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Tendonitis on knee and crossfit for 5 months

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 05, 2012 at 10:35 PM

I've been diagnosed with tendonitis for the past 5 months on my right knee. It hasn't gotten worse or better. Is there anything you suggest that can help it? I still do crossfit but have to limit some of the exercises.

Thanks

Medium avatar

(19479)

on March 08, 2012
at 09:52 PM

I'm glad that you've had success working with a physiotherapist (I believe this is the equivalent of a physical therapist in the US) and other such professionals in the past. However, this does not mean that the original poster should not ask for advice. By his own admission, the original poster said that he has tried to continue Crossfitting the entire time, and it is quite prudent that he "rest and ice", which is what I actually said that he should do. If that doesn't work, then yes, get some help. I don't recall recommending that he eat more liver, eat less carbs, or anything either.

Medium avatar

(19479)

on March 08, 2012
at 09:43 PM

I agree with your disagreement. By "take some solid time off" I meant "take some solid time off crossfit".

F524eaa9d58e5cd2d2368ff7bfffda9c

(480)

on March 08, 2012
at 04:29 PM

I had to disagree with this. You can heal and correct biomechanical issues while still staying active. What he probably has to stop is Cross Fit.

F524eaa9d58e5cd2d2368ff7bfffda9c

(480)

on March 08, 2012
at 04:27 PM

A GP is very different from a physiotherapist. A Doctor is going to tell you to rest and take advil or prescription NSAID. A physio or chiro is going to screen, test and assess and provide manual therapy ontop of corrective exercises to address the underlying issue of your pain. Yes, professionals have helped me tremendously. FED - He has had tendonitis for 5 months... there is obviously something wrong with how he moves and/or stabilizes his body. Noone on this can tell him what it is which is wrong. It isn't a matter of taking supplements or eating less carbohydrates or more liver.

Medium avatar

(19479)

on March 07, 2012
at 09:50 PM

I'd agree if he said, "Help! I dislocated my elbow and need advice!"

Medium avatar

(19479)

on March 07, 2012
at 09:48 PM

I agree big time with the "look upstream and downstream" advice. The knee in and of itself is rarely the source of knee problems. Poor ankle mobility and lower leg/foot strength as well as poor hip mobility and core stabilization (pelvis/low back) are the biggest contributors to chronic knee problems. Also, reevaluating your movement/lifting technique would be a good next step after you get the acute symptoms under control.

Fd627132a760e414f2afbf378c8afd9b

(260)

on March 07, 2012
at 06:43 AM

Has a medical professional actually helped you with tendonitis? I had tendonitis in my shoulder for years and doctors couldn't do anything for me.

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7 Answers

2
D2db41500a9385fafe0f50e178717e80

(193)

on March 06, 2012
at 12:12 AM

I had a similar issue. As much as it sucks, time off is the way.

Add ice (RICE method), add massage, subtract movements that irritate it. Often times, tendonitis can be a symptom of something wrong either upstream or downstream of the effected area. So, have a good sports massage therapist do some work on your hips, lower back, quads, hammy, IT, ankles, calves...you get the idea.

Mobility WOD is a good starting place, but it's primarily for stuff you can do yourself. Therefore, you can't get in the nooks and crannies, let alone get the leverage, by yourself.

Medium avatar

(19479)

on March 07, 2012
at 09:48 PM

I agree big time with the "look upstream and downstream" advice. The knee in and of itself is rarely the source of knee problems. Poor ankle mobility and lower leg/foot strength as well as poor hip mobility and core stabilization (pelvis/low back) are the biggest contributors to chronic knee problems. Also, reevaluating your movement/lifting technique would be a good next step after you get the acute symptoms under control.

2
Medium avatar

(19479)

on March 05, 2012
at 11:25 PM

You can help ease some of the inflammation by applying an ice pack to your knee at night (no need to "freeze" your knee, just a few minutes "on" and a few "off" to your comfort level), but it will never really heal until you take some solid time off.

I had lingering bicep tendon issues in my left shoulder for several months and it wasn't until I got very sick and was literally out of commission for an entire week that it cleared up. I kept telling myself that a few push ups, pull-ups, etc. here and there wasn't hurting it, but the fact that it wasn't getting better means that I was hurting it.

Medium avatar

(19479)

on March 08, 2012
at 09:43 PM

I agree with your disagreement. By "take some solid time off" I meant "take some solid time off crossfit".

F524eaa9d58e5cd2d2368ff7bfffda9c

(480)

on March 08, 2012
at 04:29 PM

I had to disagree with this. You can heal and correct biomechanical issues while still staying active. What he probably has to stop is Cross Fit.

