2

votes

Hack my fat malabsorption

Answered on July 19, 2015
Created September 17, 2011 at 5:08 PM

I've found a stable symptom free dietary point eating very low fat fish and scallops and white rice with occasional beef.

However this diet isn't very tasty.

Whenever I introduce more fat, I get fatigue, extra sleep, mood effects and IBS. It's not an allergic reaction; it's all being driven by the mechanical IBS-D cycle.

Fat malabsorption is the biggest problem I would like to solve about my body. If I could do that, I would enjoy a lot more freedom. Maintaining a relatively flavorless low-fat diet requires continual exercise of willpower and may not even be possible if fat cravings eventually develop.

The causes of my fat malabsorption could be genetic or microfloral or due to medication.

  1. Genetic - My father had IBS, although he is now cured with a far less restrictive diet.
  2. Microfloral - I took many courses of antibiotics during childhood through college due to allergies and sinus infections.
  3. Medication - I took an accutane course in college for acne, and wasn't getting much sunlight at the time, which can exacerbate the negative effects.

My hypothesis is that some kind of enhancement of my microflora can improve my ability to digest fat.

I do not believe that methods like bone broth or GAPS diet will work. Gradual reintroduction is not effective for me. I have been on a relatively stable symptomless diet for a long time with only minor infractions and no corresponding increased ability to digest forbidden foods. It is not an issue of lingering inflammation.

I am looking for 1. Scientific literature regarding what specific bacteria I may be missing (or perhaps what's overgrown) 2. Low impact ways of ingesting said bacteria without triggering my IBS. 3. Alternate hypotheses and evidence that contradict my theory and interpretation of the facts.

3864f9a2af09b1b447c7963058650a34

(3703)

on September 18, 2011
at 08:12 PM

NOW brand is really good but Thorne and Ness are also excellent (typically dye-free, gluten-free, soy-free, blah blah) but obviously if you have super high chemical sensitivities, watch for reactions. Personally I've been dealing with metal related gut dysbiosis. Very few things work and it is frustrating. The enzymes help to control SIBO -- when FOOD is broken down to useful parts, means less to putrify, ferment and annoy/irritate the gut! Digestion is a GOOD THING whether it is assisted temporarily or not. Wish you luck and hope to hear of your wonderful experiences in an update!

3864f9a2af09b1b447c7963058650a34

(3703)

on September 18, 2011
at 08:11 PM

NOW brand is really good but Thorne and Ness are excellent (typically dye-free, gluten-free, soy-free, blah blah) but obviously if you have super high chemical sensitivities, watch for reactions. Personally I've been dealing with metal related gut dysbiosis. Very few things work and it is frustrating. The enzymes help to control SIBO -- when FOOD is broken, means less to putrify, ferment and annoy/irritate the gut! Digestion is a GOOD THING whether it is assisted temporarily or not. Wish you luck and hope to hear of your wonderful experiences in an update!

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 18, 2011
at 07:58 AM

i haven't simply because most purchasable ones contain sugar or other chemicals that I react badly to. I'd have to make it myself. I was thinking fermented fish maybe. Seems risky though. I haven't tried probiotics and enzymes in a looong time, since long before I found out that food intolerances were a problem. I'll pick some up, they might help.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 18, 2011
at 07:57 AM

that's a good angle, I haven't ruled it out. Judging by the daily value tables I might be a little low on choline with a diet of scallops and fish, although it doesn't seem like that should happen, theoretically speaking.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 18, 2011
at 07:55 AM

the non-fat option sounds interesting, thanks.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 17, 2011
at 06:14 PM

However I will also try the ideas suggested here, and I found a great post by qualia here that has many ideas: http://paleohacks.com/questions/19876/has-anyone-here-recovered-from-being-allergic-to-everything/22354#22354

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 17, 2011
at 06:13 PM

This will also resolve my issue with excess fat consumption, since that is a temptation arising from choices in cuts of fish meat. There are no scallop cuts that have excessive fat. So I will simply stop eating fish to avoid the problem.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 17, 2011
at 06:13 PM

