0

votes

How do you make your thai/ indian etc food paleo?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created April 16, 2011 at 9:21 AM

It's almost impossible for me to find recipes to make thai and indian foods from scratch! Everywhere recommends curry paste/ powder. I usually use powders and spices in my indian curries but I don't get the deep authentic indian flavors like they do in restaurants, and all of the curry pastes at the stores (including whole foods) are loaded with crap. Any suggestions? I made a fairly good indian curry last night but used way too many cloves (the from-scratch recipe I found didn't specify the quantity of spices) and like 3/4 a stick of grass-fed butter. Any suggestions?

65430e39d7e9e9322718d016fe668051

(2944)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

Thank you! This sounds delicious

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on April 17, 2011
at 01:03 AM

In my experience the sauce solidifies in the fridge and you have to reheat the entire batch to put it back in working order. It's not so bad, just annoying.

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on April 17, 2011
at 12:35 AM

o got it now, "it" = the sauce . still, it doesn't follow that it wouldn't keep as well, but nevermind. looks yum.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on April 16, 2011
at 10:05 PM

I shop at a lot of Indian markets and I can confirm that I see lots of Indian grannies buying powders and "vegetable ghee"

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on April 16, 2011
at 10:04 PM

Yes, I know coconut oil and ghee should not be in fridge, but this sauce is a make-ahead thing that you store in the fridge

65430e39d7e9e9322718d016fe668051

(2944)

on April 16, 2011
at 08:26 PM

I should probably look into some indian cookbooks. I have an organic curry powder from whole foods but it's bland and doesn't give a deep flavor.

65430e39d7e9e9322718d016fe668051

(2944)

on April 16, 2011
at 08:24 PM

Great spices. This sounds like what I used the other night... my friend didn't like it because I used way too many cloves and it was "chewy".

07ad8e05f734cb1deec5479dc0e4a194

(315)

on April 16, 2011
at 07:12 PM

carrot halwa!! I love it! Great recipe, Justine!

86e631c6164bfdf4221434e2d38125b3

(414)

on April 16, 2011
at 06:07 PM

I love the Thai Kitchen curry paste! I always have a jar of red and green in the fridge. I use the recipe on the jar as a guideline but I end up using way more of the curry paste than recommended. I also add in ginger and garlic to taste. I throw in some cut up chicken and veggies, simmer it until veggies are cooked and that's it! Delicious.

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on April 16, 2011
at 05:53 PM

oops, *incredibly

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on April 16, 2011
at 05:50 PM

coconut oil and ghee have an incerdible long shelf life (1+ yrs) and should not be refrigerated. they are expensive though. i worked at a pseudo-indian restaurant and we used "vegetable ghee" made mostly of palm oil [because it is much less $$$ than ghee, and most uninformed folks think it's healthier (like margarine)]. sometimes "vegetable ghee" is hydrogenated; it's basically shortening. i think it's commonly used. now i'm curious about the fatty acid profile of palm oil.. off to google...

345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on April 16, 2011
at 04:06 PM

Found this site for Madhur Jaffrey WITH recipes! !http://www.mykitchentable.co.uk/index.php/2010/12/madhur-jaffrey-my-kitchen-table-100-essential-curries/

531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

(8878)

on April 16, 2011
at 04:05 PM

May be that vegetable oil "keeps" better but the reason I've been given is that ghee is just too expensive. I will try a variation of this with ghee. Thx!

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on April 16, 2011
at 02:41 PM

Yep, Madhur Jaffrey Indian Cooking is a great cook book about indian cuisine. A very good and authentic thai cook book is Thai Food by David Thompson http://www.amazon.co.uk/Thai-Food-David-Thompson/dp/1862055149

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on April 16, 2011
at 02:09 PM

I also love it there!

2f54dbe892ec89b12d1db686568e885a

(919)

on April 16, 2011
at 12:21 PM

don't bother to measure - let your taste and smell be your guide

65430e39d7e9e9322718d016fe668051

(2944)

on April 16, 2011
at 09:50 AM

That's a great idea! I never thought about that. Thank you!

65430e39d7e9e9322718d016fe668051

(2944)

on April 16, 2011
at 09:49 AM

I never thought about that! Thanks.

