1

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Manipulating exercise frequency as a tool to stay youthful

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 16, 2012 at 9:03 AM

Hey all,

20 yr old male here, Paleo lifestyle'er (if such a thing exists). Over the last few years of my training I have experimented with frequency, intensity and other variables regarding exercise. I have worked out once a week all the way up to several times in a day.

I'm really interested in ageing biology, and particularly, how ageing can be delayed, reversed... All that jazz: the idea that we have some say over the numbers that reflect our biological age.

As a guy who wants to retain his youth and other goals are mainly related to promoting health, I wonder if anyone can share some insight onto any or the following questions:

1 is it possible to accelerate ageing by working out more than above a certain threshold? I know this sounds weird at first, but... From an ageing point of view, is pushing through a workout while still inflamed from the last one going to cause a bit more cellular havoc and damage than if one was fully rested? Might sound like an obvious yes to that, but then there is the element of the body's adaptation to frequent training - being more able to deal with this extra stress by training more and being fitter. I wonder if it's possible to live life in the "post workout inflammation" state and, if over several years, this could accelerate things going wrong?

2 I'm curious as to the frequency of resistance training workouts people like to do hear. At the moment, I'm working out just Mondays and Thursdays, 2 40-minute full body sessions. I walk about 40 mins every day too.

Thanks. Sorry if this post is badly worded or confusing. I have searched the literature but not found much of relevance to this post.

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on November 08, 2012
at 01:25 AM

Yes, an operation or two later and some indefinite aspirin, and here I am. Could've been a whole lot worse though. Just highgliths for me how we can go along in life without necessary knowing what predispositions we have that could be triggered..

Ef777978cfeb8fbdd18d75c4f6c4cb23

(1297)

on November 05, 2012
at 02:17 PM

Nasty & presumably dangerous.

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on November 05, 2012
at 01:54 PM

I agree with the structural limitations. Until I did handstnd pushups and chinups for a while I didn't know that I had a narroe gap between collar bone and first rib. Cue vein pinching and a blood clot ;)

06ca9c524c28bc3fba95d4d90f8f43c6

on October 16, 2012
at 03:06 PM

+1. Once stem cells are gone, they are gone. Research into the length of teleomeres is really a hot topic and measuring this length can give a "biological age" of a person.

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on October 16, 2012
at 02:44 PM

Yes, humans are not meant to do all that much exercise. We evolved to do short bursts of intense exercise (climbing up a tree, hauling water, chasing an animal, wild primal sex, etc.)

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2 Answers

best answer

0
Ef777978cfeb8fbdd18d75c4f6c4cb23

on October 16, 2012
at 02:18 PM

I think that the more intense the workout the more necessary it is to recover fully from it. So, obviously, you can go for a walk every day (assuming one is not morbidly obese), but it may take up to a week to recover from a session of lifting heavy things to failure.

If you train and you're not recovered sufficiently long term damage will occur, what you might call wear and tear. And this is not good for longevity/quality of life.

Also there are a lot of people out there (& I used to be one of them) who have significant structural weaknesses that need to be rectified before engaging in serious and regular physical activity. Lots of people who experience back pain would be better off visiting an osteopath/chiropractor than pushing themselves through the next workout in my opinion.

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on November 05, 2012
at 01:54 PM

I agree with the structural limitations. Until I did handstnd pushups and chinups for a while I didn't know that I had a narroe gap between collar bone and first rib. Cue vein pinching and a blood clot ;)

Ef777978cfeb8fbdd18d75c4f6c4cb23

(1297)

on November 05, 2012
at 02:17 PM

Nasty & presumably dangerous.

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on November 08, 2012
at 01:25 AM

Yes, an operation or two later and some indefinite aspirin, and here I am. Could've been a whole lot worse though. Just highgliths for me how we can go along in life without necessary knowing what predispositions we have that could be triggered..

best answer

1
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on October 16, 2012
at 02:24 PM

Absolutely. Working out too often, too hard is a very large chronic stress on the system. For example, Art De Vany mentioned that chronic cardio can deplete our stem cells. Check out Body by Science and Art's DVD's and book for some of the better ways to work out.

06ca9c524c28bc3fba95d4d90f8f43c6

on October 16, 2012
at 03:06 PM

+1. Once stem cells are gone, they are gone. Research into the length of teleomeres is really a hot topic and measuring this length can give a "biological age" of a person.

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