5

votes

Paleo super food or sugary indulgence? Honey

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created October 06, 2012 at 11:26 PM

Whats the view on honey? If you're wanting to eat Paleo then a few honey gorges per year would seem reasonable. My problem is acne, so I don't know how it differs from plain sugar from a metabolic standpoint.

I've seen a lot of anecdotal stuff about how bee keepers tend to live long.

Also does anyone have any information about any communities of people that will eat another food before honey that is available? from what i read, honey is and will always be eaten first.

And my final question. I can get a variety of types of honey and without being finicky and reading too much into it, there are about a billion types of the stuff. I think that it might be interesting to try still in the comb.

I'm also cautiously raising the idea that these refeeds might somehow be beneficial

68294383ced9a0eafc16133aa80d1905

(5795)

on October 07, 2012
at 10:15 PM

Trying to put on weight. My PWO intake (within 3-5 hours) is usually about 1-2:1 carbs to protein. Yesterday, it was quite large. About 250 grams carbs, 200 grams of protein. About 150 of it came from the honey.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 07, 2012
at 07:22 PM

500-1000 calories of pure sugar (270g per cup). That seems...excessive. Why so much?

06ca9c524c28bc3fba95d4d90f8f43c6

on October 07, 2012
at 02:25 PM

@DJ, Another thing to go along with natural sugars, I never thought I would see the day when we couldn't keep dates in the pantry because we will eat them all!

06ca9c524c28bc3fba95d4d90f8f43c6

on October 07, 2012
at 02:25 PM

@plynesian_metal I guess I could put my brewmaster's hat on and goto work with the mentioned ingrediants :). You are right about the Mead, seems like it would be the closest thing.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on October 07, 2012
at 01:11 PM

Among the Hadza in Africa, honey is unanimously the preferred food source for both men and women. For men honey>meat>boabab>berries>tubers. FOr wome honey>berries>boabab>meat>tubers. Wherever honey is a known food source among Hunter Gatherers, it is treated as liquid gold and they go to great lengths to secure it. http://www.bioanth.cam.ac.uk/fwm23/tubers_and_fallback_foods_21040_ftp.pdf

931a99246c4b901c8cabd52da1e9f6d2

(130)

on October 07, 2012
at 11:08 AM

So true about how great natural sugars now taste. Figs are my new treat, so sweet! It's so cool

0d0842381492a41b2173a04014aae810

(4875)

on October 07, 2012
at 06:49 AM

Me too. One taste almost always leads to me eating the entire 16oz jar.

47edf681280750c3712a3a56f2eae33b

on October 07, 2012
at 06:34 AM

That is a serious recipe for some party but in all seriousness I try to avoid all sweeteners because of what you say. If I'm obsessing over wanting it and telling myself I can't, the obsession wins. I think obsessions may signal bodily needs. I work out a lot and maintain my weight and trust myself enough to go with the instinct of need based hungers.

47edf681280750c3712a3a56f2eae33b

on October 07, 2012
at 06:33 AM

Paleo beer: That's a good one. Something like Mead? Honey Coconut Pumpkin Canabeer by Anchor Steam for the Holiday. YAH???

68294383ced9a0eafc16133aa80d1905

(5795)

on October 07, 2012
at 05:24 AM

Haha, it was probably closer to half a cup, maybe a bit more. I usually do 4-6 tablespoons in my shake and then another 4-6 on chicken and sweet potatoes later. It's really the only pure carbohydrate I use...

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 07, 2012
at 02:45 AM

A CUP? REALLY? Wow.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on October 07, 2012
at 01:43 AM

Greensun, local, unpasteurized honey is a better bet than ordering it from Amazon.

E8c2167284f0cdd16a12bea2741975b4

(476)

on October 07, 2012
at 12:53 AM

I wasn't intending on buying it in a supermarket. Amazon sells honey thats still in the comb that I wanted to try.

68294383ced9a0eafc16133aa80d1905

(5795)

on October 07, 2012
at 12:51 AM

Worthington. Suburb of Columbus. I believe the farm is in Johnstown, OH.

Cbe1731034411e1ce373cdc62e7d4eef

(65)

on October 07, 2012
at 12:48 AM

Findley Market? Cincinnati?

