3

votes

Thermoregulation? Or, is it cold in here, or just me?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 24, 2011 at 11:26 PM

As I understand it, our Paleo ancestors lived in much chillier times. I simply cannot fathom one of my predecessors sitting, huddled under a Wooly Mammoth pelt by the fire, cold-feeting anybody who tries to share the heat with him.

However, here I am: wearing a thermal undershirt, a long-sleeved overshirt, and a heavy sweater, under a fleece blanket, sipping hot peppermint tea...and it's something like 45 degrees out and raining, but not exactly an ice age out there.

Are you a cold person, or do you burn hot? Has your body's ability to regulate and adjust its core temperature gotten better or worse now that you're Paleo, or has it stayed about the same? What has been your experience with weather extremes and your own personal comfort level?

Medium avatar

(39821)

on December 14, 2011
at 01:55 AM

I restricted carbs recently and waking body temp dropped to 96 degrees...never again.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on December 13, 2011
at 09:43 PM

Had the same experience, though I'm not learn. Last year this time (pre-paleo), I would be feeling the cold hard. These days I don't. I had one brush with wheat a few months, and I immediately lost my cold immunity for a few weeks, but that's over with. I've had people on the train station that were bundled up in puffy jackets stare at me for wearing only a dress shirt and no jacket and not shiver. Part of it is endurance and getting used to the cold. Part of it is getting your thyroid fixed.

Ca2c940a1947e6200883908592956680

(8574)

on December 13, 2011
at 06:07 PM

Note: I am slim, 187lbs, 12.5% body-fat so it has to be due to metabolic rather than insulative reasons. :)

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 13, 2011
at 05:57 PM

It is at least partly a matter of getting used to it. After the hot NV summer, we suddenly dropped about 30 degrees. Elsewhere, it would still have been considered warm but we were all in winter clothes and still shivering. A month later, a day of the same temps had us walking around in t-shirts.

Bf72f771a19f3a3789f7fdf24c86daef

on April 18, 2011
at 06:53 PM

wow, i thought everyone got super hot after eating!

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on March 27, 2011
at 07:33 AM

Sorry to pester you, Andrew, but I was thinking more about your comment, and I'm wondering if the cold feeling you describe is all over or merely topical. The reason I ask is because when I eat certain foods, I feel a chill deep in my gut, all the way up to my throat. It's not acid nor does it burn, but it's super-icy cold and sometimes feels like hunger. I asked about it http://paleohacks.com/questions/28169/cold-throat-when-eating-certain-foods#axzz1HmbDbZIf, actually. Is this like the "cold after eating" sensation you are referring to?

101b3a5c96d313d22262f65bdff20acf

(539)

on March 27, 2011
at 06:58 AM

@Andrew - I have heard that statistic, yes. However, nothing I've tried has much budged my temperature (I run a little higher during PMS). I'm not certain I'd know a symptom of impaired enzyme performance if I had one, but will look into it. Thanks for the tip.

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on March 27, 2011
at 06:56 AM

How curious you'd mention that! I do sometimes find myself chilly after meals (as a matter of fact, when I had posed my question, I had just finished eating my lunch). I had no idea the two were linked, but I definitely do think I still have a long ways to go to recover from years of abuse to my poor digestive system. Thank you for the insight!

D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on March 27, 2011
at 04:34 AM

I did refer to a day as a balmy 45 recently. Thank you Seattle weather.

D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on March 27, 2011
at 04:33 AM

Jennie, it's worth looking into ways of adjusting this. Most human enzymes are adapted for a very narrow temperature range. A one degree change in temperature can hinder enzyme performance by 20%.

D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on March 27, 2011
at 04:30 AM

if you find yourself cold after eating, that is a sign of poor digestion.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on March 26, 2011
at 01:29 PM

In cardiopulmonary bypass surgery we also apply hyperglycemia for protection while on pump. Something with circulatory arrest while clipping brainstem aneurysms

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on March 26, 2011
at 01:22 PM

http://books.google.com/books?id=M5sbCxd5cioC&pg=PA165&lpg=PA165&dq=protective+effects+of+hyperglycemia+in+freezing&source=bl&ots=G4P9-qBsrv&sig=FeIh57fALtSuxMnv2Y43FTitoZI&hl=en&ei=F-iNTd7_OMGdgQfrg-S6DQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=3&ved=0CCQQ6AEwAg#v=onepage&q=protective%20effects%20of%20hyperglycemia%20in%20freezing&f=false

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on March 26, 2011
at 01:17 PM

