6

votes

Heavy Cream (Heavy Whipping Cream)

Commented on November 21, 2014
Created January 21, 2011 at 4:11 PM

I enjoy heavy cream but I cannot find what I consider reliable information about it. (I do not consider anything published by the government or the milk industry as "reliable.")

1) Here in the U.S., in my part of the country, I can only get cream at the grocery store and it is always labeled "Ultra-pasteurized." Why does a fat need pasteurization, ultra or otherwise? Is it because of the (so-called) low amounts of carb and proteins?

2) In the next week or so, after a project at work winds down, I intend to experiment with a menu that is as low-carb as possible for 30 days to observe any results. Has anyone tracked their blood glucose after having taken a large dose -- a cup or two -- of commercial heavy cream?

Any other information, beyond what one finds on a carton or calorie counter, would be much appreciated.

Phocion Timon Jan. 21, 2011

5437163ddf70d4532f196bfb4333753e

(3614)

on April 20, 2012
at 02:16 PM

I think he meant heavy cream is 99.99 % fat from a macronutrient perspective (so not many harmful sugars and proteins that are associated with the negative aspects of dairy). Obviously most foods contain water, but that doesn't seem very relevant. Just my two cents

5c6b0b238bf9e269cb87939b5188b1f9

(20)

on January 18, 2012
at 05:22 PM

processing food is a scourge upon the earth!

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on January 15, 2012
at 06:23 PM

Yes, and there's a bunch of water in there too, and some solids. This is all evident when cream is turned to butter, and again when butter is clarified to ghee. Cream is not 99% fat.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 15, 2012
at 05:20 PM

It's not nice to rub it in, you know! :-)) A long, long time ago that was true here too.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 15, 2012
at 05:19 PM

Must be nice to live near a source. I'm nearly 2 hours away from a store with such products.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on August 14, 2011
at 03:41 PM

That sounds very "it's just regular pasterization but since UHT exists, let's rebrand the term to low heat to creat even more confusion". Can't front on heavy cream thought !

Medium avatar

(5639)

on August 13, 2011
at 08:01 PM

the bottle says "Lowest heat pasteurized, non-homogenized Grade A whole milk cream." Sounds great to me!

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on August 13, 2011
at 04:30 PM

Heavy cream is about 40% fat

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on August 13, 2011
at 10:47 AM

What do you mean by low heat ? Regular pasterizaton (non UHT- Ultra High temperature)?

Medium avatar

(5639)

on August 13, 2011
at 07:12 AM

How much is too much? I'm gonna make a question about it.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on August 13, 2011
at 05:44 AM

yah see I used to eat a lot of cream but even at my most, I might have been eating half pint a day, usually less. Lately though, I haven't even been going through a pint a week.

30fd031cc07a0d7dee7f1cad57f48a0c

(443)

on January 23, 2011
at 03:49 AM

basis for the negative vote?

30fd031cc07a0d7dee7f1cad57f48a0c

(443)

on January 23, 2011
at 03:48 AM

basis for that?

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on January 22, 2011
at 10:04 AM

Dr. Harris' comments are easy to find on blog pages, using the "find" on my computer, or the search function on the blog site.

66e6b190e62fb3bcf42d4c60801c7bf6

(12407)

on January 22, 2011
at 01:32 AM

Scroll all the way down in the comments section. It's one of the last comments.

C2502365891cbcc8af2d1cf1d7b0e9fc

(2437)

on January 22, 2011
at 12:49 AM

Which is the comment made by Dr. Harris?

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on January 21, 2011
at 10:32 PM

Thank you very much for posting this link. I appreciate being able to read Dr. Harris' comment. He always cuts through the opinions and nonsense and gives clear help.

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10 Answers

6
66e6b190e62fb3bcf42d4c60801c7bf6

on January 21, 2011
at 06:04 PM

on a new post on robb wolf's site, there is a very informative pro vs con dairy discussion going on in the comments section with input by chris kesser and kurt harris. very very good stuff on both sides. http://robbwolf.com/2011/01/19/nutritional-relativism/

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on January 21, 2011
at 10:32 PM

Thank you very much for posting this link. I appreciate being able to read Dr. Harris' comment. He always cuts through the opinions and nonsense and gives clear help.

66e6b190e62fb3bcf42d4c60801c7bf6

(12407)

on January 22, 2011
at 01:32 AM

Scroll all the way down in the comments section. It's one of the last comments.

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on January 22, 2011
at 10:04 AM

Dr. Harris' comments are easy to find on blog pages, using the "find" on my computer, or the search function on the blog site.

C2502365891cbcc8af2d1cf1d7b0e9fc

(2437)

on January 22, 2011
at 12:49 AM

Which is the comment made by Dr. Harris?

4
E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on January 21, 2011
at 06:47 PM

Peter looks into a study testing insulin and blood glucose in response to heavy cream. After eating 300 calories of cream, blood glucose drops from 5.16 to 4.47, 4.86, 4.86mmol/L (at 1, 2, 3 hrs). This is doubtless due to insulin increasing from 39.6 to 49.2 before subsiding to 37.2 and 30pmol/L.

By comparison 300 calories of casein move blood glucose from 5.3 to 4.37, 4.88 and 4.83 due to the commensurate massive increases in insulin from 39 to 108.6, 117, 90 (though presumably also accompanied by glucagon, offsetting the effects of the insulin).

2
5c6b0b238bf9e269cb87939b5188b1f9

on January 15, 2012
at 04:49 PM

In the UK we just get cream from a cow. We have cornish cream with a skin and single cream, double cream, extra thick, organic, whipping, whipped, etc...

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 15, 2012
at 05:20 PM

It's not nice to rub it in, you know! :-)) A long, long time ago that was true here too.