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11 Answers

5
1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

on October 07, 2012
at 01:05 PM

The two are not mutually exclusive- it can be both a paleo superfood AND a sugary indulgence.

An unfortunate aspect of Paleo is that it tends to be black and white very often. For instance, eggs are good so we must eat them (in not insignificant quantities) everyday to maximize our health. Saturated fat is healthy so we must pour butter in our coffee and eat spoonfuls of (coconut) oil. Eexcess carbs cause weight gain so VLC is better, yada yada yada etc etc. (It would come as no surprise to me if the people who take paleo to the extremes like that are not also the same people who took govt recommendations to the extreme- too many carbs and calories - and might just be repeating the same mistake twice).

I am personally of the view that honey proved to be a valuable food source in our evolutionary past and is likely not harmful in any way if one eats small amounts daily or larger amounts sporatically (given an otherwise balanced diet).

I personally do choose to consume honey.

3
089dd41b18fbb95ebb5347cded708d98

(5635)

on October 07, 2012
at 12:39 AM

i don't eat honey because it brings out a binging/addictive quality in me. i used to only eat fruit covered in various syrups like maple, agave, brown rice, honey, yacon. now i just enjoy fruit as it is. i don't use any syrups or honey in my baking since i find fruit is so sweet without it.

if you find that you can just eat it sparingly, then i don't see a problem with it.

0d0842381492a41b2173a04014aae810

(4875)

on October 07, 2012
at 06:49 AM

Me too. One taste almost always leads to me eating the entire 16oz jar.

3
00cd3b6f51530a6832fcda1712edbec3

(2411)

on October 07, 2012
at 12:06 AM

The answer depends, in part, on whether you're actually getting true honey. Like olive oil, honey's become a magnet for business people who want to cheapen it by watering it down, mixing it with sugar, removing the pollen to make it clearer, and making chemical substitutions for the actual food. Assuming you can find the real thing (you can test your honey for sugar adulteration yourself), it's still a simple carbohydrate, made of glucose and fructose. The body will seize on any glucose you eat and use it for fuel in preference to fats, but a small amount should be OK for a normal/healed metabolism. A healthy liver can metabolize a small amount of fructose.

This topic's been addressed before, and you might want to read the web site that's linked on that page.

If you're still early in your paleo journey, I suggest playing it safe and avoiding honey or sugar until you have evidence that your body's recovered from the Standard American Diet.

E8c2167284f0cdd16a12bea2741975b4

(476)

on October 07, 2012
at 12:53 AM

I wasn't intending on buying it in a supermarket. Amazon sells honey thats still in the comb that I wanted to try.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on October 07, 2012
at 01:43 AM

Greensun, local, unpasteurized honey is a better bet than ordering it from Amazon.

2
06ca9c524c28bc3fba95d4d90f8f43c6

on October 07, 2012
at 12:52 AM

A cool thing about removing the processed sugars from your diet is how good natural sugars become and how little it takes to get great taste. Examples: Watermelon tastes just like candy to me now.

In regards to honey, raw honey untouched by processing and other unsavory practices is the best way to go. I use it as an occasional treat and make glazes for various dishes from it (chicken, etc.). For football tomorrow, I'll be making Hot Honey Glazed Baked Wings, which are always a hit. What's more Paleo than Beer, Wings, and Football? (I'm still working on the Paleo beer, not making any progress, but open to suggestions, at least there's bacon).

Enjoy your honey in moderation, if it's a trigger or gateway food, keep it out of the house. There are certain cultures (specific names escape me) that absolutely REVERE honey and treat it as such.

Matt
PhysiqueRescue.com

47edf681280750c3712a3a56f2eae33b

on October 07, 2012
at 06:34 AM

That is a serious recipe for some party but in all seriousness I try to avoid all sweeteners because of what you say. If I'm obsessing over wanting it and telling myself I can't, the obsession wins. I think obsessions may signal bodily needs. I work out a lot and maintain my weight and trust myself enough to go with the instinct of need based hungers.

06ca9c524c28bc3fba95d4d90f8f43c6

on October 07, 2012
at 02:25 PM

@DJ, Another thing to go along with natural sugars, I never thought I would see the day when we couldn't keep dates in the pantry because we will eat them all!