Since by far my best vitality results are with scallops, logic dictates that I eat scallop risotto going forward. That reflects my commitment to maximimum performance for the kingdom, regardless of flavor. To address the flavorlessness issue with scallops, I can get a non-stick small frying pan. Rice will be cooked in the rice cooker and then transferred to the frying pan with a batch of scallops and cooked until the rice absorbs the juices and "fries" and the scallops brown to crispyness. That should be sufficiently delicious and satisfy the craving for carmelized carbs and meat.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 17, 2011
at 05:53 PM

I think I've gone a few months max, usually a month or several weeks.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 17, 2011
at 05:53 PM

No I haven't, thanks for the tip. That's the kind of thing I'm looking for.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 17, 2011
at 05:51 PM

As I understand it, bone broth and GAPS involve eating liquidized fat and well-cooked veggies. I avoid both because they give me IBS-D. It seems to be a non-starter.

Ec7cb2a7a68655954a01f03e95be1383

(1453)

on September 17, 2011
at 05:40 PM

your liver may have problems digesting fat, that is you could have a sluggish liver which isn't used to fat. Did you try milk thistle extract?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 17, 2011
at 05:34 PM

My fat tolerance is unchanged even on a purely ketogenic all-meat diet.

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8 Answers

1
3864f9a2af09b1b447c7963058650a34

(3703)

on September 17, 2011
at 09:50 PM

What fermented foods have you tried, as Dragonfly commented on?

Have you tried digestive enzymes?

http://www.iherb.com/Now-Foods-Pancreatin-High-Potency-4x-500-mg-250-Capsules/716?at=0

3864f9a2af09b1b447c7963058650a34

(3703)

on September 18, 2011
at 08:12 PM

NOW brand is really good but Thorne and Ness are also excellent (typically dye-free, gluten-free, soy-free, blah blah) but obviously if you have super high chemical sensitivities, watch for reactions. Personally I've been dealing with metal related gut dysbiosis. Very few things work and it is frustrating. The enzymes help to control SIBO -- when FOOD is broken down to useful parts, means less to putrify, ferment and annoy/irritate the gut! Digestion is a GOOD THING whether it is assisted temporarily or not. Wish you luck and hope to hear of your wonderful experiences in an update!

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 18, 2011
at 07:58 AM

i haven't simply because most purchasable ones contain sugar or other chemicals that I react badly to. I'd have to make it myself. I was thinking fermented fish maybe. Seems risky though. I haven't tried probiotics and enzymes in a looong time, since long before I found out that food intolerances were a problem. I'll pick some up, they might help.

3864f9a2af09b1b447c7963058650a34

(3703)

on September 18, 2011
at 08:11 PM

NOW brand is really good but Thorne and Ness are excellent (typically dye-free, gluten-free, soy-free, blah blah) but obviously if you have super high chemical sensitivities, watch for reactions. Personally I've been dealing with metal related gut dysbiosis. Very few things work and it is frustrating. The enzymes help to control SIBO -- when FOOD is broken, means less to putrify, ferment and annoy/irritate the gut! Digestion is a GOOD THING whether it is assisted temporarily or not. Wish you luck and hope to hear of your wonderful experiences in an update!

0
5acc87eb85a51c6e8b28e053aeedeb15

on July 19, 2015
at 11:00 AM

A few things I found out to help with my fat malabsorption :

Coconut oil is made up of medium chain triglycerides, which are known to be
absorbed directly into the bloodstream. MCT are used for people with
malabsorption problem. Long chain fatty acids are harder to absorb
because they need bile and pancreas action before they are ready to come
in contact with the mucosa and be absorbed.

Mixing 30%fat cheese with a big spoonful of mustard seems to work well for me.
I add some honey and a few drops of lecithin as well. Honey, lecithin
and mustard are emulsifiers so they will divide fat into small
particules and increase the area of contact with lipase as well as the
amount of fat in contact with the intestinal mucosa.

Colon bacterias produce short chain fatty acids, in small amount (100kcal/day if I remember well) but enough that it makes a difference in energy if your colon bacteria are healthy.

Food that prevent fat absorption are apple pectin (as well as other fibers) and green tea.

I really hope I can hack this further because I have a big energy problem and fat malabsorption seems to be the cause. Some more info I've gathered :

The bacteria firmicute probably increase fat absorption, many studies link them with obesity.

