8

votes

Relearning everything...What's a vegetarian to do?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 15, 2012 at 4:18 AM

I have been a vegetarian since I was 12 years old, roughly 24 years. I became a vegetarian for one reason and one reason only- meat grossed me out. I remember riding in the shopping cart in the supermarket as a child and seeing the whole headless skinless bloody cows hanging I'm the butcher window and being traumatized by it.

Then my vegetarianism was further reinforced by the idea that it was ultra healthy.

Here's the problem. I have now learned that EVERYTHING I thought was healthy is actually not healthy! Soy, canola oil, whole grains!

I am ready to repent my SAD way of life and turn over a new leaf. The problem is that I honestly don't know if I can bring myself to eat meat! I want to, but I am not sure I can.

I also am a little confused on why legumes are unhealthy?

I need some help and support giving up my vegetarian lifestyle, so I am meekly asking y'all for some help.

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on July 21, 2012
at 03:55 AM

Eh, to each their own. I have three friends who could tolerate no animal Protiens but chicken or white, mild fish for about six months; other meats made them violently sick.

54f75fb54778cfa947990bec1175307a

(665)

on July 17, 2012
at 05:52 AM

I imagine hunter gatherers had access to meat for the most of the year, while fruits and vegetables were available only occasionally if at all (e.g. for inuits) Many people have problems with fresh fruits and vegetables.

C0d44d0c62dcf60e8a80ae21411ddeb9

(370)

on July 16, 2012
at 06:13 PM

where are you getting this "information", blitherakt?

C0d44d0c62dcf60e8a80ae21411ddeb9

(370)

on July 16, 2012
at 06:11 PM

@ blither: no.

C0d44d0c62dcf60e8a80ae21411ddeb9

(370)

on July 16, 2012
at 06:08 PM

this answer is completely wrong. (sorry blither) not one sentence resonates *at all* with my experience, except the last one. "easing into meat" with chicken is a ludicrous concept. chicken *is* meat and not the most delicious either; blech. i say don't bother with it at all.

9beda76f4e91faedc8fa70ecdc01251e

(298)

on July 16, 2012
at 05:39 PM

Technically, chickens don't eat grass. I have raised layers and meat chickens, and they will eat some little leaves, but they really like bugs. Also snakes, frogs, even mice. Think very small velociraptors. They are actually terrifying creatures! :)

7eba3d743671649c1e06cacce0ba4e77

(1423)

on July 16, 2012
at 07:25 AM

Luluandmrbear - I'm thinking your body might react because think about it, you have been vegetarian for 24 years! Your gut bacteria is going to be different. Also your stomach acid level might be different. I was only vegetarian and then raw vegan for a short time compared to you and when I had my first meal with meat, holy shit did it give me digestive issues. Well maybe I'm exaggerating a little but I think I didn't have enough stomach acid. Maybe to ease your way into it, you can take hydrochloric acid tablets when you decide to incorporate meat. Try something like chicken soup frst.

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on July 16, 2012
at 06:25 AM

I get that salmon is über healthy, but wouldn't that be a tad rich for somebody who hasn't had animal proteins or fats for 24 years?

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on July 16, 2012
at 06:21 AM

Healthwise the Omega 3 in Salmon will provide much neeed nutrients and Fish is often a good bridge food.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on July 16, 2012
at 06:12 AM

A soup based on chicken stock, with little bits of meat, and bunch of veggies sounds like a great place to start!

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on July 16, 2012
at 04:33 AM

Don't get me wrong; I loves me some (OK, unhealthy amounts) of salmon... But a recovering veg/vegan onto a salmon diet? Seems kinda scary....

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on July 16, 2012
at 04:29 AM

You know, at the end of the day... Do whatever you feel comfortable doing. You have a tremendous transition to go through; if bacon, or chicken, or sea slugs gets you there, who am I to get in the way of it? You recognized thst the "paleo" lifestyle might help you out, so HOORAH! I'll (we all) help when we can, laugh when we must, and embrace you as one of our own.

9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

(15833)

on July 16, 2012
at 04:25 AM

I would say around once per day, eventually. If you have not had it for a while there will be an adaptation period, but eventually, your main meal of the day (you might cut back to one or two) will probably be based around meat, or some form of protein.

