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Where is a place to get insects as food in the Northwest (Seattle, WA)?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 12, 2010 at 11:25 PM

One food I've never tried before is insects. It seems like in the rest of the world, they are delicacies.

I'm just wondering, are there any good places to buy prepared insects around Seattle, or any websites anyone can recommend?

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on June 28, 2013
at 12:54 AM

Full Tilt Ice Cream has grasshopper ice cream sometimes too.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on December 16, 2010
at 11:01 PM

Okay, it wasn't a really good answer - but it made me laugh!

Af842c68e3d07fa0e35b4274f3acaeec

on December 14, 2010
at 08:18 PM

This is actually the video that got me thinking about it!

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 13, 2010
at 03:16 AM

I just found an article saying that scorpions are eaten in China, but only after the stinger/poison sac is removed. Wish I knew that when I caught one in the bathtub that took a shower with me!

Af842c68e3d07fa0e35b4274f3acaeec

on December 13, 2010
at 12:59 AM

Like I said - "prepared insects". 1. Insects often eat poisonous plants and store those toxins in their bodies. 2. Some insects produce toxic chemicals themselves. I don't know which insects are safe to eat. 3. I live in the middle of a city. Please think about your answer and ask yourself if it's useful before you post. This is about as useful as telling someone to go out and eat plants in the wild, and could easily get someone sick.

Af842c68e3d07fa0e35b4274f3acaeec

on December 13, 2010
at 12:57 AM

Like I said - "prepared insects". 1. Insects often eat poisonous plants and store those toxins in their bodies. 2. Some insects produce toxic chemicals themselves. 3. I live in the middle of a city. Please think about your answer and ask yourself if it's useful before you post. This is about as useful as telling someone to go out and eat plants in the wild, and could easily get someone sick.

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8 Answers

3
1471beca8e3adff4ae2f89d10e5f7acb

on December 13, 2010
at 08:12 PM

You can go to your local bait shop for crickets, but they are a little bit more difficult to prepare for the newbie entomophage.

Mealworms are available from pet stores and Wild Birds Unlimited, and are much easier to handle and keep alive. When you're ready to eat them, just rinse them off and dry them with a towel, and stick them in the freezer for 10 minutes to stun them, and then boil them for a minute to kill them. I've also eaten them still alive, but it's kind of an acquired taste and more of something you do on a dare.

They taste pretty nutty and earthy, so you can pan-fry them in a little butter or coconut oil and then adding spices. Also nice roasted and seasoned like you would almonds.

3
Eed1118c6216954cdf17e07530eeb2fb

on December 13, 2010
at 12:53 AM

on or under the ground

Af842c68e3d07fa0e35b4274f3acaeec

on December 13, 2010
at 12:57 AM

Like I said - "prepared insects". 1. Insects often eat poisonous plants and store those toxins in their bodies. 2. Some insects produce toxic chemicals themselves. 3. I live in the middle of a city. Please think about your answer and ask yourself if it's useful before you post. This is about as useful as telling someone to go out and eat plants in the wild, and could easily get someone sick.

Af842c68e3d07fa0e35b4274f3acaeec

on December 13, 2010
at 12:59 AM

Like I said - "prepared insects". 1. Insects often eat poisonous plants and store those toxins in their bodies. 2. Some insects produce toxic chemicals themselves. I don't know which insects are safe to eat. 3. I live in the middle of a city. Please think about your answer and ask yourself if it's useful before you post. This is about as useful as telling someone to go out and eat plants in the wild, and could easily get someone sick.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on December 16, 2010
at 11:01 PM

Okay, it wasn't a really good answer - but it made me laugh!

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 13, 2010
at 03:16 AM

I just found an article saying that scorpions are eaten in China, but only after the stinger/poison sac is removed. Wish I knew that when I caught one in the bathtub that took a shower with me!

2
33b6c516904a967ef8ecb30f1dbd8cf2

(7073)

on December 13, 2010
at 04:57 PM

I would start off in the China Town/International district of Seattle. When I lived in China, it was possible to eat all kinds of grubs and insects and they turned up in the most unusual places; there is some kind of insect paste that is quite popular inside dim sum, but I do not know what it is called. Best bet would be to ask around in restaurants and be prepared to hunt around for a while before you find what you want - you'll find it by word of mouth rather than by anything labelled and out on display. Other Asian cuisine such as Malaysian or Indonesian may provide fruitful.

good luck.

1
016f952edc37aca845a991f30004befc

on June 27, 2013
at 10:48 PM

Poquitos on Capitol Hill serves "chapulines," or toasted grasshoppers in chili-lime salt. They serve them in a tiny cup for under $2, and they aren't too bad. Eating them was my first time (knowingly) eating insects of any kind, so I don't have anything to compare them to, but the flavor didn't make me want to go back to the restaurant just for them (I love their other food and how they source it). I wonder if there are some other recipes that would compliment their flavor better, and I definitely want to make my own someday.

The chapulines are listed on either the lunch or dinner menu under "sides:" http://www.vivapoquitos.com/Poquitos/Menu.html

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on June 28, 2013
at 12:54 AM

Full Tilt Ice Cream has grasshopper ice cream sometimes too.

1
95601768ec9cb75cc3a9cbcd2271ed14

(2206)

on December 14, 2010
at 09:28 PM

BTW--it appears that the Seattle Public Library has this book which has some recipes, flavor descriptions and resource suggestions. I've never read it, but it looks like it could be a nice book to flip through to get some preparation ideas once you get the buggies. I wish my library had it.

0
537001f30670e73eb0ac45779af649a5

on February 10, 2012
at 02:12 PM

land bugs arent a good source of omega 3, unless they are grasshoppers

http://ukpmc.ac.uk/abstract/AGR/IND43827641/reload=0;jsessionid=JfTVTzpFUZBIeyzsYjzZ.110

0
A089b683ee0498f2b21b7edfa300e405

on December 13, 2010
at 03:29 AM

Here is a TED talk that will interest everyone on this subject

http://www.ted.com/talks/marcel_dicke_why_not_eat_insects.html

Af842c68e3d07fa0e35b4274f3acaeec

on December 14, 2010
at 08:18 PM

This is actually the video that got me thinking about it!

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 13, 2010
at 03:14 AM

When I was in school there was a fad to eat bugs and various types were available- chocolate covered ants and deep-fried grasshoppers for example. I remember trying a deep-fried grasshopper donated by an elementary school teacher and discovering it wasn't quite as bad as I thought it would be.

Here in Mexico we came across a stand with deep-fried bugs last winter and took some home to gross out our grandchildren, but not before trying one again myself. I also watched a TV cooking show that showed a Mexican dish with bugs (paper wasps?) used as the base of a sauce.

They are a good protein source as this website points out http://www.food-insects.com/Insects%20as%20Human%20Food.htm

Unfortunately I think they may be hard to source since they are not widely accepted in the US or Canada as food.

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