Well you might not but adaptive is precisely what high blood glucose is......just like hemochromotosis was for the bubonic plague survival

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on March 25, 2011
at 10:59 PM

Excellent points! I was morbidly obese many years ago, but have maintained a healthy weight for several years now. Maybe I am "normal"! :) I know when my Florida family visits me, what typically requires nothing more than a hoodie for me tends to make them bundle up. (It's ALWAYS cold up here on the Pacific Northwest; a "warm" day is like, in the 50s.) Thank you so much for your reply! It's given me a lot to think about, and I'm going to research 'brown fat' further. :D

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on March 25, 2011
at 04:19 PM

Wow, that's a big difference in body temperature! Yeah, I'm the same way. I simply cannot stand being cold. :P

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on March 25, 2011
at 12:05 PM

nd finally, have you ever heard of 'brown fat', how it helps us tolerate cold, and how you can build it up in your body? Google has a lot of good info. It's somewhat easy to increase your comfort at lower temperatures using this mechanism, but you have to endure some initial discomfort. Exposure - winter weather, cold showers (or even just submersing your hands or feet in very cold water), deliberately wearing less clothing in cooler temps, all develop your brown fat and your cold tolerance. Ever notice how much colder not-so-cold temps seem at the beginning of winter, or after warm weather?

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on March 25, 2011
at 12:04 PM

And finally, have you ever heard of 'brown fat', how it helps us tolerate cold, and how you can build it up in your body? It's somewhat easy to increase your comfort at lower temperatures using this mechanism, but you have to endure some initial discomfort. Exposure to cold - cold showers (or even just submersing your hands or feet in very cold water), deliberately wearing less clothing in cooler temps, all develop your brown fat and your cold tolerance.

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on March 25, 2011
at 12:04 PM

Hmm Kaz, I'm not sure! I do know vegetarianism made all my issues (a lot of them ongoing like the chronically freezing thing) very much worse, so that might be part of it for you. Also, I feel normal now, but I have nothing to compare it to but how I was before, which sure wasn't normal. Maybe you're just average these days? Did you used to be very overweight? A lot of my fat friends have pretty severe problems with being overheated, even in normal room temps.

211d4075d68b24cd0aa7ebfa94262bb9

on March 25, 2011
at 05:19 AM

Without insulin, Type 1 diabetes would have killed our "ancestors" in very short order, probably before they even reached reproductive age. I don't see anything adaptive about it at all.

Medium avatar

(5639)

on March 25, 2011
at 04:00 AM

me too! I wish I was an Ice man!

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on March 25, 2011
at 03:10 AM

"High levels of blood glucose prevent cells and tissues from forming ice crystals, Moalem said. In other words, Type 1 diabetes would have prevented many of our ancestors from freezing to death." Wow...that is curious!

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on March 25, 2011
at 03:08 AM

Very interesting! I'm going to research that further. Thank you! :)

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on March 25, 2011
at 03:07 AM

Now that would be a skill I'd like to hone! :)

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on March 25, 2011
at 03:06 AM

I'm glad you are finally able to warm up! I don't eat at a deficit or IF, and I eat a ton of fat. I lost the weight in two chunks, first about a decade ago and the other about three years ago? Would I still be catching up? (I am recovering from vegetarianism...maybe it's related?) Thanks for your input! :)

Medium avatar

(5639)

on March 25, 2011
at 02:24 AM

heck yeah cold showers! makes your body raise it's core temp, and the cold outside doesn't seem so cold!

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on March 25, 2011
at 01:36 AM

Me too. I used to live in Florida, and I LOVED it there, muggy weather and all. :)

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on March 25, 2011
at 01:36 AM

That is interesting! I suspect that I'm short on magnesium, but I have yet to find the quality stuff at my grocery store. Thank you! :)

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on March 25, 2011
at 01:35 AM

I was always cold even when I weighed 100+ pounds more than I do now. I guess I'm just a human icicle! xD

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on March 25, 2011
at 01:34 AM

Fascinating! Thank you for the link. :)

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on March 25, 2011
at 01:01 AM

This is me! When I was obese I was ALWAYS HOT. Now it's the complete opposite. I just figured I had less insulation and my body isn't used to it yet.

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13 Answers

5
Eedf46c82d0356d1d46dda5f9782ef36

(4464)

on March 25, 2011
at 12:29 AM

I don't really like to answer with a link, but a blog I follow had an interesting post and discussion about cold weather exposure.

http://naturallyengineered.com/blog/does-cold-exposure-make-you-stronger-or-weaker/

I hope you'll find it relevant.

