1

votes

Horseback Riding

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created April 02, 2012 at 10:28 PM

Hi,

Does anyone own a horse? How do you take care of it? Feed? Train? Groom? Any paleo tips or tricks?

The generic feed is terrible, and so are mainstream horseback riding practices...

THANKS

6b6c938c368e7a135e74c468c9ed1189

(633)

on April 03, 2012
at 03:22 PM

I have a friend from Ecuador who laughs at how much tack we use to ride. He says when he was a boy growing up in the jungle, they would bring a piece of rope to his grandfather's ranch and tie a clove hitch around the horses' bottom jaw, then ride bareback using the ends of the rope as reins. I could see Grok doing this, and intend to try it some day soon!

Medium avatar

(4878)

on April 03, 2012
at 12:10 PM

Sara, it depends on the Bosal. But in the grand scheme of things they are less harsh than a rubber snaffle in the wrong hands. This is one of the reasons the "Natural" horse people use halters like this for so much of the initial training work: http://enlightenedhorsemanship.files.wordpress.com/2009/11/blue-rope-halter.jpg?w=206

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on April 03, 2012
at 11:38 AM

Marie, I remember the bosal bridles being controversial, because of the pressure applied to sensitive nose regions. Has that been debunked? ... It sort of reminds me of the halti debate with dogs: people think the haltis are more humane but it ends up tweaking the dogs' neck vertebrae.

Medium avatar

(4878)

on April 03, 2012
at 12:32 AM

And regarding Paleo horses...I'm assuming yours is barefoot, on pasture w/other horses, and you use a bosal bridle? Motion and socialization is VERY important to horse health, so no 12x12 stalls, please.

Medium avatar

(4878)

on April 03, 2012
at 12:29 AM

Eating veggies is very different from digesting them. Dogs are carnivores, first, but *may scavenge to survive. And, unless the veggies have been cooked, it is likely that they pass through their systems with little nutritional contribution. Ever pick grass stringers out of your dog's butt...yah, not much digestion going on thanks to the cellulose walls. Cats on the other hand ARE pure carnivores and as such should NEVER be fed kibble or a processed diet. (Ever wonder why cats have so much F.U.S and kidney problems? Yah, it's the kibble.)

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on April 02, 2012
at 11:50 PM

Yeah, but my 3 "carnivores" routinely eat grass and twigs and grab dropped veg/frt before I can bend over. :-)) As I said, I always treated my horses like dogs but they only tried to mooch my apples.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on April 02, 2012
at 11:49 PM

Yeah, but my 3 "carnivores" routinely eat grass and twigs and grab dropped veg/frt before I can bend over. :-)) As I said, I always treated my horses like dogs but they only tried to mooch my

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on April 02, 2012
at 11:36 PM

OK, sorry for being really off-topic now, but here's a link describing that dogs are carnivores: http://rawfed.com/myths/omnivores.html

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on April 02, 2012
at 11:34 PM

It is my understanding that dogs are non-obligate carnivores. They can be considered omnivorous in the sense that they can eat vegetable matter, but they are not true omnivores.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on April 02, 2012
at 11:01 PM

Dogs are omnivores?

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on April 02, 2012
at 10:46 PM

With respect, and it's only my opinion, it is different. Horses are ruminants and dogs--like us--are omnivores. There are similarities between the principles of feeding humans and dogs. I worked with horses for 25 years and they never asked for a piece of my bacon & egg sandwich.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on April 02, 2012
at 10:42 PM

We have a lot of posts about feeding our pets such as dogs, is this different? (I ask sincerely, not snarkily.)

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on April 02, 2012
at 10:37 PM

This would be a great question on the right forum; I'd Google "traditional horse care" or "optimal horse diet" etc. For here, though, I'm sorry but this is way off topic.

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4 Answers

1
6b6c938c368e7a135e74c468c9ed1189

on April 03, 2012
at 07:14 AM

Well, it should be obvious not to feed him oats;). Alfalfa is pretty high in ??3 so don't feel bad if this is your only option. Get as close to 'pastured' as possible and you should see some good results. You don't need to own 1000ac in Montana to have a healthy horse. Feed it good leafy alfalfa. Lunge it or turn it out daily so he can roll and run. Feed him lots of carrots and apples. Worms/deworming is always an issue so figure out how you can reduce the pharmaceuticals. Keep him mucked, brushed, picked, etc. and keep him learning/ mentally challenged and he'll be fine.

6b6c938c368e7a135e74c468c9ed1189

(633)

on April 03, 2012
at 03:22 PM

I have a friend from Ecuador who laughs at how much tack we use to ride. He says when he was a boy growing up in the jungle, they would bring a piece of rope to his grandfather's ranch and tie a clove hitch around the horses' bottom jaw, then ride bareback using the ends of the rope as reins. I could see Grok doing this, and intend to try it some day soon!

1
Ac1e55cf06c2180f4008ff01953d10dd

on April 03, 2012
at 01:00 AM

The real thing with horses is feeding them natural grasses, and raising them with great care for the animal, in a very traditional way, still practised by traditional pastoralist groups. This requires that you and the horse live in the countryside. Otherwise, you can't do it.

0
751d4c813cae6ffcd979dbc3b8975e41

(70)

on April 03, 2012
at 02:50 PM

LMF actually makes some decent feeds. And there are low carb feeds for horses who are insulin resistant. I think the biggest thing would be to find an organic hay (you can have them tested and a lot are grown with Monsanto seeds FYI and have all the protein and cab levels checked ect) the biggest thing is turnout. Horse are meant to be outside so if you can have a shelter or even some good hefty trees you should be fine. If you can find a vet who is also a chiro and an herbalist (Chinese medicine) you would be able to stay as natural as possible.

0
7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on April 02, 2012
at 10:41 PM

I used to ride in Pony Club and on the Arab show circuit. I'm not sure how healthy dried alfalfa is. It has more protein, being a legume, so it and oats are considered good for horses with high energy demands, but I would expect a diet of fresh grasses and herbs are better.

As for training and riding practices: I agree with you. We totally railroad horses with typical "breaking" techniques, forsaking the relationship aspect which is important for social animals. When I was riding I played around a bit with bareback, bit-less riding. My favorite book was Horse, Follow Closely by Gawani Pony Boy. I highly recommend it. One girl in my barn trained her horse to turn right or left based on how she shifted her sit bones. There's a lot you can do.

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