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on July 16, 2012
at 04:23 AM

I have no idea... If it doesn't, then enjoy ALL the proteins! But, given experiences with som friends, I think you're going to have a tough row to hoe getting from chicken to elk...

Medium avatar

(4878)

on July 16, 2012
at 04:23 AM

Ah, Salmon, such an easy beast. 10 mins at 425F per "inch". Measure the depth, and you'll get a great meal. Add salt and lemon...Yum...or you could do my famous Salmon Curry: 1 tsp curry, 1TBS sugar, a dash of salt and a dash of ground pepper, cover the top liberally ... cook on Broil for, yes, 10 mins an inch. Eat with a big smile. Partners well with Kale and Kerrygold...

2979666c364c56e0fe3ba5f62c96826a

on July 16, 2012
at 04:07 AM

May I ask how often you think I should eat meat?

2979666c364c56e0fe3ba5f62c96826a

on July 16, 2012
at 04:04 AM

Do you really think my body will react? I had not thought anything different would happen...

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on July 16, 2012
at 03:59 AM

Really? I would think salmon would be quite a bit more challenging to the gut of somebody who hasn't had animal protein in 24 years. Not questioning the salmon (it's fantastic!), just the "learning cure".

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on July 16, 2012
at 03:47 AM

Not just the texture... The longer you go without eating animal protein, the more of the enzymes needed for good digestion disappear.

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on July 16, 2012
at 03:45 AM

The broth and soup suggestion is fantastic! A slow braise (making soup) tends to destroy the enzymes responsible for making the "meat-adverse" uncomfortable.

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on July 16, 2012
at 03:43 AM

Yeah, re-read the OP's question... While "MOAR BACON" is always valid in my world view, 24 years of soy-as-awesome-protein didn't mesh with the response...

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on July 16, 2012
at 03:22 AM

I find lamb can be a bit challenging for recovering Vegans... But Bacon is the true Caller of Truth. :)

C116f7e54620c6003b67cd4450a298cd

on July 16, 2012
at 01:09 AM

I love my grass fed EVERYTHING. in fact, tonight was roasted chicken, and the chicken is from our local rancher. We bought 6 in the late spring right at the height of all the good grass they were eating. Bone broth to follow. best way to consume your chicken if you can get it local - still kicking. :)'

41dfb1a4fecb38d24075ff52f13ccb28

on July 15, 2012
at 09:15 PM

I was just re-listening to Denise Minger's interview with Sean Croxton (he put it back up for today only, so check it out here before midnight: http://realfoodsummit.com/denise-minger/ ) and she suggested a site called Let Them Eat Meat (http://letthemeatmeat.com/) it made me think of this post. You might want to check it out.

Cd77fd01d8be999aa91b8678e262f419

(825)

on July 15, 2012
at 05:24 PM

@Luluandmrbear I eat meat every single day at pretty much every meal (sometimes I'll have an egg-based breakfast). After switching from vegetarian I ended up eating a lot of eggs and dairy as I adjusted, but cut out the soy immediately so I had to seek out more meat for protein. I feel way better than I did a year ago. Much higher energy, I can workout without hitting a wall, and my mood is lifted overall. I did also cut out processed foods at the same time I started eating meat, but I think rebalancing my diet around great sources of protein was the biggest change.

C45d7e96acd83d3a6f58193dbc140e86

on July 15, 2012
at 02:01 PM

Its at least good that you don't like chicken. Most vegetarians pick chicken as their first meat of choice when leaving the lifestyle. It is the worst!

Dc8ec73989c7b37c006f2031dd648a61

on July 15, 2012
at 11:30 AM

indeed @ TheRealThing; I've never been veggie/vegan but I feel a big responsibility in trying to source meat/fish without causing suffering... yes, these animals wouldn't have been brought into the world if it wasn't for us most likely (exception of wild fish), but at least I know they were well treated/happy through their lifes :)... good farmers will tell you proudly how they are treated and I have found they often show their animals to the public

3cdc762b2ae30b4ca3529f011ccac174

(186)

on July 15, 2012
at 05:54 AM

Every decent person is concerned with animal welfare, which is exactly the best reason to buy only from farmers you can know and trust to have the highest standards of humane care.