As a minor follow-up (which will only make sense if you read the blog and the comments) I now still intermittently take cold showers and through the winter I never wore a coat or jacket (though I did keep one in the car in case of emergency).

Medium avatar

(5639)

on March 25, 2011
at 02:24 AM

heck yeah cold showers! makes your body raise it's core temp, and the cold outside doesn't seem so cold!

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on March 25, 2011
at 01:34 AM

Fascinating! Thank you for the link. :)

4
7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on December 13, 2011
at 06:42 PM

I take my ability to thermoregulate as a sign of health. One way I can tell I'm fighting off a cold is when I can't seem to regulate my body temperature.

Things that I've found correlate with increased ability to tolerate the cold:

  1. Cold exposure (like Aaron mentions), holding out for as long as possible on wearing a coat, not traveling to a warm climate in the middle of winter, etc. I'm also walking a few miles every day, so my body has had time to adjust slowly to the change in temperature.
  2. Increased muscle mass. Strangely, my body fat doesn't seem to matter as much, but when I've got a bit more muscle I can be a furnace.
  3. Lowered stress: things like getting enough sleep and not getting sick.
  4. Leptin levels?: lately I've been doing a leptin reset sort of thing, eating a lot of protein in the morning and not snacking, and my cold tolerance has been awesome. It could just be a coincidence, though.

3
1ccc0b0b7a756cd42466cef8f450d0cb

(1801)

on December 13, 2011
at 05:54 PM

Are you VLC? You may need more carbs. I had this same experience and solved it by adding more carbohydrate to my diet. Sweet potatoes - not just for post-work-out anymore :)

Medium avatar

(39821)

on December 14, 2011
at 01:55 AM

I restricted carbs recently and waking body temp dropped to 96 degrees...never again.

3
26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

on March 25, 2011
at 02:24 AM

For many years I was chronically cold. I suspect my thyroid was not functioning quite right - at one point I had about ever symptom of hypothyroid except the weight gain. On a primal diet, I now burn warmer than many people I know (most of whom are 50 lbs at least heavier than me). My weight has only changed by a few pounds.

If you are losing/have lost a lot of weight, are eating at a moderate to large calorie deficit, or practice fasting - you're probably going to have a problem with feeling colder than you should at cooler temps. With a lack of resources the body redirects heat to vital internal systems like the organs and leaves your skin and limbs out in the cold. I eat a lot, and it keeps me warm. If I feel colder than usual I often realize I haven't eaten much recently, and a meal with fat and protein heats me right back up.

I have a lot more problems with heat in the summer now, but I would much rather get overheated sometimes than live through the long, freezing, miserable winters I used to have. God that sucked. Right now it is 52 degrees in my apartment and I am perfectly comfy in yoga pants and two thinnish tops.

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on March 25, 2011
at 12:05 PM

nd finally, have you ever heard of 'brown fat', how it helps us tolerate cold, and how you can build it up in your body? Google has a lot of good info. It's somewhat easy to increase your comfort at lower temperatures using this mechanism, but you have to endure some initial discomfort. Exposure - winter weather, cold showers (or even just submersing your hands or feet in very cold water), deliberately wearing less clothing in cooler temps, all develop your brown fat and your cold tolerance. Ever notice how much colder not-so-cold temps seem at the beginning of winter, or after warm weather?

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on March 25, 2011
at 10:59 PM

Excellent points! I was morbidly obese many years ago, but have maintained a healthy weight for several years now. Maybe I am "normal"! :) I know when my Florida family visits me, what typically requires nothing more than a hoodie for me tends to make them bundle up. (It's ALWAYS cold up here on the Pacific Northwest; a "warm" day is like, in the 50s.) Thank you so much for your reply! It's given me a lot to think about, and I'm going to research 'brown fat' further. :D

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on March 25, 2011
at 03:06 AM

I'm glad you are finally able to warm up! I don't eat at a deficit or IF, and I eat a ton of fat. I lost the weight in two chunks, first about a decade ago and the other about three years ago? Would I still be catching up? (I am recovering from vegetarianism...maybe it's related?) Thanks for your input! :)

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on March 25, 2011
at 12:04 PM

And finally, have you ever heard of 'brown fat', how it helps us tolerate cold, and how you can build it up in your body? It's somewhat easy to increase your comfort at lower temperatures using this mechanism, but you have to endure some initial discomfort. Exposure to cold - cold showers (or even just submersing your hands or feet in very cold water), deliberately wearing less clothing in cooler temps, all develop your brown fat and your cold tolerance.