  • 65430e39d7e9e9322718d016fe668051

    asked by

    (2944)
  • Views
    2.7K
  • Last Activity
    1403D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

8 Answers

3
9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on April 16, 2011
at 02:15 PM

I own a very useful book called The Curry Secret, and it has the recipe for the secret base sauce that restaurants use, which they modify for each type of curry (for example, add some garam masala and really hot peppers). This has made me not want to eat out at such restaurants any more because the sheer amt of veg oil used. Use ghee or coconut oil instead at home. The problem with these ingredients and why restaurants use veg oil is that coco oil and ghee solidify in fridge, which means it doesn't keep as well.

How To Make The Curry Sauce For approximately eight main course dishes. Preparation and cooking time: 1 hr 30 minutes approx.

  • 2 lb (900g) cooking onions
  • 2 oz (50g) green ginger
  • 2 oz (50g) garlic
  • 2?? pint (I litre 570ml) water
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tin (8oz/225g) tomatoes
  • 8 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 1 teaspoon tomato puree
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric
  • 1 teaspoon paprika

Stage One Peel and rinse the onions, ginger, and garlic. Slice the onions and roughly chop the ginger and garlic. Put the ginger and garlic into a blender with about ?? pint of the water and blend until smooth. Take a large saucepan and put into it the onions, the blended garlic and ginger, and the remainder of the water. Add the salt and bring to the boil. Turn down the heat to very low and simmer, with the lid on, for 40-45 minutes. Leave to cool.

Stage Two Once cooled, pour half the boiled onion mixture into a blender and blend until perfectly smooth. Absolute smoothness is essential. To be certain, blend for at least two minutes. Pour the blended onion mixture into a clean pan or bowl and repeat with the other half of the boiled onion mixture. Wash and dry the saucepan. Reserve about four tablespoons of the sauce at this stage to use in cooking the chicken (page 52) and lamb (page 66).

Stage Three Open the can of tomatoes, put into the rinsed blender jug, and blend. Again, it is important that they are blended perfectly smooth, so blend for two minutes. Into the clean saucepan, pour the oil, tomato puree, turmeric, and paprika. Add the blended tomatoes and bring to the boil. Turn down the heat and cook, stirring occasionally, for ten minutes. Now add the onion mixture to the saucepan and bring to the boil again. Turn down the heat enough to keep the sauce at a simmer. You will notice at this stage that a froth rises to the surface of the sauce. This needs to be skimmed off. Keep simmering for 20-25 minutes. Stirring now and again to prevent the sauce sticking to the bottom of the saucepan. Use immediately or cool and refrigerate for up to four days.

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on April 16, 2011
at 05:53 PM

oops, *incredibly

65430e39d7e9e9322718d016fe668051

(2944)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

Thank you! This sounds delicious

531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

(8878)

on April 16, 2011
at 04:05 PM

May be that vegetable oil "keeps" better but the reason I've been given is that ghee is just too expensive. I will try a variation of this with ghee. Thx!

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on April 16, 2011
at 10:04 PM

Yes, I know coconut oil and ghee should not be in fridge, but this sauce is a make-ahead thing that you store in the fridge

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on April 16, 2011
at 05:50 PM

coconut oil and ghee have an incerdible long shelf life (1+ yrs) and should not be refrigerated. they are expensive though. i worked at a pseudo-indian restaurant and we used "vegetable ghee" made mostly of palm oil [because it is much less $$$ than ghee, and most uninformed folks think it's healthier (like margarine)]. sometimes "vegetable ghee" is hydrogenated; it's basically shortening. i think it's commonly used. now i'm curious about the fatty acid profile of palm oil.. off to google...

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on April 17, 2011
at 01:03 AM

In my experience the sauce solidifies in the fridge and you have to reheat the entire batch to put it back in working order. It's not so bad, just annoying.

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on April 17, 2011
at 12:35 AM

o got it now, "it" = the sauce . still, it doesn't follow that it wouldn't keep as well, but nevermind. looks yum.

2
Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 16, 2011
at 12:59 PM

I'm a big, big fan of the Spice House . When I lived in Chicago i used to go to their retail store all the time, but they also do mail order. They have some awesome Indian spice blends as well as any individual spice you could possibly want. I also love their Dutch unsweetened cocoa. Nice extra high fat content. Their spices will not contain the "junk" you're looking to avoid.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on April 16, 2011
at 02:09 PM

I also love it there!