6714718e2245e5190017d643a7614157

on July 15, 2012
at 05:20 AM

We are all still learning. It takes time to sift through all the bad info to find out what is really the truth. But if you keep it simple and try to eat mainly fresh meat, fresh vegetables, and fresh fruit and avoid processed foods you'll be fine.

6714718e2245e5190017d643a7614157

on July 15, 2012
at 05:19 AM

We are all still learning. It takes time to sift through all the bad info to find out what is really the truth. But if you keep is simple and eat fresh meat, fresh vegetables, and fresh fruit and avoid processed foods you'll be fine.

2979666c364c56e0fe3ba5f62c96826a

on July 15, 2012
at 04:51 AM

Well thank you for not judging me, or thinking me a troll. I eat eggs but could never stand fish or seafood. I do sometimes crave steak. Thank y'all for your kindness.

2979666c364c56e0fe3ba5f62c96826a

on July 15, 2012
at 04:49 AM

well hallelujah! You were in my shoes, weren't you? So it can be done! I am a big softy when it comes to animals, so you and I are on the same page when it comes to animal welfare. I have read so many books and seen so many videos. Did you feel any different after eating meat, may I ask? And how often do you eat meat?

2979666c364c56e0fe3ba5f62c96826a

on July 15, 2012
at 04:46 AM

Honestly, I am thinking red meat. I never ever ate fish, and I don't like chicken, but I did eat a lot of steak, hotdogs and hamburgers as a kid. I also find the idea of kindly raised grass fed cattle appealing.

2979666c364c56e0fe3ba5f62c96826a

on July 15, 2012
at 04:29 AM

Thank you. Still in shock. Still learning. This looks like a great site to peruse.

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16 Answers

11
Cd77fd01d8be999aa91b8678e262f419

(825)

on July 15, 2012
at 04:40 AM

I was in the same boat as you a year ago. I'd "only" been vegetarian for 14 years, but I was well conditioned to just not at all want to eat meat. I had zero desire for it and some kinds completely put me off.

It took me some very small steps at first. I thought back to the two kinds of meat I did eat before I became vegetarian: chicken and fish. I started with a very small amount of fish. It was nice! I also had some bacon, at my husband's insistence, and it was nice too. Suddenly it got a lot easier and I started feeling a lot better overall, which helped continue the cycle. I tried vegetarian staples (caesar salad) with a bit of meat added. Sandwiches. etc. Yes, I wasn't paleo immediately on switching from vegetarianism; that would have been a bit much for me, but kudos if you can manage it.

You don't have to eat cow if you don't want to. I don't eat beef very much and I don't really like it. Pick grass-fed, pasture-raised animals and (if you can) talk to the farmer about how his livestock are kept, you can really get to appreciate where the food comes from. One of the reasons I went vegetarian was being traumatised by how badly these creatures were treated for the short period they were alive, and the fact they were only born in the first place to feed us. However, I've come to accept that this is the way nature works and that eating with nature, not against it, is the best route; plus, choosing only those animals that genuinely had a nice life and great treatment, even if I have to pay more.

It also helped me to really focus on understanding why these choices were healthy and visualise the difference between paleo and my unhealthy, high-carb high-soy vegetarian diet (what each does to my body and the key things missing from the vegetarian diet I was following). Looks like you're on the right track there.

2979666c364c56e0fe3ba5f62c96826a

on July 15, 2012
at 04:49 AM

well hallelujah! You were in my shoes, weren't you? So it can be done! I am a big softy when it comes to animals, so you and I are on the same page when it comes to animal welfare. I have read so many books and seen so many videos. Did you feel any different after eating meat, may I ask? And how often do you eat meat?

