1

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Why is High Protein/Mod Fat/Low Carb considered harmful?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 29, 2011 at 5:56 PM

SInce my 2nd questions got edited out of my previous question...."One question per thread please. I removed the other question. ??? Melissa- Hunt Gather Love??? 2 hours ago"

Why is High Protein/Mod Fat/Low Carb considered harmful?

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on March 30, 2011
at 05:53 AM

@KL it might be more accurate to say that an excess of anything turns into fat (as DePaw has said), but the significant difference is what happens along the way. A slab of animal fat just gets added to your own animal fat pretty directly, protein only turns into fat via a stressful metabolic process in the liver turning it to glucose and glucose only turns to fat after having raised your blood sugar, glycated a few things and raised your insulin. The fat (or protein) also do it while sating you for a few hours, whereas the carbs may well make you hungrier than you were before.

B8592e62f9804ddabae73c1103d6bcb9

(1956)

on March 29, 2011
at 08:26 PM

No excess fat is stored as fat, and protein with turn into glucose or ketones depending on the amino acid. Excess glucose, with full liver glycogen, will turn to fat for storage. Excess ketones are excreted in urine. So excess will end up as fat or pee eventually.

9055f14c31610afd4d3068ec48eb6d90

(984)

on March 29, 2011
at 07:20 PM

This may be a silly question...but doesn't a excess of anything turn into glucose. Excess of protein or excess of fat etc...

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on March 29, 2011
at 06:48 PM

Although wouldn't "big" (no matter the macronutrient composition) meals also effect insuline ?

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on March 29, 2011
at 06:10 PM

Thanks so much!

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1 Answers

3
E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on March 29, 2011
at 06:27 PM

Assuming you're interested in the high protein element of the above formula, I can only observe that excess protein will increase insulin, IGF and cortisol and lowers testosterone. There's a good summary here. There are really few benefits to consuming excess protein by definition (defining excess as whatever you need to keep in nitrogen balance and therefore be able to sustain repair). The excess can only be turned to glucose and thence to fat. The benefits of consuming excess protein are primarily: increased satiety allowing you to eat less of everything else, making sure you get enough protein (in the absence of the ability to measure needs perfectly), increasing insulin, IGF, mTOR etc relative to fat if you want to increase growth at the cost of more fat gain, higher cancer risk etc and increasing cortisol if you want to increase gluconeogenesis and raise and maintain blood sugar if, for example, you want to be artificially alert and don't handle carbs well or to offset low blood sugar as a consequence of eating carbs.

9055f14c31610afd4d3068ec48eb6d90

(984)

on March 29, 2011
at 07:20 PM

This may be a silly question...but doesn't a excess of anything turn into glucose. Excess of protein or excess of fat etc...

B8592e62f9804ddabae73c1103d6bcb9

(1956)

on March 29, 2011
at 08:26 PM

No excess fat is stored as fat, and protein with turn into glucose or ketones depending on the amino acid. Excess glucose, with full liver glycogen, will turn to fat for storage. Excess ketones are excreted in urine. So excess will end up as fat or pee eventually.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on March 29, 2011
at 06:48 PM

Although wouldn't "big" (no matter the macronutrient composition) meals also effect insuline ?

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on March 30, 2011
at 05:53 AM

@KL it might be more accurate to say that an excess of anything turns into fat (as DePaw has said), but the significant difference is what happens along the way. A slab of animal fat just gets added to your own animal fat pretty directly, protein only turns into fat via a stressful metabolic process in the liver turning it to glucose and glucose only turns to fat after having raised your blood sugar, glycated a few things and raised your insulin. The fat (or protein) also do it while sating you for a few hours, whereas the carbs may well make you hungrier than you were before.

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