0

votes

Can you eliminate insulin resistant belly fat by injecting it with insulin?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 20, 2011 at 8:08 PM

Would injecting insulin into insulin resistant fat help eliminate it?

425aa4bfb79556ed50ea693c3edd7e13

(609)

on June 21, 2011
at 01:36 AM

How would he know he has "insulin resistant belly fat"? How would adding insulin treat it when the action of insulin is to increase fat storage?

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on June 20, 2011
at 11:37 PM

I think there must be some confusion about the question. The OP is asking about "insulin resistant" belly fat, and treating it with insulin injections. He's not asking about treating type two DM.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on June 20, 2011
at 11:11 PM

you would be shocked at what goes on out there.

425aa4bfb79556ed50ea693c3edd7e13

(609)

on June 20, 2011
at 09:51 PM

100% rank nonsense.

425aa4bfb79556ed50ea693c3edd7e13

(609)

on June 20, 2011
at 09:51 PM

Yes, upvoted for noting that fat tissue is often the last thing to become insulin resistance. However, be careful -- it is insulin signaling that the tissue is responding to in order to shift the balance of storage/release in the first place that causes the increased deposition. But it has little to do with "sweeping up sugar" and everything to do with reducing the ingress/egress at the lipocytes; lipocytes are not responsible for storing glucose directly.

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on June 20, 2011
at 09:07 PM

Doctors treat belly fat by injecting it with insulin? I've never heard of that...

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4 Answers

7
510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20888)

on June 20, 2011
at 08:53 PM

No, I think you're misunderstanding insulin resistance.

First, the role of insulin: Insulin (very simply) is just a signal to tell your liver, fat, muscles to pickup sugar, fat, nutrients and store them. Think of it this way. Your pancreas has a little meter in it that measures how much sugar is sitting in your blood. When it sees too much sugar he yells "Hey you guys, start storing that sugar". Your fat cells hear that message and start storing the sugar as fat, your muscle cells hear that signal and start storing glycogen, your liver hears that signal and starts doing whatever it is that the liver does.

Now, what does insulin resistance mean? Insulin resistance is being "resistant" to the signal. That is your pancreas is still yelling "hey you guys, start storing that sugar" but SOME of your cells (probably your muscles and liver) have thier fingers in thier ears and aren't hearing the message. The sugar meter in your pancreas doesn't go down because no one is listening, so it freaks out and starts screaming louder (more insulin). And now the muscles and liver hear that signal and start doing their job.

So insulin resistance is not hearing the insulin, not the lack of insulin. It's acutually the other way around, there's too much insulin around. The trouble is that not everything becomes insulin resistant at the same rate. While your muscles and liver may be ignoring insulin, your fat is probably still listening to it and shoveling the sugar in there. That's why there's fat gain during insulin resistance.

So by injecting insulin near fat, you're just going to tell it to suck up even more sugar and turn it into fat, making the problem worse.

Here's a quick thing I wrote about insulin resistance a while ago: https://sites.google.com/site/themikelinks/home/what-s-up-with-insulin-resistance

425aa4bfb79556ed50ea693c3edd7e13

(609)

on June 20, 2011
at 09:51 PM

Yes, upvoted for noting that fat tissue is often the last thing to become insulin resistance. However, be careful -- it is insulin signaling that the tissue is responding to in order to shift the balance of storage/release in the first place that causes the increased deposition. But it has little to do with "sweeping up sugar" and everything to do with reducing the ingress/egress at the lipocytes; lipocytes are not responsible for storing glucose directly.

3
7c1110b7fad797f38894545d1dbd4a9d

(100)

on June 21, 2011
at 06:41 AM

Unless if you are insulin dependent and have an insulin Rx from a doctor, injecting insulin into any part of your body can cause a dangerous drastic drop in blood sugar that can be deadly! This can literally put you into a coma, so please do not inject insulin if it is not prescribed for you. If you do have an insulin prescription, you are likely instructed to give subcutaneous injections into the tummy or the backs of the arms. The only effect on fat deposits near the injection site may be something called lipodystrophy which is dimpling of fat around the injection site or lipohypertrophy, which is a build up a fatty tissue in an area where routine injections occur. The insulin injections won't contribute to weight loss or fat loss, the insulin simply enables the cells to uptake sugar that is present in the bloodstream. Your best bet for reducing fat is to avoid the sugars and carbs that cause insulin levels to spike in the first place!

3
3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on June 20, 2011
at 08:37 PM

When Type I diabetics inject insulin into various body parts, over the years those body parts can build up pretty big deposits of fat, a phenomenon called lipohypertrophy. I'm not sure why the result would be different in someone who's IR.

0
Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on June 20, 2011
at 08:46 PM

That is how some doctors treat it today as crazy as it sounds. I say forget treating type two DM just eradicate it completely.

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on June 20, 2011
at 09:07 PM

Doctors treat belly fat by injecting it with insulin? I've never heard of that...

425aa4bfb79556ed50ea693c3edd7e13

(609)

on June 20, 2011
at 09:51 PM

100% rank nonsense.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on June 20, 2011
at 11:11 PM

you would be shocked at what goes on out there.

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on June 20, 2011
at 11:37 PM

I think there must be some confusion about the question. The OP is asking about "insulin resistant" belly fat, and treating it with insulin injections. He's not asking about treating type two DM.

425aa4bfb79556ed50ea693c3edd7e13

(609)

on June 21, 2011
at 01:36 AM

How would he know he has "insulin resistant belly fat"? How would adding insulin treat it when the action of insulin is to increase fat storage?

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