Dc8ec73989c7b37c006f2031dd648a61

on July 15, 2012
at 11:30 AM

indeed @ TheRealThing; I've never been veggie/vegan but I feel a big responsibility in trying to source meat/fish without causing suffering... yes, these animals wouldn't have been brought into the world if it wasn't for us most likely (exception of wild fish), but at least I know they were well treated/happy through their lifes :)... good farmers will tell you proudly how they are treated and I have found they often show their animals to the public

3cdc762b2ae30b4ca3529f011ccac174

(186)

on July 15, 2012
at 05:54 AM

Every decent person is concerned with animal welfare, which is exactly the best reason to buy only from farmers you can know and trust to have the highest standards of humane care.

Cd77fd01d8be999aa91b8678e262f419

(825)

on July 15, 2012
at 05:24 PM

@Luluandmrbear I eat meat every single day at pretty much every meal (sometimes I'll have an egg-based breakfast). After switching from vegetarian I ended up eating a lot of eggs and dairy as I adjusted, but cut out the soy immediately so I had to seek out more meat for protein. I feel way better than I did a year ago. Much higher energy, I can workout without hitting a wall, and my mood is lifted overall. I did also cut out processed foods at the same time I started eating meat, but I think rebalancing my diet around great sources of protein was the biggest change.

5
9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on July 16, 2012
at 03:33 AM

One tip, I would remember all the vegetables that you eat and all of the wonderful ways to prepare and consume them, because vegetables are most definitely a cornerstone of the paleo diet. You hear a lot of people saying they eat 5 pounds of rib eye steak or something every day and call it paleo, but it isn't. Imagine hunter gatherers in a tribe and what they might eat, and they probably have prime cuts of meat once or twice a year, meanwhile their staples were probably things like readily available vegetables, tubers, and all parts of the animal, which probably means more soups and stews than hunks of meat.

Honestly, vegetables are where the variety in my diet comes from, so from a culinary and dietary perspective, they are essential. If you aren't too worried about carbs, your options are even wider.

The major benefit i got from paleo were from dropping ALL grains and sugars, and dropping all of the bad oils. I would focus on that primarily. Also, eggs, especially good eggs (pasture raised), are delicious and a great source of animal protien and nutrition that are very versatile and accessible. I personally would start there.

Good luck -- i think you are going to see a huge improvement in your overall health!

2979666c364c56e0fe3ba5f62c96826a

on July 16, 2012
at 04:07 AM

May I ask how often you think I should eat meat?

9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

(15833)

on July 16, 2012
at 04:25 AM

I would say around once per day, eventually. If you have not had it for a while there will be an adaptation period, but eventually, your main meal of the day (you might cut back to one or two) will probably be based around meat, or some form of protein.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on July 16, 2012
at 06:12 AM

A soup based on chicken stock, with little bits of meat, and bunch of veggies sounds like a great place to start!

54f75fb54778cfa947990bec1175307a

(665)

on July 17, 2012
at 05:52 AM

I imagine hunter gatherers had access to meat for the most of the year, while fruits and vegetables were available only occasionally if at all (e.g. for inuits) Many people have problems with fresh fruits and vegetables.

4
910404bebbcbd2505810c8cd8db31966

(380)

on July 15, 2012
at 05:00 AM

I also became a vegetarian w/ my family at age 12 and remained either veg or vegan until I was 25 years old. I'm 31 now, and all I can say is, make the effort! It is not easy at first, but stick with it. Try new things. I started out eating just canned tuna and canned chicken because it's what I remembered eating as a child before we went veg. I gradually tried new things, and now I couldn't be happier. It's awesome that you've made the first step! Also, increase your healthy fats, like coconut oil and red palm oil, I think that's almost more important than digging into meat right away.

2
1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on July 16, 2012
at 03:47 AM

I would start with Salmon. Costco has Copper Run Salmon currently. (At least ours does.) I would eat it once or twice a week. Then pick another meat and eggs...

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on July 16, 2012
at 06:21 AM

Healthwise the Omega 3 in Salmon will provide much neeed nutrients and Fish is often a good bridge food.

C0d44d0c62dcf60e8a80ae21411ddeb9

(370)

on July 16, 2012
at 06:11 PM

@ blither: no.

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on July 16, 2012
at 04:33 AM

Don't get me wrong; I loves me some (OK, unhealthy amounts) of salmon... But a recovering veg/vegan onto a salmon diet? Seems kinda scary....

