3

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Physiology of bags under ones eyes

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created June 25, 2012 at 3:16 PM

Good morning everyone,

Does anyone know the physiology behind getting bags under ones eyes from lack of sleep or poor sleep quality? Why does it happen and what is it a signal of (other than sleep deprivation) - does it signal anything about a nutrient deficiency?

thanks

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on May 04, 2013
at 05:49 PM

Are you the author of the article this text came from? (http://scienceline.org/2008/10/ask-peretsman-eye-under-bags/) If not, it should be cited or it constitutes plagiarism.

Cbf014e1272e1c092e774c70e78b7890

(300)

on June 25, 2012
at 07:34 PM

No eye cream :P. Have a fear of lotions in general

Cbf014e1272e1c092e774c70e78b7890

(300)

on June 25, 2012
at 07:33 PM

I like the depth. But I'm 22 years old so I dont think gravity has had enough time to really "work" on me yet :). I have a low salt, active diet, I do not consume alcohol, and I get these bags under my eyes sporadically even when I sleep 7+ hours a night... It's an odd case b/c it is not a regular thing for me, so i cannot even point and say "it happens ever time I get X hrs of sleep"... odd..

Cbf014e1272e1c092e774c70e78b7890

(300)

on June 25, 2012
at 07:31 PM

I don't eat any meat with nitrate really. I don't eat a lot of red meat in general, although I am trying to increase that intake. And bacon in particular I do not eat b/c its not kosher *tear tear*. I hear its delicious...

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6 Answers

1
B0043cfab0d6ef41d402ea4f197ec1f2

(50)

on June 25, 2012
at 03:50 PM

do you eat a lot of meat with nitrate? i noticed when i ate at my fav breakfast spot, and was eating a lot of the "natural" bacon i had huge bags! maybe it was all the salt tho. either way, i stop and they stoped showing up. just my own personal observation, it was really getting at me for a while.

Cbf014e1272e1c092e774c70e78b7890

(300)

on June 25, 2012
at 07:31 PM

I don't eat any meat with nitrate really. I don't eat a lot of red meat in general, although I am trying to increase that intake. And bacon in particular I do not eat b/c its not kosher *tear tear*. I hear its delicious...

0
C0237fd9e277fcef496d538beda1f35b

(287)

on June 25, 2012
at 05:14 PM

Allergies are also a major cause. Or do you use an eye cream? Have to ask...more men are using it. Sometimes over use of that will do it, too.

Cbf014e1272e1c092e774c70e78b7890

(300)

on June 25, 2012
at 07:34 PM

No eye cream :P. Have a fear of lotions in general

0
D5fb5742c7dff785714e49d2fd7e4572

on June 25, 2012
at 05:03 PM

It could also be lack of moisture. The skin under your eyes is thinner than skin around other parts of your face or body. Try a really nice night creamy under-eye cream on a regular basis and you may see some difference!

0
B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on June 25, 2012
at 03:42 PM

Ray Peat talks about this in an article about progesterone :

Hypoxia in turn produces edema (as can be observed in the cornea when it is deprived of oxygen, as by a contact lens) and hypoglycemia (e.g., diminished ATP acts like insulin), because glycolysis must increase greatly for even a small deficiency of oxygen. Elevated blood lactic acid is one sign of tissue hypoxia. Edema, hypoglycemia, and lactic academia can also be produced by other “respiratory” defects, including hypothyroidism, in which the tissue does not use enough oxygen. In hypoxia, the skin will be bluer (in thin places, such as around the eyes), than when low oxygen consumption is the main problem. Low thyroid is one cause of excess estrogen, and when high estrogen is combined with low thyroid, the skin looks relatively bloodless.

As usual he considers hypothyroidism to be the problem. I haven't been able to get rid of the dark circles yet, though they're way better than on raw veganism (when I didn't have dark circles but had massive dark circles).

I'm not sure about this but it looks like histamine plays a big role in all this since a lot of people mention having success with vitamin C overdoses, high calcium, high vitamin D, ... I've tried all those together and still didn't have success.

Anything that shuts down my thyroid (fasting, not sleeping, cardio) tends to increase the darkness of the circles.

0
44f0901d5b0e85d8b00315c892d00f8a

on June 25, 2012
at 03:25 PM

Common Causes

While people often associate under-eye bags with lack of sleep, one main cause may actually be much more fundamental: gravity. The gravitational pull weighs down on all Earthly objects, including your skin. The longer you???re exposed to gravity (i.e., the older you get) the more your facial tissues sink toward the floor.

But prolonged exposure to gravity is not the only bag-forming effect that the aging process bestows on us. As we get older, the tissues around our peepers change.

The upper and lower eyelids are composed of skin, muscle and fat. With age, the muscles weaken and can???t hold up the skin as tightly. Skin also changes because the collagen inside it degrades. Collagen is a protein that gives structure to our cells. In skin, it provides elasticity. With less collagen, the skin starts to wrinkle and sag.

Beneath the skin and muscle, the main culprit for under-eye puffiness is fat. ???As you get older, your fat, like everything else, starts drooping.???

Remedies

Undereye bags can often be treated with lifestyle changes and home treatments. Sitting upright with a cold, wet washcloth under your eyes for a few minutes can help reduce puffiness. Give the home remedy more pizazz by using some cucumber slices or used and chilled tea bags instead. Some basic changes in your routine--reducing your salt intake, sleeping with your head elevated, cutting back on alcohol and coffee, staying hydrated with water and getting at least seven to eight hours of sleep every night--may also reduce bags under the eyes.

Cbf014e1272e1c092e774c70e78b7890

(300)

on June 25, 2012
at 07:33 PM

I like the depth. But I'm 22 years old so I dont think gravity has had enough time to really "work" on me yet :). I have a low salt, active diet, I do not consume alcohol, and I get these bags under my eyes sporadically even when I sleep 7+ hours a night... It's an odd case b/c it is not a regular thing for me, so i cannot even point and say "it happens ever time I get X hrs of sleep"... odd..

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on May 04, 2013
at 05:49 PM

Are you the author of the article this text came from? (http://scienceline.org/2008/10/ask-peretsman-eye-under-bags/) If not, it should be cited or it constitutes plagiarism.

-1
99c4d2a5ff6686132c6f403a3b8e9a80

on May 04, 2013
at 07:03 AM

Dark circles under eye are burning issue amongst most people; they are trying every possible approach to get rid of them. Many of them try cucumber slices and icing on the eyes; this will help in easing the bagginess and puffiness of the eyes. But still some of them might be left over with dark skin under the eyes. Lack of collagen production underneath the skin is responsible for causing skin problems under eyes. Other causes can be lack of sleep, allergies, eczema, stress, sun exposure, etc. Vitamin deficiency in the body can also lead to appearance of dark circles, bags, fine lines around the eyes.

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