2

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Histamines and Grass Fed Beef . . .

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 24, 2012 at 12:00 PM

  1. For my paleo peeps who have problems with histamines, I presume there's nothing magical about grass fed beef vs. conventional. From a histamine perspective, beef is beef, right?

  2. After reading up on the subject, on paper at least, I'd suspect that beef should be avoided (grassed or otherwise) because it's intentionally aged about 3 weeks. Then, when you factor in travel and logistics, beef could be a month old by the time you see it on the supermarket shelves.

In contrast, chicken is NOT intentionally aged, so it's is pretty much 3-11 days old by the time you see on your shelves.

Is that borne out in your real world experience?

Thanks, Mike

22fd82abf435768244f8d074430cd1e6

(590)

on May 25, 2012
at 08:08 AM

Yes it was quite similar for me. I was diagnosed with histamine intolerance as a kid when I had severe urticaria, but it was only a few weeks ago that I re-connected the pieces as well. Avoiding high histamine foods is a savior...

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 24, 2012
at 06:19 PM

BTW, is there a good histamine intolerance support group on the web somewhere? (I found one, but it gets like 3 posts/year).

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 24, 2012
at 04:24 PM

It wasn't until just recently that I put all the pieces together. I'm sure it's different for different people, but it builds, day after day as I was unintentionally eating high histamine foods as paleo staples. Initial symptoms of moderate exposure were headache, sneezing, congestion, itchy, watery eyes. Ultimately, it progressed to terrible skin rash. Once I stop eating that stuff, everything starts getting abruptly better. Still waiting to see how long before I'm at absolute baseline.

F0e558010a2ecb31fa37b7c491596b8e

(3850)

on May 24, 2012
at 03:05 PM

That does make sense. However, there's aged and "aged". Buying it frozen direct from the farm seems to have no issues for me. Start talking to the farmers. Also, I always rinse meat before cooking, as I read that histamines on raw meat tend to form at the surface.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 24, 2012
at 02:28 PM

Thanks @Roberto for mentioning the histamines in chicken skin. From a paleo perspective, the unfavorable N6 ratio is reason enough to avoid it. Now that I know it's high in histamines, that seems like a logical thing for me to avoid!!!

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 24, 2012
at 02:26 PM

Thanks Kelly. According to Mr. Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beef#Aging_and_tenderization pretty much all beef would be aged or it would be very tough. Ironically, fancy steaks at premium steak houses would be aged longer. That does seem to correlated to my recollection of particularly bad reactions going to the local fancy steak place. Good thing I don't make that a habit !!!

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2 Answers

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1
22fd82abf435768244f8d074430cd1e6

(590)

on May 24, 2012
at 01:41 PM

Dear Mike, I am histamine intolerant and I find that beef in general is not that big of a problem. In that context though lamb would be better in terms of freshness (for chicken it seems that the skin is high in histamine).

As far as I understand though (and from my experience), histamines are formed much more quickly when the proteins are cooked (such as in leftovers). Also sometimes grass fed could even be worse as it is often sold in vacuum packs that should be avoided (the meat is very old in this case). Plain grass-fed versus conventional I am not sure there would be a difference if treated the same way.

Histamine intolerance is really annoying. Also I do not seem to react the same way to histamine in different foods, i.e. I get more mouth canker sores with tomatoes or eggplant, while I get HUGELY bloated with smoked salmon or redwine (and in need for a toilet.. quickly). Some other times I get hitchy. When I was a kid I used to get severe urticaria (that's when I was diagnosed actually).

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 24, 2012
at 02:28 PM

Thanks @Roberto for mentioning the histamines in chicken skin. From a paleo perspective, the unfavorable N6 ratio is reason enough to avoid it. Now that I know it's high in histamines, that seems like a logical thing for me to avoid!!!

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 24, 2012
at 04:24 PM

It wasn't until just recently that I put all the pieces together. I'm sure it's different for different people, but it builds, day after day as I was unintentionally eating high histamine foods as paleo staples. Initial symptoms of moderate exposure were headache, sneezing, congestion, itchy, watery eyes. Ultimately, it progressed to terrible skin rash. Once I stop eating that stuff, everything starts getting abruptly better. Still waiting to see how long before I'm at absolute baseline.

22fd82abf435768244f8d074430cd1e6

(590)

on May 25, 2012
at 08:08 AM

Yes it was quite similar for me. I was diagnosed with histamine intolerance as a kid when I had severe urticaria, but it was only a few weeks ago that I re-connected the pieces as well. Avoiding high histamine foods is a savior...

1
F0e558010a2ecb31fa37b7c491596b8e

(3850)

on May 24, 2012
at 01:40 PM

Check with your sources. I get most of my beef and lamb frozen from the farms. Since they butcher as needed, I don't think they age the beef much before freezing. I've never had a problem eating grass-fed meat purchased that way, like I have buying unfrozen from a grocery store.

F0e558010a2ecb31fa37b7c491596b8e

(3850)

on May 24, 2012
at 03:05 PM

That does make sense. However, there's aged and "aged". Buying it frozen direct from the farm seems to have no issues for me. Start talking to the farmers. Also, I always rinse meat before cooking, as I read that histamines on raw meat tend to form at the surface.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 24, 2012
at 02:26 PM

Thanks Kelly. According to Mr. Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beef#Aging_and_tenderization pretty much all beef would be aged or it would be very tough. Ironically, fancy steaks at premium steak houses would be aged longer. That does seem to correlated to my recollection of particularly bad reactions going to the local fancy steak place. Good thing I don't make that a habit !!!

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