1

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Is the saturated fat from grain fed animals really any better than vegetable/seed oils?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 19, 2011 at 2:35 PM

The saturated fats in farm raised fish and grain fed animals release pro-inflammation compounds, as do seed and vegetable oils. It seems to me if you can't find or afford grass fed or wild animal meats you should get the leanest cuts possible or trim the fat off. Anyone have any in site into this?

4bf5827bfb7df85c5b4b485db0945e64

(1386)

on April 26, 2011
at 04:01 PM

Anyway, what do you think, Mark? Do you have a different insight or perspective on the paper?

4bf5827bfb7df85c5b4b485db0945e64

(1386)

on April 26, 2011
at 04:01 PM

I would like to see the exact procedures in the experiment, similar to Jack's concerns with confounding factors. 14 people is a very small study size, especially if a portion of them were the controls (which I'm assuming there were). So maybe 4 people saturated fat, 4 people PUFA, and 4 people controls? I'd want to see exactly what they were eating. They use this statement, "these findings highlight novel mechanisms by which different dietary fatty acids may influence key atherogenic processes", but what exactly are the mechanisms? This study doesn't change my stance on the lipid hypothesis.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18472)

on April 19, 2011
at 08:02 PM

Who were these 14 people? How was their health? What did they eat for the study? What were the sources of sat fats and polys? It's extremely unlikely that eating sat fat caused inflammation in these people and eating poly was anti-inflammatory.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18472)

on April 19, 2011
at 08:00 PM

Yep. It makes sense for you to have this question after reading that report, but eating saturated fats does not promote inflammation. I will add an additional comment below your answer.

535633b57c4a4940d1e913e7a12ee791

(1013)

on April 19, 2011
at 06:07 PM

@ Jack - I made the statement due to the study I read and posted below. I should have added that to my original post. Maybe I am drawing the wrong conclusion, thus the question.

535633b57c4a4940d1e913e7a12ee791

(1013)

on April 19, 2011
at 06:02 PM

Jon, check out the study below.

535633b57c4a4940d1e913e7a12ee791

(1013)

on April 19, 2011
at 06:00 PM

I am getting this idea from the study I posted below. Granted animals fats are way better than vegetable/seed oils, but do they contribute in some way to inflammation?

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18472)

on April 19, 2011
at 05:52 PM

This is a good question, but when you make a statement in a question that people may not like, you open yourself up for a downvote. The opening sentence in this question is pretty questionable.

2f54dbe892ec89b12d1db686568e885a

(919)

on April 19, 2011
at 05:16 PM

why the downvote/ +1 from me

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on April 19, 2011
at 05:08 PM

The saturated fat from these animals is NOT the problem. It's the excess omega 6 and reduction of omega 3 that is the problem.

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on April 19, 2011
at 02:55 PM

What pro-inflammatory compounds do you have in mind? That the fat of conventionally raised animals contains more pro-inflammatory unsaturated fats is widely remarked upon, but what's wrong/different about the *saturated* fat specifically? Also, why think that fat of conventionally raised animals would be more inflammatory than lean meat + carbohydrates to replace the fat?

D83e454e794d761ab524814c0ff8f838

(531)

on April 19, 2011
at 02:37 PM

I've wondered that about animals that are grass-fed, and grain finished, which is mostly what I find.

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4 Answers

6
4bf5827bfb7df85c5b4b485db0945e64

(1386)

on April 19, 2011
at 02:54 PM

If you compare the amount of linoleic acid (omega-6) in farmed animals vs. seed and vegetable oil, the difference is still night and day. Of the animals I know, I think chicken dark meat ranks among the highest for linoleic acid content.

Also, all cattle are grass-fed for most of their life (they have to be) and then grain-finished to get fat/marbled. This saturates their system with n-6 (and linoleic acid) but the meat is generally low overall in PUFA and high in saturated fat. The saturated fat is actually quite stable and unlikely to cause inflammation which is why the PUFA content is so popular now amongst Paleo circles.

535633b57c4a4940d1e913e7a12ee791

(1013)

on April 19, 2011
at 06:02 PM

Jon, check out the study below.

