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How closely related are leptin and insuling resistance?

Commented on August 19, 2013
Created August 15, 2013 at 10:57 AM

Hi. I have recently seen my leptin resistance go away as my appetite has normalised (first time in my life). I'm really enjoying being free from the constant hunger and worry about food. What I wanted to know is if anyone knows how closely leptin and insulin resistance are linked. If my leptin resistance is going, does that mean my insulin resistance is also going?

048dd52752c45129c1212bfffb37ca72

(3150)

on August 19, 2013
at 06:13 AM

If you have still trouble at night, phosphatidylserine seems to work pretty well for lowering cortisol at night, a dinner rich in tryptophan may help also (cottage cheese, spinach, tuna or chicken, hot milk...). HS-CRP is a protein segregated from the liver when there's inflamation so it's a good marker to see how are you inflammation-wise. For what you exposed it seems that you may have some leptin resistance but frankly I'm not sure, I'm not a doc so I'd better not emit this kind of judgements through the net. But the previous advice might help at least IMHO.

048dd52752c45129c1212bfffb37ca72

(3150)

on August 19, 2013
at 06:12 AM

If you have still trouble at night, phosphatidylserine seems to work pretty well for lowering cortisol at night, a dinner rich in tryptophan may help also (cottage cheese, spinach, tuna or chicken, hot milk...). HS-CRP is a protein segregated from the liver when there's inflamation so it's a good marker to see how are you inflammation-wise. For what you exposed it seems that you may have some leptin resistance but frankly I'm sure, I'm not a doc so I'd better not emit this kind of judgements through the net. But the previous advice might help at least IMHO.

048dd52752c45129c1212bfffb37ca72

(3150)

on August 19, 2013
at 06:09 AM

For the high cortisol at night I'd try first the natural approaches: try to eat 3 to 4h before bed time, turn down all lights (including LCD scree, mobile phone...) and try to relax, some meditation music can help, oxitocyn release also... aim to sleep between 7.5 to 8.5h if possible and have a huge protein breakfast and look at the morning sun for a while. With time, this is supposed to set your circadian rythms so you have lower cortisol at night. Worked well for me to turn me a morning person, been a night owl before.

458b7bac46cb9d6110245305ce8fae44

(88)

on August 16, 2013
at 06:26 PM

I recently had my blood work done, I have normal DHEA, Vit D, and my lipids are all fine, the only problems I have are that I have a night-time cortisol spike that is unnaturally high, and my Testosterone is phenomenally low. Also, my digestion is fine except that the tests showed I am not breaking down plant fibers as well as I should. I'm taking enzymes and betaine HCL to help with that, and I'm on TRT for the testosterone(BTW all other sex hormones were normal) What is HS-CRP, and given what I just said, is it likely that I have leptin resistance?

048dd52752c45129c1212bfffb37ca72

(3150)

on August 15, 2013
at 09:44 PM

And seems that being leptin resistant and not overweight at the same time is indeed possible, anorexia comes to mind, it seems to be another leptin issue on the other spectrum of the weight scale.

048dd52752c45129c1212bfffb37ca72

(3150)

on August 15, 2013
at 09:41 PM

Bad body composition might point to bad hormonal balance, but only way to tell this, have bloodwork done to asses sex hormone levels, salivary cortisol and DHEA could be of help here, as well as Vitamin D, lipid panel and HS-CRP. With this data you can try to look for your particular issue, there's no other way to tell. Sleep and digestion also speak a lot of your current status and might correlate well. Why? because bad hormonal profile and bad sleep and digestion go hand in hand.

458b7bac46cb9d6110245305ce8fae44

(88)

on August 15, 2013
at 08:59 PM

What could cause leptin resistence in someone who is not overweight or obese? For example, I notice that I carry virtually no subcutaneous fat, but do have visceral fat, and my relevant body composition has steadily been getting worse ever since I began my venture into paleo. I do work out 4-6 times a week, doing weight training and HIIT, and I kept my carbohydrate amount between 100 and 150 grams total. Could my decreased body composition be because of a lack of carbohydrate, resulting in screwed up leptin sensitivity? If so, how do I come back from that?

C45d7e96acd83d3a6f58193dbc140e86

on August 15, 2013
at 01:15 PM

Very solid answer. I am reading "Fat Chance" By Dr. Robert Lustig and he describes it in a very similar way.

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048dd52752c45129c1212bfffb37ca72

on August 15, 2013
at 11:25 AM

As far as I know (no doc here, just an educated layperson, based on Dr Kruse ideas and some others), it seems that leptin resistance precedes insulin resistance. Leptin receptors at the hypothalamuns account for the body status of energy. If this sensors do not work well, bad signaling occurs that might lead to fat storage with time, fat also develops more leptin hormone, so more leptin secretion from fat, that signals leptin stronger, that leads to the leptin receptors to become less and less sensitive over time... so more chaos detecting how much energy your body has.