5c6b0b238bf9e269cb87939b5188b1f9

(20)

on January 18, 2012
at 05:22 PM

processing food is a scourge upon the earth!

2
30fd031cc07a0d7dee7f1cad57f48a0c

(443)

on January 21, 2011
at 05:08 PM

post coffee and cream I test around 60-70....there is little to no lactose/lactase in heavy cream as it is 99.9 % fat. Most people who dont tolerate dairy well can usually have cream and butter (just heavy cream churned). There is conflicting information depending on which board or author you find...but even robb wolf allows it and kurt (paleonu) thinks its a marvelous neolithic creation.

322a2783dfe4086591f323c6d2c086d6

on November 21, 2014
at 05:59 PM

From ANY perspective whipping cream is not 99.9% fat.
I just read the label and it says 35%. That means that there are proteins and carbs that bacteria feed on and therefore need pasteurization (unfortunately).

30fd031cc07a0d7dee7f1cad57f48a0c

(443)

on January 23, 2011
at 03:49 AM

basis for the negative vote?

30fd031cc07a0d7dee7f1cad57f48a0c

(443)

on January 23, 2011
at 03:48 AM

basis for that?

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on August 13, 2011
at 04:30 PM

Heavy cream is about 40% fat

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on January 15, 2012
at 06:23 PM

Yes, and there's a bunch of water in there too, and some solids. This is all evident when cream is turned to butter, and again when butter is clarified to ghee. Cream is not 99% fat.

5437163ddf70d4532f196bfb4333753e

(3614)

on April 20, 2012
at 02:16 PM

I think he meant heavy cream is 99.99 % fat from a macronutrient perspective (so not many harmful sugars and proteins that are associated with the negative aspects of dairy). Obviously most foods contain water, but that doesn't seem very relevant. Just my two cents

1
Medium avatar

on August 13, 2011
at 05:31 AM

Evan's Farmhouse brand from upstate NY sells WONDERFUL grassfed, non-homogenized, low-heat pasteurized heavy cream from Jersey cows.

I drink almost a pint a day...I'm obsessed. Some fiends have a bag a day coke habit. I have a pint a day cream habit.

Watch out for the commercial crap, it's usually chock full of crageenan.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on August 13, 2011
at 05:44 AM

yah see I used to eat a lot of cream but even at my most, I might have been eating half pint a day, usually less. Lately though, I haven't even been going through a pint a week.

Medium avatar

(5639)

on August 13, 2011
at 07:12 AM

How much is too much? I'm gonna make a question about it.

Medium avatar

(5639)

on August 13, 2011
at 08:01 PM

the bottle says "Lowest heat pasteurized, non-homogenized Grade A whole milk cream." Sounds great to me!

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on August 13, 2011
at 10:47 AM

What do you mean by low heat ? Regular pasterizaton (non UHT- Ultra High temperature)?

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on August 14, 2011
at 03:41 PM

That sounds very "it's just regular pasterization but since UHT exists, let's rebrand the term to low heat to creat even more confusion". Can't front on heavy cream thought !

1
15e684f6f716f88c99f641098a6e06ca

(922)

on January 21, 2011
at 06:19 PM

My local Whole Foods had grass fed, not ultra-pasteurized heavy cream sold in $4 pints by a different brand - not Natural by Nature. But I went to by some 2 days ago and it was off the shelves. In its place I picked up a quart of 365 Everyday (The Whole Foods white label brand) for around $5.40 I think. Not grass-fed but on the bright side it's regular pasteurization - not ultra. So it's thick and just cream - no Carrageenan or gum. The grass-fed one seemed really rich and delicious. But this one is still a step above the regular supermarket options.

I find it odd that the Fairway and Trader Joe's near me don't sell any high quality heavy cream and the nearby farmers markets seem to have everything but dairy. Cream is basically the only reason I make the occasional trip to Whole Foods.

0
D3471976598ade3d1525c4ccfc52de64

on October 26, 2014
at 03:08 AM

The data from this study shows that 200 mL of heavy cream did not increase insulin over baseline levels, though it did increase it slightly over a water control. Cream also did not have any substantial effect on blood glucose levels. In contrast, 75 g of glucose caused much larger (4x) increases in insulin than the cream relative to a water control at 0.5 hr post, and also very large increases in blood glucose relative to water control.

 

I was not allowed to paste the link, so here is article reference:

Wopereis et al. BMC Medical Genomics 2013, 6:44

 

0
A81081d9fcb772c226b5e86b7e417c0d

on January 21, 2011
at 05:49 PM

We found grass fed heavy cream at whole foods that was wonderful. The brand is called Natural by Nature. On their site it says they use "low temp pasteurization", and all their products are certified organic, kosher, and gluten free. It was more expensive than our local grocery stores generic brand but worth it. We have since switched to just using coconut milk, but we highly recommend that brand of heavy cream.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 15, 2012
at 05:19 PM

Must be nice to live near a source. I'm nearly 2 hours away from a store with such products.

0
531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

on January 21, 2011
at 04:56 PM

I've never tested myself for the quantities you mentioned. I've tested myself one and two hours after having about 3 ounces heavy cream with coffee. Baseline readings were about 85-90 mg/dL. Readings post-coffee/cream were about 100 mg/dL.

0
04293f705870e1837b8670d3c1cd5f67

on January 21, 2011
at 04:33 PM

I wish it wasn't ultra-pasteurized, but for obvious reasons, consumers, would want it because they think it would last longer, and the producers are asked to make it by the "buyers" being the grocery store owners; longer shelf life. It must be a slow moving item. (not in my house, it used very fast and sometimes find it regular and not ultra pasteurized.)

I really am interested in your # 2 question.

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