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Inflammation, inflammatory cytokines, and cortisol?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 10, 2012 at 2:50 PM

To preface, I'd like to get my terminology correct: is all dietary induced inflammation necessarily caused by pro-inflammatory cytokines and eicosanoids? Or are there other methods as well?

I know:

That Gluten induces a cytokine response,

that n-6 PUFAs "are substrates for eicosanoid and cytokine synthesis",

and that "n-6 fatty acid arachidonic acid (AA; 20:4n-6) gives rise to eicosanoid mediators that have established roles in inflammation"

So given that evidence, I glean that largely dietary inflammation is going to be based on one of the several cytokines. Please correct me if I'm wrong.

With that (hopefully) cleared up - my actual question is: can the level of inflammatory cytokines in the body cause a cortisol response? Is it possible that chronic inflammation due to diet could be responsible for elevated cortisol levels?

Further, will long-term elevated cortisol levels result in physical inflammation? Do the levels of the two necessarily scale? Is it possible to have one or the other, long-term, without the other?

Edit: on doing a bit more reading, I've found that short term cortisol release is intended to control inflammatory response, which makes sense - to mediate acute stress. What about in the case of chronic elevated levels? Does it become inflammatory? And what of chronic inflammation alone, will it become the cause of chronic elevated cortisol? I did find that heart disease may be implicated by "a dysregulated cortisol secretion that may involve a failure to contain inflammatory activity."

03a4ec34751186201a56da298ac843ce

(4100)

on July 02, 2012
at 03:26 AM

Thank you for the article

0d0842381492a41b2173a04014aae810

(4875)

on May 12, 2012
at 01:11 AM

Thanks for being the only reply as well. Not much interest in biochem around here lately.

0d0842381492a41b2173a04014aae810

(4875)

on May 11, 2012
at 03:22 AM

Thanks for the link, lots of good info!

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1 Answers

1
7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on May 10, 2012
at 06:54 PM

Dr. Art Ayers makes a brief explanation of inflammation here- What's Opposite of Inflammation. Long term elevated weakens the body, but I don't know if there is a direct relationship to inflammation. A surplus of cortisol usually means a hormonal landscape not conducive to muscle growth and repair.

0d0842381492a41b2173a04014aae810

(4875)

on May 11, 2012
at 03:22 AM

Thanks for the link, lots of good info!

0d0842381492a41b2173a04014aae810

(4875)

on May 12, 2012
at 01:11 AM

Thanks for being the only reply as well. Not much interest in biochem around here lately.

03a4ec34751186201a56da298ac843ce

(4100)

on July 02, 2012
at 03:26 AM

Thank you for the article

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