1

votes

Managing refueling and hunger in endurance training

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 10, 2012 at 7:36 PM

Hi everyone,

I'm a serious runner and have been for a long time. I don't plan on giving it up since I am passionate about the sport and do it for the love of it.
I know endurance training increases hunger and massive carb spikes also increase hunger as well. I am wondering if anyone has advice on how to manage hunger levels. I know the classic strategy is to eat more fats, etc. but I also notice that when I do this, my carb intake decreases and affects my training and performance.

Thus far, I've been trying to strike a balance and "fill up" on bulky vegetables to get my fill of carbs and also maintain some hunger satiety. I add moderate amounts of fat and protein to this as well. But this leaves me feeling pretty uncomfortably full and a bit constipated from all the fibrous matter.

I figure though if I concentrate solely on eating large amounts of fat/protein, my carb intake will take a hit and my training will suffer...any ideas on how to balance refueling without feeling hungry all the time?

9bd33dab06ad6696b1b6a06aed818f05

(659)

on February 19, 2012
at 11:25 AM

That is a bloody good answer. +1

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on February 11, 2012
at 12:23 AM

Far as the "hunger" alone I'm not an endurance athlete, but reading the comments he relied on nuts and cream cheese.....I would probably go with coconut oil though.

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3 Answers

2
Ccacf7567273244733bc991af4ac42ed

on February 10, 2012
at 07:42 PM

There's a difference between training and performance. You don't need to tank up on carbs to train. Eating's over-rated. Your body isn't designed to run for long distances using the stomach as fuel storage. Get that fixed and you should find your performance doesn't do too badly either.

9bd33dab06ad6696b1b6a06aed818f05

(659)

on February 19, 2012
at 11:25 AM

That is a bloody good answer. +1

0
1f0e3d43da38ef9fc064e1dc514a3e0f

on February 11, 2012
at 02:56 AM

Check out writings by Dr. Phil Maffetone (most recent "Big Book of Endurance Training"). He has worked with many well-known athletes (Mark Allen, many time Kona Ironman winner, among others) to improve their conditioning and nutrition. He emphasizes the importance of building a strong aerobic base so your body can go faster while burning fat. He also believes in a low-carb (though not fully Paleo) diet. IMO, he was way ahead of his time when he began writing back in the 80's. According to his theories, following his plan will accustom your body to preferentially using fat during endurance training and thereby reduce your needs for carbs.

0
3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on February 11, 2012
at 12:19 AM

This fellas experience seems to indicate that the only thing training or even competing in ketosis reduces is your top end power....all other factors seemed to improve http://waroninsulin.com/how-a-low-carb-diet-affected-my-athletic-performance. As an endurance athlete I would suspect most of your race effort is not "top end power" related though.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on February 11, 2012
at 12:23 AM

Far as the "hunger" alone I'm not an endurance athlete, but reading the comments he relied on nuts and cream cheese.....I would probably go with coconut oil though.

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