2
74d0407ca99061cab2512ed83683b498

on April 16, 2011
at 12:45 PM

Madhur Jaffrey's cookbooks are full of wonderful Indian recipes made from scratch -- she's sort of the Julia Child of India. You can find ingredients at Kalustyan's, which does mail order, if you live in an area where these things are hard to find. Personally, I eat Indian sans rice on cheat-y days, usually spicy chicken tikka masala, and I don't worry too much about what's in there. If you go to a good place, it's going to be spices, ghee, chicken thighs, cream, tomato, and chilis.

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on April 16, 2011
at 02:41 PM

Yep, Madhur Jaffrey Indian Cooking is a great cook book about indian cuisine. A very good and authentic thai cook book is Thai Food by David Thompson http://www.amazon.co.uk/Thai-Food-David-Thompson/dp/1862055149

345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on April 16, 2011
at 04:06 PM

Found this site for Madhur Jaffrey WITH recipes! !http://www.mykitchentable.co.uk/index.php/2010/12/madhur-jaffrey-my-kitchen-table-100-essential-curries/

2
2f54dbe892ec89b12d1db686568e885a

(919)

on April 16, 2011
at 12:19 PM

black mustard seeds, cardamon pods, cinnamon stick, fresh ginger, curry leaves, cumin, turmeric, coriander, garam masala, red chili powder - go for it !

2f54dbe892ec89b12d1db686568e885a

(919)

on April 16, 2011
at 12:21 PM

don't bother to measure - let your taste and smell be your guide

65430e39d7e9e9322718d016fe668051

(2944)

on April 16, 2011
at 08:24 PM

Great spices. This sounds like what I used the other night... my friend didn't like it because I used way too many cloves and it was "chewy".

1
2507b557331c8a674bc81197531e609a

(4994)

on April 16, 2011
at 09:47 AM

Make your own paste, it's super easy, google will have 1000s of recipes :)

65430e39d7e9e9322718d016fe668051

(2944)

on April 16, 2011
at 09:50 AM

That's a great idea! I never thought about that. Thank you!

65430e39d7e9e9322718d016fe668051

(2944)

on April 16, 2011
at 09:49 AM

I never thought about that! Thanks.

0
559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on April 16, 2011
at 05:38 PM

i'm not convinced that many/most indian restaurants don't use boxed spiced blends/curry pastes themselves. that "deep authentic" flavor you're looking for might actually be msg or something! the obvious use of food coloring at some places backs up this hypothesis. the standard indian diet nowadays doesn't preclude the artificial/unnatural any more than other industrial societies.. SADLY. i know that's not what you're looking for, i'm just saying.

but it sounds like you're on the right track - be sure to update with your secrets when you find success!

as far as thai food at home, i use the little jars of Thai Kitchen brand curry paste, you can get it at whole foods, and there's no Added Crap! :) you know what's delicious? deviled eggs made with this stuff!

86e631c6164bfdf4221434e2d38125b3

(414)

on April 16, 2011
at 06:07 PM

I love the Thai Kitchen curry paste! I always have a jar of red and green in the fridge. I use the recipe on the jar as a guideline but I end up using way more of the curry paste than recommended. I also add in ginger and garlic to taste. I throw in some cut up chicken and veggies, simmer it until veggies are cooked and that's it! Delicious.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on April 16, 2011
at 10:05 PM

I shop at a lot of Indian markets and I can confirm that I see lots of Indian grannies buying powders and "vegetable ghee"

0
Dd017a9b1f2d6a9c220859f780da09c5

on April 16, 2011
at 04:30 PM

I cook Indian curries all the time.. just looked at a couple of my Indian cookbooks, and all of them just list the individual spices that you mix together (e.g. cumin, turmeric, paprika, coriander, etc.).. so my advice would be to find recipes where they break down the curry spices rather than ones that require some sort of store-bought paste / mixture..

btw, i've also seen "organic curry powder" at whole foods that looked clean, if your recipes call for that..

65430e39d7e9e9322718d016fe668051

(2944)

on April 16, 2011
at 08:26 PM

I should probably look into some indian cookbooks. I have an organic curry powder from whole foods but it's bland and doesn't give a deep flavor.

0
B2b7d557e07e2450b01cf33fd690fe5b

on April 16, 2011
at 10:33 AM

Let google and your tastebuds guide you:) Thats what I did with my indian carrot pudding link text

07ad8e05f734cb1deec5479dc0e4a194

(315)

on April 16, 2011
at 07:12 PM

carrot halwa!! I love it! Great recipe, Justine!

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!