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on July 16, 2012
at 03:59 AM

Really? I would think salmon would be quite a bit more challenging to the gut of somebody who hasn't had animal protein in 24 years. Not questioning the salmon (it's fantastic!), just the "learning cure".

Medium avatar

(4878)

on July 16, 2012
at 04:23 AM

Ah, Salmon, such an easy beast. 10 mins at 425F per "inch". Measure the depth, and you'll get a great meal. Add salt and lemon...Yum...or you could do my famous Salmon Curry: 1 tsp curry, 1TBS sugar, a dash of salt and a dash of ground pepper, cover the top liberally ... cook on Broil for, yes, 10 mins an inch. Eat with a big smile. Partners well with Kale and Kerrygold...

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on July 16, 2012
at 06:25 AM

I get that salmon is über healthy, but wouldn't that be a tad rich for somebody who hasn't had animal proteins or fats for 24 years?

2
A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

on July 16, 2012
at 03:40 AM

Ok, after rereading the initial post, I now get that you haven't had meat of any kind in 24 years. Your body is going to freak out if you go out tonight and decide to have a 24-oz Prime Rib dinner...

Ease back into animal proteins. Beef, lamb, bison, boar and, potentially pork, are going to challenge your digestive system. Commercial pork, since it's mild and essentially neutral-to-bad protein might be ok for a while. Commercial and free-range chicken is going to be your mainstay for quite a while. Turkey will be a potentially pain-inducing treat (it's worth it!)

I'd recommend starting out with "bland" animal proteins: chicken and "blah" fish like tilapia, cod, Ono or the like. Build a tolerance for those, then build the necessary digestive enzymes over time. A rich, delicious ribeye steak may not be within the target region for over a year, but a wild Alaskan salmon filet could be...

I've never been in this position, but I suspect thst the leaner more "challenging" proteins (elk, boar, bison, etc.) are more likely to cause distress as you transition to a more "predatory" diet.

Keep trying good, high quality proteins (grass fed ground beef, Scottish wild rabbit, elk, etc.) until your gut catches up with you.

Good luck, and MOAR BACON!!!! :)

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on July 16, 2012
at 04:23 AM

I have no idea... If it doesn't, then enjoy ALL the proteins! But, given experiences with som friends, I think you're going to have a tough row to hoe getting from chicken to elk...

7eba3d743671649c1e06cacce0ba4e77

(1423)

on July 16, 2012
at 07:25 AM

Luluandmrbear - I'm thinking your body might react because think about it, you have been vegetarian for 24 years! Your gut bacteria is going to be different. Also your stomach acid level might be different. I was only vegetarian and then raw vegan for a short time compared to you and when I had my first meal with meat, holy shit did it give me digestive issues. Well maybe I'm exaggerating a little but I think I didn't have enough stomach acid. Maybe to ease your way into it, you can take hydrochloric acid tablets when you decide to incorporate meat. Try something like chicken soup frst.

2979666c364c56e0fe3ba5f62c96826a

on July 16, 2012
at 04:04 AM

Do you really think my body will react? I had not thought anything different would happen...

C0d44d0c62dcf60e8a80ae21411ddeb9

(370)

on July 16, 2012
at 06:08 PM

this answer is completely wrong. (sorry blither) not one sentence resonates *at all* with my experience, except the last one. "easing into meat" with chicken is a ludicrous concept. chicken *is* meat and not the most delicious either; blech. i say don't bother with it at all.

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on July 16, 2012
at 04:29 AM

You know, at the end of the day... Do whatever you feel comfortable doing. You have a tremendous transition to go through; if bacon, or chicken, or sea slugs gets you there, who am I to get in the way of it? You recognized thst the "paleo" lifestyle might help you out, so HOORAH! I'll (we all) help when we can, laugh when we must, and embrace you as one of our own.

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on July 21, 2012
at 03:55 AM

Eh, to each their own. I have three friends who could tolerate no animal Protiens but chicken or white, mild fish for about six months; other meats made them violently sick.

2
Cbc1f37f2b79b079b0de479d5365a231

on July 16, 2012
at 02:46 AM

Tip #1 : Get some recipes for home-made soup that includes some chicken, lamb or whatever. I think a mild soup or broth would be the easiest way to introduce your palate to meat.