2
Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18472)

on April 19, 2011
at 02:50 PM

It is the poly fats that can be pro-inflammation, not the saturated fats, even in grain fed meats. I would say the sat fat from grain fed animals is definitely "better" than the polyunsaturated fats in seed oils. It is the unsaturated fats in grain fed animals that is unfavorable due to omega6 being higher than the fat of grass fed animals.

2
3fdaf84be3f5f9054d2a9a029db95acf

on April 19, 2011
at 02:50 PM

I believe it's more about the ratios of Omega-6's to Omega-3's. Grass-fed has a better ratio. If you can only get regular beef, then eat more fish or fish capsules (though there is debate about that as well).

0
535633b57c4a4940d1e913e7a12ee791

(1013)

on April 19, 2011
at 05:57 PM

This is the study I am referring to:

Consumption of saturated fat impairs the anti-inflammatory properties of high-density lipoproteins and endothelial function.

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of dietary fatty acids on the anti-inflammatory properties of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) and vascular function. BACKGROUND: The effect of dietary fatty acids on atherogenesis remains uncertain. METHODS: Fourteen adults consumed an isocaloric meal containing either a polyunsaturated or a saturated fat on 2 occasions. The effects of post-prandial HDL on endothelial cell expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) were determined. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and microvascular reactivity were assessed before and 3 and 6 h after the meal. RESULTS: Plasma triglycerides, insulin, and nonesterified fatty acids rose after the meals. The HDL collected 6 h after the saturated meal were less effective than HDL isolated from fasting plasma in terms of their ability to inhibit expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, whereas HDL collected 6 h after the polyunsaturated meal had an inhibitory activity that was greater than that of HDL collected from fasting plasma (p < 0.004 and p = 0.01 for comparison of effect of meals on ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, respectively). Post-hyperemic microvascular flow significantly increased at 3 h after the polyunsaturated meal by 45 +/- 14% and by 21 +/- 11% after the saturated meal. The FMD decreased 3 h after the saturated meal by 2.2 +/- 0.9% (p< 0.05 compared with baseline) and by 0.9 +/- 1% after the polyunsaturated meal. CONCLUSIONS: Consumption of a saturated fat reduces the anti-inflammatory potential of HDL and impairs arterial endothelial function. In contrast, the anti-inflammatory activity of HDL improves after consumption of polyunsaturated fat. These findings highlight novel mechanisms by which different dietary fatty acids may influence key atherogenic processes.

Keywords: dietary fatty acids, from fasting plasma, fatty acids, polyunsaturated meal, saturated meal, anti inflammatory, dietary fatty, fasting plasma, adhesion molecule, from fasting, saturated, polyunsaturated, acids, fatty, plasma, collected, inflammatory, dietary

Authored by Nicholls SJ, Lundman P, Harmer JA, Cutri B, Griffiths KA, Rye KA, Barter PJ, Celermajer DS. The Heart Research Institute, Sydney, Australia. Comment in: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2007 May 1;49(17):1825-6.

Published in J Am Coll Cardiol. 2006 Aug 15;48(4):715-20. Epub 2006 Jul 24. The full report is available online. link A subscription to the periodical may be required.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18472)

on April 19, 2011
at 08:02 PM

Who were these 14 people? How was their health? What did they eat for the study? What were the sources of sat fats and polys? It's extremely unlikely that eating sat fat caused inflammation in these people and eating poly was anti-inflammatory.

4bf5827bfb7df85c5b4b485db0945e64

(1386)

on April 26, 2011
at 04:01 PM

Anyway, what do you think, Mark? Do you have a different insight or perspective on the paper?

4bf5827bfb7df85c5b4b485db0945e64

(1386)

on April 26, 2011
at 04:01 PM

I would like to see the exact procedures in the experiment, similar to Jack's concerns with confounding factors. 14 people is a very small study size, especially if a portion of them were the controls (which I'm assuming there were). So maybe 4 people saturated fat, 4 people PUFA, and 4 people controls? I'd want to see exactly what they were eating. They use this statement, "these findings highlight novel mechanisms by which different dietary fatty acids may influence key atherogenic processes", but what exactly are the mechanisms? This study doesn't change my stance on the lipid hypothesis.

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