Then your patterns for food seeking behave in the wrong way, you might start to need to eat more and more food and most probably the worst stuff, that coupled with gut damage from the bad dietary choices and high GI carbs that raise blood sugar constantly so insulin is released in huge quantities on a constant fashion that leads to more fat storage and eventually to metabolic syndrome as the gut and the liver build up more and more damage. All this paired with omega 6 PUFA's, gut permeability that allow for proteins to leak and cause immune reactions, so more body circulating levels of cytokines that trigger a lot of inflammation that makes things worse over the time, leading to more chaos at the hypothalamus, liver and gut and other organs sensitive to the inflammation... this inflammation might also raise cortisol a lot which breaks down the normal thyroid and hormonal cascade via the pregnenolone stealth syndrome.. really all the organs and endocrine, digestive system and the brain are pretty much tied toghether in the obesity disease.

It seems that as you regain the leptin sensitivity by trying to revert the previous chaos, insulin sensitivity also raises, the most important mechanisms are stabilizing blood glucose, dieting, so you start getting rid of fat, especially visceral fat, that has a lot of that inflammatory cytokines that lead to general body inflammation that block leptin receptors, if you revert your weight to normal and lower your inflammation and you support the liver, it seems that the brain can start to count back on energy status better and thus T3 production and sex hormones can improve and start seeing overall improvement in all aspects.

But, if you have been so messed up that you destroyed almost all your beta-cells that secrete insulin.. then you might not be able to revert the situation, but it's most likely that you are not so far yet, so I'd say, yep, you can.

I know that the explanation is very messy, that's a general picture wrote down fast, hopefully someone might give you a more well formulated answer :)

048dd52752c45129c1212bfffb37ca72

(3150)

on August 15, 2013
at 09:41 PM

Bad body composition might point to bad hormonal balance, but only way to tell this, have bloodwork done to asses sex hormone levels, salivary cortisol and DHEA could be of help here, as well as Vitamin D, lipid panel and HS-CRP. With this data you can try to look for your particular issue, there's no other way to tell. Sleep and digestion also speak a lot of your current status and might correlate well. Why? because bad hormonal profile and bad sleep and digestion go hand in hand.

C45d7e96acd83d3a6f58193dbc140e86

on August 15, 2013
at 01:15 PM

Very solid answer. I am reading "Fat Chance" By Dr. Robert Lustig and he describes it in a very similar way.

048dd52752c45129c1212bfffb37ca72

(3150)

on August 19, 2013
at 06:09 AM

For the high cortisol at night I'd try first the natural approaches: try to eat 3 to 4h before bed time, turn down all lights (including LCD scree, mobile phone...) and try to relax, some meditation music can help, oxitocyn release also... aim to sleep between 7.5 to 8.5h if possible and have a huge protein breakfast and look at the morning sun for a while. With time, this is supposed to set your circadian rythms so you have lower cortisol at night. Worked well for me to turn me a morning person, been a night owl before.

458b7bac46cb9d6110245305ce8fae44

(88)

on August 15, 2013
at 08:59 PM

What could cause leptin resistence in someone who is not overweight or obese? For example, I notice that I carry virtually no subcutaneous fat, but do have visceral fat, and my relevant body composition has steadily been getting worse ever since I began my venture into paleo. I do work out 4-6 times a week, doing weight training and HIIT, and I kept my carbohydrate amount between 100 and 150 grams total. Could my decreased body composition be because of a lack of carbohydrate, resulting in screwed up leptin sensitivity? If so, how do I come back from that?

048dd52752c45129c1212bfffb37ca72

(3150)

on August 19, 2013
at 06:12 AM

If you have still trouble at night, phosphatidylserine seems to work pretty well for lowering cortisol at night, a dinner rich in tryptophan may help also (cottage cheese, spinach, tuna or chicken, hot milk...). HS-CRP is a protein segregated from the liver when there's inflamation so it's a good marker to see how are you inflammation-wise. For what you exposed it seems that you may have some leptin resistance but frankly I'm sure, I'm not a doc so I'd better not emit this kind of judgements through the net. But the previous advice might help at least IMHO.

048dd52752c45129c1212bfffb37ca72

(3150)

on August 15, 2013
at 09:44 PM

And seems that being leptin resistant and not overweight at the same time is indeed possible, anorexia comes to mind, it seems to be another leptin issue on the other spectrum of the weight scale.

458b7bac46cb9d6110245305ce8fae44

(88)

on August 16, 2013
at 06:26 PM

I recently had my blood work done, I have normal DHEA, Vit D, and my lipids are all fine, the only problems I have are that I have a night-time cortisol spike that is unnaturally high, and my Testosterone is phenomenally low. Also, my digestion is fine except that the tests showed I am not breaking down plant fibers as well as I should. I'm taking enzymes and betaine HCL to help with that, and I'm on TRT for the testosterone(BTW all other sex hormones were normal) What is HS-CRP, and given what I just said, is it likely that I have leptin resistance?

048dd52752c45129c1212bfffb37ca72

(3150)

on August 19, 2013
at 06:13 AM

If you have still trouble at night, phosphatidylserine seems to work pretty well for lowering cortisol at night, a dinner rich in tryptophan may help also (cottage cheese, spinach, tuna or chicken, hot milk...). HS-CRP is a protein segregated from the liver when there's inflamation so it's a good marker to see how are you inflammation-wise. For what you exposed it seems that you may have some leptin resistance but frankly I'm not sure, I'm not a doc so I'd better not emit this kind of judgements through the net. But the previous advice might help at least IMHO.

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