body system). I am now doing two sessions of power/olympic-style lifting per day and 1 30 minute walk---no exhaustion on 7 hours sleep and 3500 max. kcal.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 28, 2011
at 10:37 PM

1 tbsp cod liver oil 1 hour sunlight on skin(2 periods per day) 4+ synthetic vit d. tabs 2 per time. Would this suffice? I think the D raises testosterone levels; it increases fellings of 'drive'.

Cf626d3fba66c18297b3f1116a920e58

(3417)

on April 28, 2011
at 09:04 PM

Good to know, I'd never heard this.

Cf626d3fba66c18297b3f1116a920e58

(3417)

on April 28, 2011
at 09:03 PM

Not much to add to that answer except be sure to manage your stress levels and keep a cool-head throughout the day. Keep out of fight-or-flight. That spikes cortisol which leads to insulin sensitivity if chronically high.

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on April 28, 2011
at 04:33 PM

Thanks Todd! :)

50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on April 28, 2011
at 04:14 PM

Great answer, Gilliebean :)

  • 77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

    asked by

    (78467)
  • Views
    2.3K
  • Last Activity
    1518D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

3 Answers

4
A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on April 28, 2011
at 03:57 PM

I suggest:

  1. Getting to bed on time (or earlier than normal) and get enough sleep.
  2. Doing your workouts earlier in the day (as soon as you wake up, ideally).
  3. Get about 1-3 rest days per week and go very low-carb on those rest days.
  4. On workout days, only eat your carbs PWO and not before or way later.

By doing this you will make strides towards decreasing cortisol (by getting sleep and giving yourself a break from high intensity training) and you will cycle your insulin secretion (by giving yourself a few days without carbs (ideally you're fat-adapted and will not snack on those days, getting you into mild ketosis for a little while). Also, working out earlier in the day will help get your daily hormone cycling in gear for better sleep which helps to reduce cortisol.

Hope this helps!

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on April 28, 2011
at 04:33 PM

Thanks Todd! :)

Cf626d3fba66c18297b3f1116a920e58

(3417)

on April 28, 2011
at 09:03 PM

Not much to add to that answer except be sure to manage your stress levels and keep a cool-head throughout the day. Keep out of fight-or-flight. That spikes cortisol which leads to insulin sensitivity if chronically high.

50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on April 28, 2011
at 04:14 PM

Great answer, Gilliebean :)

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 28, 2011
at 10:43 PM

Thanks for the feedback Gilliebean et.al. I am wondering if you might know the duration of intenseive strength-training that would best work to minimize cortisol/optimize testosterone levels. I am keeping carbs around 150 grams/day max. concentrated after my two workout sessions/day. I am attempting to develope skill for olympic lifting/powerlifting and have been putting around 1 hour for the first, 30 min+ for the second session.

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on April 29, 2011
at 02:30 PM

I think the duration is going to depend on the person and how that person had been feed and how well-slept they are. For you, you're going to want to figure out how much time you've got for recovery. I would think that if the recovery time needed for the strength-training you're doing exceeds the time you've alloted, then you're going to stress your system out. This is something that only you can tell by listening to your body. That said, I really think two sessions per day may be too much. Do one longer session per day and give yourself at least 24 hours to recover! Anyone else have thoughts?

3
Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on April 28, 2011
at 08:44 PM

Point I'd like to make here......low vitamin D levels are seen with high cortisol levels. You must supplement with d if your cortisol is high from any cause

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 28, 2011
at 10:37 PM

1 tbsp cod liver oil 1 hour sunlight on skin(2 periods per day) 4+ synthetic vit d. tabs 2 per time. Would this suffice? I think the D raises testosterone levels; it increases fellings of 'drive'.

Cf626d3fba66c18297b3f1116a920e58

(3417)

on April 28, 2011
at 09:04 PM

Good to know, I'd never heard this.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 02, 2011
at 12:08 AM

OPTIMALITY! Does D raise test levels?

03281912f1cb9e4e771a8a83af302e3a

(1204)

on April 29, 2011
at 01:54 PM

What is optimal with a cortisol issue?

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on April 29, 2011
at 12:25 PM

Suffice yes....but are you interested in being suffifiecent or optimal?

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on May 02, 2011
at 02:48 AM

Vitamin D and testosterone fall in relationship to high cortisol production. When you have a flight or fight situation the body prioritizes life over reproduction

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on May 02, 2011
at 02:46 AM

Vitamin D can be low with high cortisol for two major reasons. One vitamin D activates the T cells via the VDR receptor and in infection or stress situations cortisol is high and uses up D resources. Second way is pregnenolone steal syndrome. Cortisol is made from a sterol backbone as is vitamin D. Cortisol production trumps vitamin D production.

1
22212e9ba2a041e6da6c963d4d41615a

(5773)

on April 28, 2011
at 08:55 PM

I ran into the same issue. I took 2 weeks off on intense exercise and stuck to brisk walking a few times a week. Then I slowly ramped up my exercising. I still find I need to take at least 3 days off a week, usually some light walking. I also increased my total carbohydrate intake to at least 100 grams a day. Obviously sleep is a big one, but you will get better sleep when you fix your cortisol issues.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 28, 2011
at 10:39 PM

Carb intake has definitely improved energy levels/diminishment of fatigue(overall body system). I am now doing two sessions of power/olympic-style lifting per day and 1 30 minute walk---no exhaustion on 7 hours sleep and 3500 max. kcal.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!