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"Hungry for Change" movie

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 09, 2012 at 2:35 AM

Without watching this movie, I suspect it's mostly proving their point, but not actually suggesting what we need to do. So, to anyone who's seen it, what are the bullet points for what the movie says that I DO in order to heal my brain. Is there anything that isn't already common Paleo knowledge?

Aa748fb43334ffd2db3934aa00874bbe

(458)

on October 09, 2012
at 06:11 PM

LOL @... "There's also this gem: "Your body is connected to a healing stream of energy (also known as chi, prana, light, Source, and God) that you can absorb at will" which points to woo fluffy bunnies and white light mystical BS that goes hand in hand with veganism and hippies."

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6 Answers

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Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on January 04, 2013
at 02:53 PM

Been a while since I watched it, but there was enough good stuff in it that I ended up buying it. Maybe I should watch it again this weekend. (And I've seen both Food Matters and Hungry for Change, so I hope I'm recalling the right one in what I say here...)

There was some nonsense in it, but also a lot of good information. One of the best things I remember from it was what Christiane Northrop said about body image and the the things we say to ourselves over and over about not being good enough -- the things that keep so many of us (women especially, but also men) from accomplishing big things in our lives and going after our dreams. My jaw almost hit the floor. Some of what she said could have come right out of my own mouth. It was nice to hear how common a thing it is -- the self-loathing and extremely negative self-talk that comes from poor body image and self-esteem.

I am a very dedicated, very happy relatively low-carber who eats plenty of meat and animal fat, so if I can sit through this movie without wanting to poke my eyes out and/or kill somebody, then anybody can. ;-)

They did go a little crazy on the juicing concept, but I don't know that the film's agenda was necessarily vegetarian/vegan. I didn't feel like it was propaganda for that. They weren't exactly telling people about Weston Price, but they did emphasize whole, real foods, and they all railed against sugar and flour, which was great. (Funny about all that fruit juice, though, huh? But I digress...) If I recall correctly, one guy even said that there's a place for all the "popular" diets if we follow nature and eat seasonally: in the summer, you'd have plenty of veg & fruit, in the fall, more squash, in the winter, more animals and fats without a lot of plant matter at all, and then in spring, back to fresh greens like dandelion and asparagus after the meat-heavy winter. That was pretty thought-provoking -- that minus the technology that makes it possible to buy mangoes at Whole Foods in Nebraska in the middle of winter, there are times of the year when one is closer to a vegetarian and others when one is closer to meat only.

1
510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20888)

on January 04, 2013
at 03:55 PM

The first half was pretty good and fit with most of my philosophy of eating real food and it really worked well with the paleo approach. They were careful about mentioning meat, but I think that's because the market they were going after was more vegetarian. However the second half quickly turned into woo and started talking about extreme juicing and "toxins" and all the other hippie stuff. It quickly lost all credibility in my mind. Until that part, I was going to recommend it for friends and family, but now I won't because I don't want them putting the same credibility on the juicing and nonsense as the first part which was really good.

1
50a12c595436b7620224676a2ae4acb9

(128)

on January 04, 2013
at 03:48 PM

I was actually going to post a similar question, as I watched this film only a few days ago. I think this film is a good starting point for someone who is trying to change their diet. That is, it paints with broad strokes and emphasizes ideas that are just now catching on in the mainstream, i.e. "whole foods", "grass-fed beef". A film like this would certainly bring these ideas more to the forefront. The shocking facts in the film, especially all the points made about sugar, are not so shocking to me or PaleoHacks, because it's old news. To someone eating SAD, it is.

As to the whole grains and beans issue presented, again, it goes back to baby steps. Eating whole grains and beans is the step in the right direction. It's a lot easier to get someone to switch from white bread to wheat bread, get into a healthier mind set, and then drop bread all together. And actually the film didn't seem to focus on much on what people could do to change, other than mention whole foods, eating seasonal etc. I think this was one of the weaker points in the film. It does a good job of explaining the problem, but not so much how to fix it. I clearly wasn't the target audience for the film, but it's something I may sneak into my parent's netflix queue.

1
A905679417ee71c3f9e2d88964b3b1f0

(368)

on January 04, 2013
at 09:10 AM

I have actually seen it twice. They basically preach eating like out ancestors much like the paleo diet with the addition of juicing. It is mostly about avoiding manufactured foods and eating real veggies less fruit and natural animal fat.

1
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19473)

on October 09, 2012
at 04:50 PM

Looking at their website, it almost certainly seems to be non-paleo, though they tell you to avoid MSG, artificial coloring, diet soda, etc.

There's no mention of avoiding gluten, soy, or anything like that that's the basis of the paleo diet - they do mention avoiding trans fats.

They mention avoiding nitrite - which we produce tons of in our saliva, and is present in celery.

They mention avoiding Potassium Bromate which is found in breads, but they don't mention the toxic hell of gluten/gliadin found in any wheat product and similar substances in other grains.

They do promote having juice every day, but it's vegetable juices - in that same article they mention the words "plant-powered diet" - wonder if this is another vegan propaganda machine movie.

I wouldn't go around advocating juicing, and it allows you to drink tons of carb calories, even from veggies, plus expose you to large amount of antinutrients such as oxelates if you down a lot of spinach juice.

They also mention detoxing, which has plenty of hyperbole around it.

There's also this gem: "Your body is connected to a healing stream of energy (also known as chi, prana, light, Source, and God) that you can absorb at will" which points to woo fluffy bunnies and white light mystical BS that goes hand in hand with veganism and hippies.

The trailers show a PostIt(tm) Note that has a shopping list of spirulina, chia seeds, aloe vera, things that would be marginally paleo at best. Not one visual of any kind of meat, only veggies, juicing (with celery no less, see above for nitrates), and water.

"How do you cook raw food? I thought 'vegan' was a planet" LOL.

If you look carefully at the text around the video boxes (book trailer @1:35), they say stuff like "vegetables, fruit, nuts, healthy oils (olive, fish, avocado, and coconut)" - sounds paleo, right? But the next line right after, "and small amounts of whole grains, beans and lean animal proteins, including wild-caught fish, organic grass fed meats, and organic eggs" So right there, beans and grains, just the things to avoid are included on this thing. Worse, whole grains, so you get all the anti-nutrients! Thanks, but no thanks. Well, at least it's not a vegan promotion, and obviously, you want the animal fats from wild caught fats and pastured, grass-fed ruminants - and not in small amounts - in proper portions, so again, not paleo at all. A bit better than SAD, but not optimal by any stretch.

I'd be very skeptical of this stuff. I'd say don't waste any time/money/energy on this stuff at all. The quote in the trailer about "Food like Products", sugar, diet soda, high fructose corn syrup, etc. is spot on, the rest is likely to be cattle manure - CAFO cattle at that.

Aa748fb43334ffd2db3934aa00874bbe

(458)

on October 09, 2012
at 06:11 PM

LOL @... "There's also this gem: "Your body is connected to a healing stream of energy (also known as chi, prana, light, Source, and God) that you can absorb at will" which points to woo fluffy bunnies and white light mystical BS that goes hand in hand with veganism and hippies."

0
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on January 04, 2013
at 01:37 PM

I haven't yet watched it, I noticed it was available on Netflix.

As I understand, it's sort of a sequel to Food Matters. That's an arguably paleo movie, they're certainly not "PALEO, FUCK YEAH!" but paleo principles amongst others are presented. Lots of good info in there, there's some wacky stuff as well. I wouldn't recommend it to somebody who isn't critical of what they see, read and hear.

I imagine that Hungry For Change will be a similar movie. I'll watch it this weekend and report back.

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