Possible causes of fat malabsorption :
- Decrease in intestinal ph
- Defective mucosal cells or intestinal mucosal abnormalities (such as small
- intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO),
- Viscous mucus (Intestinal inflammation)
- Changes in biliary bile salt composition and/or the enterohepatic
circulation of bile salts.
- lack of bile acids (due to liver damage, hypolipidemic drugs, or gallbladder
removal (cholecystectomy))
- defects in pancreatic enzymes
- SIBO = The bacteria deconjugate bile salts, causing failure of micelle
formation and subsequent fat malabsorption (deconjugation of some BAs by
bacteria is a normal step, but too many bacterias = too much deconjugation? )

Deseases associated with steatorrhea (too much fat in feces)
- Malabsorption, e.g. in inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and
abetalipoproteinemia[2][3]
- Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency
- Pancreatitis
- Choledocholithiasis (obstruction of the bile duct by a gallstone)
- Pancreatic cancer (if it obstructs biliary outflow)
- Primary sclerosing cholangitis
- Bacterial overgrowth
- Short bowel syndrome
- Cystic fibrosis
- Celiac Disease
- Zollinger-Ellison syndrome
- Giardiasis (a protozoan parasite infection)
- Graves' disease / hyperthyroidism
- Abuse or misuse of certain prescribed slimming pills (such as Orlistat)
- Tropical sprue

0
693801f6c954a6708f429838ac33a3e2

on October 29, 2013
at 06:10 AM

I have been having digestive issues and new food intolerances for the last 3-4 years. I notice that I don't do well with greasy foods, which is pretty rough when you consider fats to be healthy.

After many many visits to doctors and naturopaths I finally discovered that I have H Pylori, a relatively common bacteria that lives in your stomach and eats it away. definitely something to look into.

I am taking mastic gum, oregano oil, ox bile, lipo ease enzymes, and soil based probiotics and they are definitely helping.

0
595f897a2632616a518594f7641f97d2

on February 19, 2012
at 01:03 AM

i took bile salts from starndard process along with kefir and it helps alot.

0
7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on September 17, 2011
at 09:55 PM

Have you ruled out problems with bile? Sufficient bile is required to emulsify fats so they can be absorbed (why it's an issue for those w/o a gallbladder). Liver is responsible for bile production ... and it's unfortunate that some of the best sources for the nutrients the liver needs (like choline) are in healthy fats (like beef liver, pastured egg yolks, etc). You can supplement bile salts, so that may be worth an experiment, though it's worth being cautious with that if you have a functional gallbladder; I've heard the liver can become dependent on them.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 18, 2011
at 07:57 AM

that's a good angle, I haven't ruled it out. Judging by the daily value tables I might be a little low on choline with a diet of scallops and fish, although it doesn't seem like that should happen, theoretically speaking.

0
Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on September 17, 2011
at 07:01 PM

Can you tolerate kombucha? (Non-fat) kefir? Both have helped me heal my gut flora.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 18, 2011
at 07:55 AM

the non-fat option sounds interesting, thanks.

0
A0e3b5eeb45b7d6e5689847fbc79959a

on September 17, 2011
at 05:42 PM

how long did you try that all meat diet?

and why are you opposed to trying the gaps diet?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 17, 2011
at 05:53 PM

I think I've gone a few months max, usually a month or several weeks.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 17, 2011
at 05:51 PM

As I understand it, bone broth and GAPS involve eating liquidized fat and well-cooked veggies. I avoid both because they give me IBS-D. It seems to be a non-starter.

0
60af23519906aa54b742ffc17477c3d3

(1186)

on September 17, 2011
at 05:29 PM

I would try cutting out the carbs (rice) entirely in favour of fats (coconut oil, mostly, as it had gut healing properties). If you don't ask your body to use the fat, it will compete with the carbs for absorption and lose. It will take the body some time to adjust, so you may have fatty stools for the first week or so. You could try cutting down the rice and upping the fat simultaneously until you have reached a low-carb (1/2c of rice daily) high fat (100 grams or so) diet.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 17, 2011
at 05:34 PM

My fat tolerance is unchanged even on a purely ketogenic all-meat diet.

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