9

votes

Iron in meat a factor for inflammation and aging?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 30, 2011 at 4:57 PM

What do you think about Don's new post about the negative effects of iron?

iron, oxidation, inflammation and aging

A few excerpts:

In The Iron Factor of Aging, Francesco S. Facchini discusses the relationship between iron and chronic diseases at length. After a thorough review of the evidence linking iron to inflammation, disease, and aging, he notes that when we look at modern nations, people who have diets with a lower iron availability also have lower rates of chronic inflammatory, autoimmune, and degenerative diseases. These include the Mediterranean and Asian nations where tea, wine, cheese, legumes, vegetables, and fruits provide the 'antinutrients' reducing iron availability, and people either consume less red meat and more white meat (fish and poultry, lower in iron) or nearly vegetarian diets.

[...] In general, in modernized nations, women have a greater life expectancy than men. This means women age more slowly, and this may occur because women lose iron every month, resulting in a lower iron status, and a lower level of hydroxyl radical formation.

[...] Men can reduce their iron stores by regularly consuming 'antinutrients' and giving blood.

4b911b2e3c5d07e4688ba4c753bc3b3c

(35)

on December 24, 2011
at 08:32 PM

So could there be an issue with cooking in cast iron pans?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 13, 2011
at 07:12 AM

http://www.lewrockwell.com/sardi/sardi39.html

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on November 12, 2011
at 07:12 PM

Of course they did mention that having enough calcium and vitamin e prevents this. We don't say that vitamin d is bad because in the case of a magnesium deficiency it can be problematic.

D1c02d4fc5125a670cf419dbb3e18ba7

on November 12, 2011
at 06:45 PM

I know cookies aren't Paleo but smartcookies are too rewarding to not want one. Smart and smoking hot FTW!!!

673f7ad6052448d51496f177395416b7

(344)

on November 12, 2011
at 06:45 PM

can someone help me out regarding drinking coffee to reduce absorption of iron? will this interfere with calcium absorption or will supplementing with K2 and D be enough? Trying to strike a balance here.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on October 29, 2011
at 12:05 AM

That's why I'm glad I'm a lady :)

F1b39d4f620876330312f4925bd51900

(4090)

on October 14, 2011
at 10:58 PM

I am also with Ray Peat on this one.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on October 14, 2011
at 10:56 PM

This is why I have zero issues with coffee unless your have NE or EPI issues or your HRV is out of whack

B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on October 13, 2011
at 10:31 AM

I'm with Ray on this as well. Additionally, if you like running I believe this will help get rid of iron. Many elite athletes become iron deficient when training hard. The action of your feet hitting the ground smashes red blood cells and then you pee them out.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on October 01, 2011
at 01:02 AM

Im with peat on this rec!

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on September 30, 2011
at 10:38 PM

I wouldn't say "iron in meat", it's the most bioavailable form, but the most iron comes from fortification. Plus meat contains carnosine which protects against damage from iron. Just saying.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on September 30, 2011
at 09:46 PM

and yeah phytic acid http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phytic_acid

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on September 30, 2011
at 09:45 PM

who, smartcookie?

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on September 30, 2011
at 06:34 PM

this is the woman you should be talking to about this ^^^^.

Cfc7dee889a66db9cd76c4f348109294

(1652)

on September 30, 2011
at 06:16 PM

phytate is IP6 right?

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on September 30, 2011
at 05:42 PM

Also, Ray Peat is big time anti-iron and he recommends drinking coffee with high iron foods like red meat to reduce the absorption. I don't have time to post direct links so that's why I'm keeping it in comments, but you can go to www.raypeat.com if you are interesting in reading more!

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on September 30, 2011
at 05:41 PM

This is interesting because I was just having a convo about the reasons phytic acid seems to benefit cancer and specifically colon cancer. We saw some research that supports the fact that iron overload is correlated with colon cancer. I speculated that the phytic acid was acting as a chelator of excess iron and thus benefiting the colon in that way.

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2 Answers

1
Da3d4a6835c0f5256b2ef829b3ba3393

on October 29, 2011
at 05:35 PM

"Epidemiological data thus show a suggestive association between dietary heme and risk of colon cancer. The analysis of experimental studies in rats with chemically-induced colon cancer showed that dietary hemoglobin and red meat consistently promote aberrant crypt foci, a putative precancer lesion. The mechanism is not known, but heme iron has a catalytic effect on (i) the endogenous formation of carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds and (ii) the formation of cytotoxic and genotoxic aldehydes by lipoperoxidation. A review of evidence supporting these hypotheses suggests that both pathways are involved in heme iron toxicity."

http://cancerprevention.aacrjournals.org/content/4/2/177.short

"Moreover, our studies show that beef meat and cured pork meat promote colon carcinogenesis in rats. The major promoter in meat is heme iron, via N-nitrosation or fat peroxidation. Dietary additives can suppress the toxic effects of heme iron."

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0309174011001458

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on November 12, 2011
at 07:12 PM

Of course they did mention that having enough calcium and vitamin e prevents this. We don't say that vitamin d is bad because in the case of a magnesium deficiency it can be problematic.

1
64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on September 30, 2011
at 05:51 PM

I agree completely and give blood fairly often to reduce my iron levels. Also am considering taking an IP6 supplement too.

You should also check out this thread http://paleohacks.com/questions/34678/blood-donations#axzz1ZTXlEI87

there is a great answer from the quilt

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on September 30, 2011
at 09:46 PM

and yeah phytic acid http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phytic_acid

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on September 30, 2011
at 06:34 PM

this is the woman you should be talking to about this ^^^^.

Cfc7dee889a66db9cd76c4f348109294

(1652)

on September 30, 2011
at 06:16 PM

phytate is IP6 right?

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on September 30, 2011
at 09:45 PM

who, smartcookie?

D1c02d4fc5125a670cf419dbb3e18ba7

on November 12, 2011
at 06:45 PM

I know cookies aren't Paleo but smartcookies are too rewarding to not want one. Smart and smoking hot FTW!!!

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