Tip #2 : As somebody has already mentioned, add a little bit of meat to dishes you already eat - salads, sandwiches, curries, etc.

Tip #3 : Take yourself out to a really nice restaurant, the best you can afford. The French are the best (imo) at cooking steak. This adventure should demonstrate how nice meat can taste when cooked with a high level of skill. Something to aspire to when you start experimenting in your own kitchen!

Lastly, take it easy on yourself. If you don't fall in love with the taste of meat immediately, don't force feed yourself, know that it will come with time and experimentation.

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on July 16, 2012
at 03:45 AM

The broth and soup suggestion is fantastic! A slow braise (making soup) tends to destroy the enzymes responsible for making the "meat-adverse" uncomfortable.

2
1d9af5db8833413037be3ac48964714f

on July 15, 2012
at 04:43 AM

There are many people who have a viscerally negative reaction to meat (I've never been one of them). Once you've convinced yourself intellectually that this is a good thing to do, you can use various methods for desensitizing yourself. I've known people who couldn't stand ground meat, but thought a steak was OK. I've also known people who couldn't stand a steak, but managed to think of ground meat as coming from the store, not an animal, and therefore OK. Many self-identified "vegetarians" eat meat sometimes. Everyone is different, so you might want to rank different kinds of meat-containing foods on your own scale of how much the thought of eating them bothers you.

It's possible you might find it OK to start with broth, or eggs, or fish, or shellfish (if you don't already eat some of those). You could try adding a bit of chicken breast to some soup. If preparing meat is hard for you, get it pre-cooked or go to a restaurant.

Any of these options may or may not work for you. Remember that you don't necessarily need to eat meat continuously to gain a lot of the benefits. Good luck!

2979666c364c56e0fe3ba5f62c96826a

on July 15, 2012
at 04:51 AM

Well thank you for not judging me, or thinking me a troll. I eat eggs but could never stand fish or seafood. I do sometimes crave steak. Thank y'all for your kindness.

2
C116f7e54620c6003b67cd4450a298cd

on July 15, 2012
at 04:40 AM

What about fish or chicken? Bacon? Bacon's the gateway meat you know. :) If you can get past the "trauma" there's a whole new world that awaits! Report back, I'd love to hear your progress. Good luck!

C116f7e54620c6003b67cd4450a298cd

on July 16, 2012
at 01:09 AM

I love my grass fed EVERYTHING. in fact, tonight was roasted chicken, and the chicken is from our local rancher. We bought 6 in the late spring right at the height of all the good grass they were eating. Bone broth to follow. best way to consume your chicken if you can get it local - still kicking. :)'

2979666c364c56e0fe3ba5f62c96826a

on July 15, 2012
at 04:46 AM

Honestly, I am thinking red meat. I never ever ate fish, and I don't like chicken, but I did eat a lot of steak, hotdogs and hamburgers as a kid. I also find the idea of kindly raised grass fed cattle appealing.

C45d7e96acd83d3a6f58193dbc140e86

on July 15, 2012
at 02:01 PM

Its at least good that you don't like chicken. Most vegetarians pick chicken as their first meat of choice when leaving the lifestyle. It is the worst!

9beda76f4e91faedc8fa70ecdc01251e

(298)

on July 16, 2012
at 05:39 PM

Technically, chickens don't eat grass. I have raised layers and meat chickens, and they will eat some little leaves, but they really like bugs. Also snakes, frogs, even mice. Think very small velociraptors. They are actually terrifying creatures! :)

2
6714718e2245e5190017d643a7614157

on July 15, 2012
at 04:26 AM

Hi Luluandmrbear,

Here is some info on legumes you might find useful:

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/beans-legumes-carbs/

2979666c364c56e0fe3ba5f62c96826a

on July 15, 2012
at 04:29 AM

Thank you. Still in shock. Still learning. This looks like a great site to peruse.

6714718e2245e5190017d643a7614157

on July 15, 2012
at 05:20 AM

We are all still learning. It takes time to sift through all the bad info to find out what is really the truth. But if you keep it simple and try to eat mainly fresh meat, fresh vegetables, and fresh fruit and avoid processed foods you'll be fine.