47edf681280750c3712a3a56f2eae33b

on October 07, 2012
at 06:33 AM

Paleo beer: That's a good one. Something like Mead? Honey Coconut Pumpkin Canabeer by Anchor Steam for the Holiday. YAH???

931a99246c4b901c8cabd52da1e9f6d2

(130)

on October 07, 2012
at 11:08 AM

So true about how great natural sugars now taste. Figs are my new treat, so sweet! It's so cool

06ca9c524c28bc3fba95d4d90f8f43c6

on October 07, 2012
at 02:25 PM

@plynesian_metal I guess I could put my brewmaster's hat on and goto work with the mentioned ingrediants :). You are right about the Mead, seems like it would be the closest thing.

2
3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on October 07, 2012
at 12:24 AM

Well as to your questions....honey is a limited indulgence, both in my way of eating and in a HG sense. I definitely prefer it over sugar in my coffee.

As to your questions on communities of peoples and honey....are bees indigenous to all zones of human tribes? You can live just fine without any of it obviously, but I'm not going to be the one to tell you that you "have" to.

The only kind I buy is local raw and unfiltered.

1
Ef26f888ed248de197c37a4cb04ef4a7

on October 25, 2012
at 11:31 AM

I put it in the same category as added fats or cooking oils. In fact I'd probably put it before both of them as not only is it more 'paleo' but probably even more nutritious. Should you pour it over everything you eat like people do with butter and coconut oil? Probably not such a good idea.

1
47edf681280750c3712a3a56f2eae33b

on October 07, 2012
at 06:39 AM

If you are really obsessed you need it so bad and want it to the point where it is your main concern, just do it. Buy the best honey you can afford and apply it till its gone, then move on. Obsession satisfied. Revisit when ready.

1
3228f776e86815bf674a672fc312c4ff

on October 07, 2012
at 01:45 AM

I like the raw buckwheat version. An occasional post workout reward for me is a banana mashed with a tbsp of honey and a gloob of almond butter.

1
68294383ced9a0eafc16133aa80d1905

(5795)

on October 07, 2012
at 12:38 AM

I just had a cup of it post-workout today. One great thing we can get in Ohio, raw honey. My farmer's market this morning had 5 different raw honey stands.

68294383ced9a0eafc16133aa80d1905

(5795)

on October 07, 2012
at 05:24 AM

Haha, it was probably closer to half a cup, maybe a bit more. I usually do 4-6 tablespoons in my shake and then another 4-6 on chicken and sweet potatoes later. It's really the only pure carbohydrate I use...

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 07, 2012
at 02:45 AM

A CUP? REALLY? Wow.

68294383ced9a0eafc16133aa80d1905

(5795)

on October 07, 2012
at 10:15 PM

Trying to put on weight. My PWO intake (within 3-5 hours) is usually about 1-2:1 carbs to protein. Yesterday, it was quite large. About 250 grams carbs, 200 grams of protein. About 150 of it came from the honey.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 07, 2012
at 07:22 PM

500-1000 calories of pure sugar (270g per cup). That seems...excessive. Why so much?

68294383ced9a0eafc16133aa80d1905

(5795)

on October 07, 2012
at 12:51 AM

Worthington. Suburb of Columbus. I believe the farm is in Johnstown, OH.

Cbe1731034411e1ce373cdc62e7d4eef

(65)

on October 07, 2012
at 12:48 AM

Findley Market? Cincinnati?

1
2e5dc29c61f97d335ffb990508424719

on October 06, 2012
at 11:44 PM

We have a long evolutionary history with honey. Unfortunately it was acquired rarely so do not consider it a daily or even weekly food. Modern filtered or pasteurized honey is just a fructose cocktail so stay away from that and concentrate on raw honey. Raw honey is still loaded with fructose (and other sugars) and this is not good. So what is good? Locally sourced is loaded with pollen and other substances that will stimulate your immune system in a good way. Bottom line, occasional indulgence is fine. If you make this a daily occurance you may experience leptin resistance, tooth decay, and all the other bad stuff that comes from carbohydrate consumption.

0
32d059a467e99a4fc83201407a4a238d

on October 07, 2012
at 01:25 PM

Just remember not to bake with raw honey. I mean, you can, but you're basically pasteurizing it. Ruins all the good stuff! :)

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