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on March 25, 2011
at 12:04 PM

Hmm Kaz, I'm not sure! I do know vegetarianism made all my issues (a lot of them ongoing like the chronically freezing thing) very much worse, so that might be part of it for you. Also, I feel normal now, but I have nothing to compare it to but how I was before, which sure wasn't normal. Maybe you're just average these days? Did you used to be very overweight? A lot of my fat friends have pretty severe problems with being overheated, even in normal room temps.

D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on March 27, 2011
at 04:34 AM

I did refer to a day as a balmy 45 recently. Thank you Seattle weather.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on December 13, 2011
at 09:43 PM

Had the same experience, though I'm not learn. Last year this time (pre-paleo), I would be feeling the cold hard. These days I don't. I had one brush with wheat a few months, and I immediately lost my cold immunity for a few weeks, but that's over with. I've had people on the train station that were bundled up in puffy jackets stare at me for wearing only a dress shirt and no jacket and not shiver. Part of it is endurance and getting used to the cold. Part of it is getting your thyroid fixed.

2
Ca2c940a1947e6200883908592956680

(8574)

on December 13, 2011
at 06:03 PM

I am known for never wearing a jacket and basically live in t-shirts whatever the weather. I own two jackets: one smart one which I carry all the way to my destination and then put on when I ring the doorbell or enter a restaurant only to take it off again. The other I bought from a second-hand retro shop and I think it was made in the 1980's and looks like something out of Breakin'. I wear it for effect, and for the opportune moment when I need to pop and lock.

Simply I hardly ever feel the cold, it is about 2 degrees in London at the moment and I only wear a jacket so children don't point at me and cry. People go "ooouuuuuggggghhhh" when I walk past and though I used to think they were going "ooooooooohhhh" I now realise it is definitely an "ooouuuuuggggghhhh" and not anything to be smug about.

I don't know what it is, but I seem to generate a lot of heat. I would love someone to follow me around with a body-temperature meter just so I could see if I am in fact warmer than everyone else. I am a lousy bed-partner; at best think 1994's "The specialist" Stone and Stallone sweat scene, at worst you will find me sleeping on the floor just so I can get away from the fiery blazing hell furnace that is a woman's sleeping body.

But I have one weakness. If I do on the rare occasion get cold, such as not eating all day and being stuck in the wind, I literally shutdown. I go very quiet and hardly move. It seems that if I lose my core-temperature it is deadly and no amount of toprock, uprock or 6-step are going to get me going again.

It is then food food food and nothing but food until I flame-on again.

Ca2c940a1947e6200883908592956680

(8574)

on December 13, 2011
at 06:07 PM

Note: I am slim, 187lbs, 12.5% body-fat so it has to be due to metabolic rather than insulative reasons. :)

2
Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on December 13, 2011
at 05:42 PM

Just saw this article today about how you burn "brown fat" to deal with the cold. Maybe you've used yours all up!!

http://www.newswise.com/articles/view/583927/?sc=dwhr&xy=5049556

I also read about the Shackleton adventure and how when it was "only" like minus 20 in Antarctica they were all tearing off their shirts and feeling overheated. I guess it's a matter of getting used to it? Maybe because we keep going in and out of the cold we can't adjust properly?

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 13, 2011
at 05:57 PM

It is at least partly a matter of getting used to it. After the hot NV summer, we suddenly dropped about 30 degrees. Elsewhere, it would still have been considered warm but we were all in winter clothes and still shivering. A month later, a day of the same temps had us walking around in t-shirts.

2
B9637ddb9a9a5c6a7306e3c804fcd21d

(3217)

on December 13, 2011
at 04:56 PM

I've always been a bit of a human battery; my hands and body in general were always warm, even in relatively cold weather; my mum, who is hypothyroid and always cold, uses me as a supersized hot water bottle whenever she's with me on the sofa. However, it's not like I never got cold; I'd still wear a scarf and jacket in the winter. However, when I went Paleo - specifically when I increased my fat intake - I became a lot more resistant to cold. I find I get too hot wearing layers, so I dress much lighter now.

That said, I find my cold tolerance decreases when I fast intermittently. For me, its the only unpleasant side effect of fasting.

I do think that paleolithic peoples used the hides and furs of animals they killed for insulation; I don't think they had babor gear and goreTex in those days...:-)

2
101b3a5c96d313d22262f65bdff20acf

(539)

on March 25, 2011
at 06:09 AM

Ugh, I've always been cold, usually feel cold, my body temp is 4-5 degrees lower than everyone else's and has been since I was a kid. On the occasions I ran a real fever my mom had to explain to medical staff that 98 degrees was actually rather alarming.