6714718e2245e5190017d643a7614157

on July 15, 2012
at 05:19 AM

We are all still learning. It takes time to sift through all the bad info to find out what is really the truth. But if you keep is simple and eat fresh meat, fresh vegetables, and fresh fruit and avoid processed foods you'll be fine.

1
C0d44d0c62dcf60e8a80ae21411ddeb9

(370)

on July 16, 2012
at 05:30 PM

Well, bacon is the quintessential Gateway Meat.

I personally found sausage to be mind-blowingly delicious after 20 years of vegetarianism.

Furthermore, I had no trouble transitioning -- my body did not "rebel". I did not experience any digestive trouble whatsoever. If you have adequate stomach acid - and most people do - you shouldn't have any problem. I was ready and grateful to re-enter the food-chain, right near the top where I belong. I think acceptance of this truth was 90% of the battle for me. I dove right in and haven't looked back.

1
1bd5cfd8c137c93dfdbd159319e5ead5

on July 16, 2012
at 12:41 PM

I was vegetarian for over 25 years and I started with things I thought I could handle. This ended up being, as was suggested, homemade chicken broth based soup. Then I went to fish, which I see you don't care for. I live on the seashore so it seemed a shame NOT to eat fish. :)

I've now managed small bits of beef, which shocks me. I did not have adverse reaction to it. Several years ago I ate what I thought was a vegetarian casserole that made me ill...later I learned it had crumbled beef in it...so I was afraid of beef, but now I find I can tolerate it. I haven't been able to progress to actually eating chicken or pork yet but that's a mental thing.

This is what I want to tell you. I FEEL AMAZING. Absolutely amazing. Even people in my neighborhood who don't really know me well have stopped me to tell me they've noticed I am looking much healthier and happier. I never knew this level of "feel-good" was possible.

Go slow, go for it, and enjoy. :)

1
D669b924a08d9be240146164a2930b93

on July 16, 2012
at 02:01 AM

I became a vegetarian at 12, too - I spent 18 years as a vegetarian/vegan. I felt my health begin to break down but it took a lot of internal struggle before I went back to meat (actually, fish first). I loved animals but I decided I loved myself more. Meat has done AMAZING things for my health, no regrets. But I didn't know the first thing about cooking meat. At first I relied on restaurants but I wanted to buy locally-sourced grass-fed meat so I had to figure out the cooking thing eventually. (I see in your comments you want to eat red meat specifically) My advice would be to look up some recipes for brisket or various roasts - yummy and hard to mess up, whether you use a crock pot or your oven. I STILL don't know much about cooking meat (1.5 years since I gave up vegetarianism) so I rely on briskets and roasts quite a lot. Here's one of my favorite recipes: http://www.jewishfood-list.com/recipes/beef_veal/brisket/brisketcider01.html I make it with the Five Spice Carrots that are linked on the page. So comforting, and totally easy for meat-novices like us! :)

Also I fell in love with LAMB, a meat I never had pre-veg. So maybe trying something completely new would help, if you're having a hard time with the whole idea.

Good luck to you!

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on July 16, 2012
at 03:22 AM

I find lamb can be a bit challenging for recovering Vegans... But Bacon is the true Caller of Truth. :)

1
F1b82cc7e6d90384ad30007dd6c1b9e3

(1187)

on July 16, 2012
at 01:55 AM

was vegetarian for 10 years, don't want to think what kind of blood sugar i would have had by now if I hadn't changed. go slowly, mix up a lot of veggies in with the meat. cut meat into small pieces, it takes a while to get used to the texture again.

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on July 16, 2012
at 03:47 AM

Not just the texture... The longer you go without eating animal protein, the more of the enzymes needed for good digestion disappear.

C0d44d0c62dcf60e8a80ae21411ddeb9

(370)

on July 16, 2012
at 06:13 PM

where are you getting this "information", blitherakt?

0
0a14995ac154eae8242b67115c9cc6c3

(158)

on July 16, 2012
at 05:52 PM

Some good news for you! You don't really have to eat meat to be paleo! or at least not in large quantities.

