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sugar substitute

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 17, 2013 at 4:21 AM

Is 100% pure honey considered paleo or does it need to be raw honey?

3ec1b1b21c5b8ca332262822ae82be22

(482)

on May 18, 2013
at 09:05 AM

Interesting... goes to show the little tricks manufacturers use. I don't buy honey from the grocery store anyway; I don't even buy it at all but thanks for the info :-) BTW I don't recommend consuming manuka honey a lot (unless you can afford it) but it's great for medicinal purposes.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on May 17, 2013
at 11:55 AM

All honey you buy -- from the grocery store to the bee-stung apiary attendant at your small town local farmer's market has been "processed".

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on May 17, 2013
at 11:55 AM

All honey you buy -- from the grocery store to the bee-stung apiary attendant at your small town local farmer's market has been processed. "*Raw*", in the context of honey, means that it hasn't been heated above 120 degrees Fahrenheit or so, but it has been heated, and it has been "*processed*". Raw honey contains bee parts, can contains larval remains, and other misc bits -- if you don't see these, it's been processed. ;-) I find the term misleading, but it may not have been heated above 120, so it might be "raw". (Would you call an apple "raw" that was heated to just under 120F, though?)

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on May 17, 2013
at 11:54 AM

All honey you buy -- from the grocery store to the bee-stung apiary attendant at your small town local farmer's market has been processed. "*Raw*", in the context of honey, means that it hasn't been heated above 120 degrees Fahrenheit or so, but it has been heated, and it has been "*processed*". Raw honey contains bee parts, can contains larval remains, and other misc bits -- if you don't see these, it's been processed. ;-) I find the term misleading, but it may not have been heated above 120, so it might be "raw". (Would you call an apple "raw" that was heated to just under 120F, though?)

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on May 17, 2013
at 11:52 AM

**All** honey you buy -- from the grocery store to the bee-stung apiary attendant at your small town local farmer's market has been processed. "*Raw*", in the context of honey, means that it hasn't been heated above 120 degrees Fahrenheit or so, but it *has* been heated, and it *has* been "*processed*". Raw honey contains bee parts, can contains larval remains, and other misc bits -- if you don't see these, it's not raw. ;-)

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on May 17, 2013
at 05:45 AM

Needs to be raw, (ideally local) and even then you'll want to go easy on it. If it's not raw, then it's been processed. You want to avoid processed sugars. (I love the organic Y.S. honey.)

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2 Answers

1
34a31e6e59ee73ac7ddfd96c3e653919

on May 17, 2013
at 08:28 AM

/\ dont waste your money eating manuka, save it for wounds, sore thoats etc. I wouldnt worry too much about eating honey that isnt raw, i mean if your ever going to cook with it, it wont matter. Still though raw honey is the best.

theres also fruit pastes like rasins and dates, coconut palm sugar, lucemea, and maple to name a few...

1
3ec1b1b21c5b8ca332262822ae82be22

on May 17, 2013
at 06:06 AM

I'm sure honey is paleo; although it should be raw, which means hasn't been processed and many of the benefits are still present. I would say manuka honey is probably the best type of honey you could get. With that said you still should go easy on it, it's still a form of sugar.

3ec1b1b21c5b8ca332262822ae82be22

(482)

on May 18, 2013
at 09:05 AM

Interesting... goes to show the little tricks manufacturers use. I don't buy honey from the grocery store anyway; I don't even buy it at all but thanks for the info :-) BTW I don't recommend consuming manuka honey a lot (unless you can afford it) but it's great for medicinal purposes.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on May 17, 2013
at 11:55 AM

All honey you buy -- from the grocery store to the bee-stung apiary attendant at your small town local farmer's market has been processed. "*Raw*", in the context of honey, means that it hasn't been heated above 120 degrees Fahrenheit or so, but it has been heated, and it has been "*processed*". Raw honey contains bee parts, can contains larval remains, and other misc bits -- if you don't see these, it's been processed. ;-) I find the term misleading, but it may not have been heated above 120, so it might be "raw". (Would you call an apple "raw" that was heated to just under 120F, though?)

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