1
79fc447191de75e7c178951594a43f13

(448)

on March 07, 2012
at 08:12 AM

You should go to a chiropactor and/or a physical therapist for their advice. For example, I had some knee pain and went to a chiropactor who did something to loosen up my leg muscles which helped my knee pain disappear. Sometimes what is needed for a pain to go away is for some part of your body to loosen up--ie mobility. MDs don't really study this at all.

You might also want to get the book "The Sports Medicine Patient Advisor" by Pierre Rouzier. It has various rehab exercises in it. For example, it shows six different exercises for Patellar Tendonitis.

1
324bf94d3d6f9322d6e4dba4becfaab1

on March 06, 2012
at 05:58 PM

You're not going to find a consensus on this issue so you're just going to have to make up your own mind, but in my opinion icing an injury is counterproductive. Icing can feel like it helps because it dulls the pain, and reduction pain typically indicates healing, but in this case that is not true. Inflammation is part of the healing process, not part of the injury, so getting rid of it doesn't make any sense.

Numerous studies involving corticosteroids, which are used to reduce inflammation, have been done on rats. One study gave corticosteroids for a rotator cuff injury for a week, and it took three more weeks for the rats to catch up to the control group. Another study gave rats corticosteroid injections for two weeks, and those rats had significant degeneration compared to the control group.

http://www.jbjs.org/article.aspx?articleid=29189
http://ajs.sagepub.com/content/27/1/2.abstract

Like I said, your not going to find a consensus online (not that consensus are all that meaningful anyway), but in my own research and personal experience it seems that heat and light exercise (whatever weight/movements you can do without pain) is the way to heal tendon injuries.

0
E1c41fc9d29cec2c3066e000c9562d92

on March 07, 2012
at 02:01 PM

I would suggest the fat-soluble vitamins, as they are essential for connective tissue repair. So this would be Vitamin D3 (5,000iu), Vitamin A (Preformed as retinyl palmitate, 6,000 - 10,000iu), Vitamin K2 (as MK-4, menatetranone, 500mcg), and Vitamin E (as mixed tocopherols and tocotrienol, 50-100mg). You can either supplement these things directly, or get some sunlight, eat some liver, and eat some grass-fed butter.

A note on K2. Japanese have been prescribing this stuff for osteoporosis at dosages of 45mg, without toxic effects, so don't worry about wildly varying dosages.

Also make sure you have a decent balance between calcium and magnesium in your diet, I would say no more than 2:1, calcium to magnesium. You could also look into some of the sulphur supplements like MSM, which gets mixed results.

I think your best bet is to make sure you are getting your fat-soluble, some omega-3's to help reduce the pain, and then taking a break from Crossfit to let it heal. Crossfit isn't exactly easy going and you are only increasing the time your in pain by not letting it heal.

0
Fd627132a760e414f2afbf378c8afd9b

(260)

on March 07, 2012
at 06:41 AM

If you're not taking fish oil, I'd recommend you start, and gradually ramp up the dosage. When I take about 1-2 grams daily all my joint issues disappear.

The other supplement that is phenomenal for joints is Cissus.

I'd also limit any movement that bothers it until it gets better. Give it time to heal. The fish oil will reduce inflammation, which should help your knees and cissus actually eliminated the tendonitis I had in my shoulder.

-1
F524eaa9d58e5cd2d2368ff7bfffda9c

(480)

on March 06, 2012
at 01:39 PM

You need to see a physiotherapist and not ask the advice of people on a Paleo forum.. that is if you want to get better.

Fd627132a760e414f2afbf378c8afd9b

(260)

on March 07, 2012
at 06:43 AM

Has a medical professional actually helped you with tendonitis? I had tendonitis in my shoulder for years and doctors couldn't do anything for me.

Medium avatar

(19479)

on March 07, 2012
at 09:50 PM

I'd agree if he said, "Help! I dislocated my elbow and need advice!"

Medium avatar

(19479)

on March 08, 2012
at 09:52 PM

I'm glad that you've had success working with a physiotherapist (I believe this is the equivalent of a physical therapist in the US) and other such professionals in the past. However, this does not mean that the original poster should not ask for advice. By his own admission, the original poster said that he has tried to continue Crossfitting the entire time, and it is quite prudent that he "rest and ice", which is what I actually said that he should do. If that doesn't work, then yes, get some help. I don't recall recommending that he eat more liver, eat less carbs, or anything either.

F524eaa9d58e5cd2d2368ff7bfffda9c

(480)

on March 08, 2012
at 04:27 PM

A GP is very different from a physiotherapist. A Doctor is going to tell you to rest and take advil or prescription NSAID. A physio or chiro is going to screen, test and assess and provide manual therapy ontop of corrective exercises to address the underlying issue of your pain. Yes, professionals have helped me tremendously. FED - He has had tendonitis for 5 months... there is obviously something wrong with how he moves and/or stabilizes his body. Noone on this can tell him what it is which is wrong. It isn't a matter of taking supplements or eating less carbohydrates or more liver.

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