Before you start crushing T-bones why not re-learn how to be a vegetarian in a paleo context... tackle that first and then consider adding meats later. You are already comfortable eating veg so it just makes sense to start there.

Start by purging your house of non-paleo items. I put everything in big bins and took them to the food bank.

Now go on over to localharvest.org and get signed up for a good vegetable and/or egg CSA

Focus on eating a lots of raw whole foods. Ditch the grains. Swap out your cooking oils for grass fed ghee and coconut oil, and of course olive oil raw is great too.

Eat lots of avocados! Also avocados are on the clean 15.. i always just get huge bags of them at costco.

You should invest in a vitamix if you are used to eating a lot of grains, this will help you eat a massive amount of raw vegetables in a smoothie.

I always start my day with a nice raw smoothie, typically I toss in weeds from my yard (dandelion, lambs quarters, plantain herb) coconut oil, raw eggs, a bit of ginger root, whey protein and some frozen fruit, a banana, coconut oil (3 or 4 tablespoons) and a bunch of chia seeds, water and ice cubes.... A great power breakfast and easy to down. I also use Kale and spinach in place of the weeds sometimes.

Eat lots of eggs, supplement with a very high quality omega-3 (making sure DHA is 1:1 with EPA would be my advice and get a soy free one).

Once you make all of these changes start incorporating some fish into your diet, you can certainly thrive as a paleo -pescatarian. Mark Sisson's wife is a pescatarian (the primal blueprint dude)

If you can get raw milk in your area this is also something that could help you out.

If you do these things and your ready to venture into meat try first getting a bit of grass fed beef with the bones in it and making some bone broth. It's basically just a soup. Look up "Pho" as a preparation idea.

Anyway lots of people go way too meat heavy on paleo... let's give veg some credit here folks. "eat your spinach" popeye!

I hope this gives you a few ideas. You don't have to eat meat to eat paleo. Paleo is just as much about what you are not eating as what you are eating. You can easily eat the correct macro-nutrient ratios while being a lacto-vegetarian. You just need to relearn a healthy vegetarian diet, and if you are eating lots of raw vegetables you should be good to go on your micro nutrients too.

Also worth noting that Denise Minger (who was mentioned) eats very little meat. At least according to her blog.

Good luck.

0
6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on July 16, 2012
at 06:41 AM

Some people are meat averse because they have low stomach acid. You might want to supplement with HCL betaine for a few weeks to help your stomach be better prepared to break down the animal protein.

I was raised 99% vegetarian (except for some medicinal liver and cod liver oil), and didn't have any weird negative reaction when I started eating meat, even though I was convinced it wasn't good for me. Moving to Germany for an exchange program kind of put an end to it. I had some little sausages in a sweet sauce after several cups of Gluhwein and the rest was history. Alcohol...equal parts social lubricant and liquid courage helps with those first few bites, drink up. I think getting completely out of my comfort zone, and trying a meat that I had no way of anticipating what it would taste like, but came highly recommended by locals helped.

If you have any Ethiopian restaurants near you, try the chicken tibs, they have an amazing exotic flavor that is worth sampling at least once in a lifetime regardless of meat eating status. And the injera used to scoop it and mop up the juices, is made from teff flour, and is about as awesome as grain products get, both gluten free and fermented.

Sashimi is also an exotic and tasty place to start if you want to dare yourself into trying some fun flavors. Again, booze helps with first time.

Thai fresh spring rolls with prawns could be a good first bite too.

You can cook rice (if you haven't gone completely grain free) with chicken broth for a tasty side dish to get used to the umami flavor of meat without having to stare down any direct meatiness. You can also use broth to mix up mashed potatoes with a similar result.

Get some friends together and have some fun with this.

0
A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

on July 16, 2012
at 03:20 AM

After talking to numerous vegetarian and vegan friends, the one constant "I miss this food" item has been: bacon.

Maybe try adding delicious bacon to otherwise vegetarian dishes?

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on July 16, 2012
at 03:43 AM

Yeah, re-read the OP's question... While "MOAR BACON" is always valid in my world view, 24 years of soy-as-awesome-protein didn't mesh with the response...

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