2

votes

Does Paleo help with luteal phase deficits or defects?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 03, 2012 at 8:40 PM

So a friend asked me about this, and I really didn't know what to tell her. Thanks in advance for your help!

Anyone have any experience treating luteal phase defects and/or deficits with Paleo in women? Did Paleo fix it for your and/or your patients?

What recommendations:

Supplements?

Nutrition?

Medications?

Hormones?

Testing?

Does sleep/circadian rhythms play a role?

Stress?

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on August 04, 2012
at 01:20 AM

Pete~ I only offer nutrition coaching and make suggestions to clients for further research re: herbs & bioidentical hormones that are available OTC. My personal & client experience is that this is not really a difficult situation to remedy nutritionally. It just takes patience & knowledge that most ob/gyns do not possess.

  • 8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e

    asked by

    (6244)
  • Views
    1.9K
  • Last Activity
    1285D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

2 Answers

3
Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on August 03, 2012
at 10:04 PM

Luteal phase deficits are generally due to a hormonal imbalance, either low Progesterone or estrogen dominance.

Sufficient D3 (60-80 ng/ml blood level), Magnesium, Zinc and other minerals can help significantly, and it will likely take 3-6 months for a change to be seen.

Sleep & stress are also key, as is avoiding xenoestrogens in the home environment.

Chasteberry extract or natural Progesterone cream can be helpful, but I prefer to suggest these only after trying dietary changes (largely because getting hormones balanced is largely about nutrient repletion and maintaining a healthy pregnancy relies on good nutrition.)

Saliva testing is recommended for sex hormones, rather than blood tests. But you need a blood test for D3.

0
1e332901d2e54a4b539cb0630891516e

on September 07, 2013
at 12:44 AM

Howdy, This is an issue that should be handled by an OB/GYN. The treatment course may involve hormone replacement/suplementation.

Dragonfly: I would be hesitant to give medical advice over the interweb.

Balancing hormones is not so easy. The follicular phase of the menstrual cycle is driven by estrogens so I would ask which xenoestrogens should be avoided: antagonists and or agonists or maybe the problem is with androgens or even the pituitary. I can't answer the question and I have some expertise in the area of endocrine disruption.

Saliva is not necessarily the specimen of choice unlews you are interested in estriol to determine risk for pre-term labor.

Here's my advice: see a good OB/GYN.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on August 04, 2012
at 01:20 AM

Pete~ I only offer nutrition coaching and make suggestions to clients for further research re: herbs & bioidentical hormones that are available OTC. My personal & client experience is that this is not really a difficult situation to remedy nutritionally. It just takes patience & knowledge that most ob/gyns do not possess.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!