It's great when I'm in the Australian outback or in Death Valley, not so great when I moved from California to Massachusetts. My husband says I am a lizard and frankly, I do envy their "heat lamp and hot rock" lifestyle.

Paleo has not changed this for me.

D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on March 27, 2011
at 04:33 AM

Jennie, it's worth looking into ways of adjusting this. Most human enzymes are adapted for a very narrow temperature range. A one degree change in temperature can hinder enzyme performance by 20%.

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on March 25, 2011
at 04:19 PM

Wow, that's a big difference in body temperature! Yeah, I'm the same way. I simply cannot stand being cold. :P

101b3a5c96d313d22262f65bdff20acf

(539)

on March 27, 2011
at 06:58 AM

@Andrew - I have heard that statistic, yes. However, nothing I've tried has much budged my temperature (I run a little higher during PMS). I'm not certain I'd know a symptom of impaired enzyme performance if I had one, but will look into it. Thanks for the tip.

2
Medium avatar

on March 25, 2011
at 02:28 AM

Check this stuff out:

Tibetan monks can raise their body temps by meditation alone: http://media.abovetopsecret.com/media/911/The_Sushumna_-_Tibetan_Monks_Melting_Ice_Meditating_in_Himilayas/

The ICE MAN! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=madoDvtKEes

Medium avatar

(5639)

on March 25, 2011
at 04:00 AM

me too! I wish I was an Ice man!

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on March 25, 2011
at 03:07 AM

Now that would be a skill I'd like to hone! :)

2
Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on March 25, 2011
at 01:04 AM

Just throwing this out there, but on days that I don't take a significant amount of magnesium I am colder. It is essential for thermoregulation and tons of other things which might take more priority than increasing temperature, and HGs got more of it than most people do. I'm talking like 600mg of the stuff.

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on March 25, 2011
at 01:36 AM

That is interesting! I suspect that I'm short on magnesium, but I have yet to find the quality stuff at my grocery store. Thank you! :)

2
50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on March 25, 2011
at 12:52 AM

I find myself getting a lot colder these days. I attribute it to the loss of Body Fat through Paleo. So yes, Paleo indirectly caused me to run colder.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on March 25, 2011
at 01:01 AM

This is me! When I was obese I was ALWAYS HOT. Now it's the complete opposite. I just figured I had less insulation and my body isn't used to it yet.

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on March 25, 2011
at 01:35 AM

I was always cold even when I weighed 100+ pounds more than I do now. I guess I'm just a human icicle! xD

1
Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on March 25, 2011
at 02:17 AM

High blood glucose actually is believed to be protective for falling temps from ice age.

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on March 25, 2011
at 03:10 AM

"High levels of blood glucose prevent cells and tissues from forming ice crystals, Moalem said. In other words, Type 1 diabetes would have prevented many of our ancestors from freezing to death." Wow...that is curious!

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on March 26, 2011
at 01:17 PM

Well you might not but adaptive is precisely what high blood glucose is......just like hemochromotosis was for the bubonic plague survival

211d4075d68b24cd0aa7ebfa94262bb9

on March 25, 2011
at 05:19 AM

Without insulin, Type 1 diabetes would have killed our "ancestors" in very short order, probably before they even reached reproductive age. I don't see anything adaptive about it at all.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on March 26, 2011
at 01:22 PM

http://books.google.com/books?id=M5sbCxd5cioC&pg=PA165&lpg=PA165&dq=protective+effects+of+hyperglycemia+in+freezing&source=bl&ots=G4P9-qBsrv&sig=FeIh57fALtSuxMnv2Y43FTitoZI&hl=en&ei=F-iNTd7_OMGdgQfrg-S6DQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=3&ved=0CCQQ6AEwAg#v=onepage&q=protective%20effects%20of%20hyperglycemia%20in%20freezing&f=false

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on March 25, 2011
at 03:08 AM

Very interesting! I'm going to research that further. Thank you! :)

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on March 26, 2011
at 01:29 PM

In cardiopulmonary bypass surgery we also apply hyperglycemia for protection while on pump. Something with circulatory arrest while clipping brainstem aneurysms

1
F0b70b26adf36e5987134716af10d53a

on March 25, 2011
at 01:12 AM

Well I've been Paleo for over a year. The drop in bodyfat has sent me under whatever coverings I can find. In the gym, I'm the one hogging the heater! In the winter I'm cold! I layer to regulate my body temp. I like the sun and the 100f temps!

74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on March 25, 2011
at 01:36 AM

Me too. I used to live in Florida, and I LOVED it there, muggy weather and all. :)

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