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Which bow and arrows (and accessories) do I buy?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 17, 2013 at 5:12 PM

My first experience with a bow was at camp a couple decades ago as a child and it involved terrible plastic things, no instruction, and major failure.

I'm great with firearms, but I kind of wanted to dial it back away from gunpowder and such and try a bow and arrow (which, according to wikipedia, is probably totally paleo, or something to that effect). I don't want to buy a compound bow or anything fancy...I'm trying to keep it simple.

So what do I buy? My husband has med school debt up to his eyeballs, so I'm trying to keep costs down (sub-$100) for now unless I end up really digging it.

I'm 28, 5'7", and weigh ~125#...probably above average strength for being that size, but not a whole lot. I've not been keeping up with my lifting! My "wingspan" is 65.5", which the internet tells me means my draw length is ~25".

I saw this one and thought it might be ok:

http://www.amazon.com/Bear-Archery-Firebird-Bow-60-Inch/dp/B002BIM0H0

But I have no idea which arrows or what else I need...if anyone has a book rec to add to their answer, that would be nice, too.

3086e13b3740686a0abaa18f8c153f5b

(85)

on July 18, 2013
at 06:55 PM

You should be able to outfit yourself nicely for that kind of money. If buying new pick up a recurve bow with limbs you can change out. Just a dozen aluminum target arrows nothing fancy. A simple tube belt quiver arm guard and glove or tab. Grab some field face targets and set up three straw bales on your property. A hill for backstop us nice. A book I recommend is "instinctive shooting". I can't come up with the author though. If you have ever shot birds on the wing it will come natural enough. LOTS of short range practice to start. Like 10 yards. Develop your form and shooting muscles.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on July 18, 2013
at 01:16 AM

Thank you! We have an archery shop that's in a not-so-hot area that I've been meaning to stop in...but I'll have to wait until I can take someone with me. $200-300 is more in line with what I was thinking to start out.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on July 18, 2013
at 01:14 AM

Eek. Well, I'm planning on just kind of shooting at targets for awhile, so hopefully I can keep the costs down unless the bug bites me hard!

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on July 18, 2013
at 01:12 AM

The US - see my comment to I'm_With_Raquel. A pretty rural-ish, very hunting-friendly area. I'm planning mostly on target practice rather than hunting, but you never know. My gun club doesn't offer much in the way of instruction, sadly. I do have enough land to pretty much shoot at anything and not worry about accidents. Thanks for the tips on equipment...it seems strangely more daunting than when I first picked up a gun, but then my dad brought me up around firearms so I was already comfortable. And thanks especially for the ebay suggestion - wasn't sure how well stuff held up over the years.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on July 17, 2013
at 05:53 PM

And upvote for learning me something new!

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on July 17, 2013
at 05:53 PM

Huh...I had no idea it was banned there. I live in the midwest-ish part of the US, so hunting laws are pretty nonrestrictive.

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4 Answers

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1
3086e13b3740686a0abaa18f8c153f5b

(85)

on July 17, 2013
at 06:54 PM

I'm a bit confused as to whether you are in GB or not. Regardless, taking up archery is a fine sport. If you intend to hunt deer I recommend a draw weight of at least 45 pounds. For just target shooting 25-30 pounds is fine. You might want to go at this step-wise by purchasing a recurve target bow at 25 pounds draw weight to start. There are clubs everywhere that will offer plenty of instruction. Become proficient with the lighter weight bow then move up to a hunting bow. You can find all this stuff on ebay in hardly used condition cheap. Don't be afraid of a nice Bear archery bow from the 70's. they were made to last. I still hunt with 2 of them. You will need an arm guard, shooting glove and arrow quiver. A target quiver is fine to start. And of course a place to shoot. If you are rural enough stack up 3 straw bales and have at it. Start with a dozen target arrows. Preferably aluminum. Everything will fall into place from there

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1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on July 18, 2013
at 01:12 AM

The US - see my comment to I'm_With_Raquel. A pretty rural-ish, very hunting-friendly area. I'm planning mostly on target practice rather than hunting, but you never know. My gun club doesn't offer much in the way of instruction, sadly. I do have enough land to pretty much shoot at anything and not worry about accidents. Thanks for the tips on equipment...it seems strangely more daunting than when I first picked up a gun, but then my dad brought me up around firearms so I was already comfortable. And thanks especially for the ebay suggestion - wasn't sure how well stuff held up over the years.

2
Bfddc0ab925c8ea0e0c2e87198514907

on July 17, 2013
at 05:33 PM

It fills me with sadness that it's against the law in the UK to hunt with a bow and arrow ;(

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on July 17, 2013
at 05:53 PM

Huh...I had no idea it was banned there. I live in the midwest-ish part of the US, so hunting laws are pretty nonrestrictive.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on July 17, 2013
at 05:53 PM

And upvote for learning me something new!

1
5437163ddf70d4532f196bfb4333753e

(3614)

on July 17, 2013
at 07:19 PM

Go to an archery shop and ask about used equipment. Most avid bowhunters / archery enthusiasts upgrade quite often. You may be able to get hooked up with one of their customers who are in the market for the latest and greatest equipment. In addition, they will check it over and make sure everything is in good working order. Most likely, they will also give you some tips on shooting, as well. I got a nice used compound bow with arrows for less than $200 this way. They even "set it up" for me, adjusting poundage and draw length of the bow, and cutting the arrows to fit me. It already had an arrow rest, sights, etc.

The only thing I had to buy was a case (40-50 bucks but they can be had cheaper), a release (25), and an arm guard (5). With practice, you will be proficient enough to shoot a deer in no time. Of course, the hardest part is actually getting CLOSE ENOUGH to be able to get a good shot, but that's a whole other story. Best of luck!

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on July 18, 2013
at 01:16 AM

Thank you! We have an archery shop that's in a not-so-hot area that I've been meaning to stop in...but I'll have to wait until I can take someone with me. $200-300 is more in line with what I was thinking to start out.

3086e13b3740686a0abaa18f8c153f5b

(85)

on July 18, 2013
at 06:55 PM

You should be able to outfit yourself nicely for that kind of money. If buying new pick up a recurve bow with limbs you can change out. Just a dozen aluminum target arrows nothing fancy. A simple tube belt quiver arm guard and glove or tab. Grab some field face targets and set up three straw bales on your property. A hill for backstop us nice. A book I recommend is "instinctive shooting". I can't come up with the author though. If you have ever shot birds on the wing it will come natural enough. LOTS of short range practice to start. Like 10 yards. Develop your form and shooting muscles.

1
Acb677529a6974737bf1905ccfc7f748

(120)

on July 17, 2013
at 06:56 PM

Just go to your local archery shop and tell 'em you want to learn to hunt with a traditional bow. They'll hook you up, but it'll cost you a half a year's worth of pastured beef to get started.

I started hunting with a recurve a couple of years ago. After beginning with light limbs to get a feel for it and graduating to something heavy enough to take down a deer, plus all the arrows I went through (you'll break 'em constantly), plus qualifying for and buying your bow license, you're looking at $1000, easy.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on July 18, 2013
at 01:14 AM

Eek. Well, I'm planning on just kind of shooting at targets for awhile, so hopefully I can keep the costs down unless the bug bites me hard!

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