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Fatty heart in pigs - is this a lesson for us?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 21, 2012 at 5:44 PM

I've just been cutting up a pig's heart for dinner. It has a lot of solid fat all round it. Pigs in the UK cannot be fed kitchen scraps but moslty have 'pig food' supplemented with rooting around in pasture (well, the ones I buy, anyway). The following list is the ingredients in pig food:

10-25% Wheat feed, soya, wheat, barley, 10%> molasses, peas, expelled linseed, oat fibre, calcium carbonate, di-calcium phosphate, sodium chloride, natural vitamins, vitamins and minerals.

Pigs are very similar to humans - does this mean that if humans eat this type of diet, and lots do, they will also get fat around the heart?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on October 05, 2012
at 08:29 PM

There is the other problem with parasites in pig meat, which results in lawsuits, which results in pigs being grown in very carefully.

68294383ced9a0eafc16133aa80d1905

(5795)

on October 05, 2012
at 06:30 PM

Good point. I'm not that familiar with the biology but I'd imagine a trained eye would know the difference between a healthy organ and it's fat surroundings versus one that has become diseased by excess adipose tissue. I wouldn't have a clue if I was just looking at what you are.

7e36094a0f7a2fbad24290225405220b

(2064)

on September 22, 2012
at 08:54 AM

Exactly, Mark. We live in a mad, mad (cow disease) world!

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on September 22, 2012
at 12:15 AM

Except wild pigs do eat meat (carrion). But what do you expect from the folks who thought cows were cannibals...

7e36094a0f7a2fbad24290225405220b

(2064)

on September 21, 2012
at 08:53 PM

There was some problem with people feeding pigs on meat which seems to have been considered responsible for foot and mouth disease! The EU make the rules!

7e36094a0f7a2fbad24290225405220b

(2064)

on September 21, 2012
at 08:47 PM

Thanks - that's interesting.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 21, 2012
at 05:49 PM

I think those pigs are better off eating your kitchen scraps. By the way, why are they not allowed? In many countries in Europe they are not allowed. Why? Is it bad for them?

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3 Answers

3
B90b7bac59a3b7d57cd39bf1e6242537

(105)

on September 21, 2012
at 06:21 PM

Any organ that required a lot of calories for general basal metabolic function in any living creature is surrounded by copious amounts of fat...that way the organ has not only what the blood supply is giving for calories but it has a back up supply. In addition to extra protection from trauma. Just a defense mechanism of the body.

7e36094a0f7a2fbad24290225405220b

(2064)

on September 21, 2012
at 08:47 PM

Thanks - that's interesting.

68294383ced9a0eafc16133aa80d1905

(5795)

on October 05, 2012
at 06:30 PM

Good point. I'm not that familiar with the biology but I'd imagine a trained eye would know the difference between a healthy organ and it's fat surroundings versus one that has become diseased by excess adipose tissue. I wouldn't have a clue if I was just looking at what you are.

1
3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on October 05, 2012
at 07:53 PM

I don't know about pigs but we give cattle grain to fatten them up. Shouldn't that tell us something about eating grains???

0
Medium avatar

(10611)

on October 05, 2012
at 08:29 PM

Maybe the big lesson is that we should eat kosher/halal and drop the bacon....?

Seriously if you turned the pig into a free range animal it probably wouldn't be as fatty.

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