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If fish is so healthful then why do so many have an aversion to it?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 03, 2012 at 11:22 AM

Is it because it is so often not perfectly fresh?

Is it habitually cooked improperly?

Is it because it tends not to be processed?

5437163ddf70d4532f196bfb4333753e

(3614)

on December 03, 2012
at 08:15 PM

Harsh.....yet true

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on December 03, 2012
at 03:50 PM

"unhealthy foods like chocolate" FAIL!

4517f03b8a94fa57ed57ab60ab694b7d

on December 03, 2012
at 02:12 PM

I just realized how daft this question indeed is. Oh well - so I ran out of coffee this morning. And I'm an idiot.

4517f03b8a94fa57ed57ab60ab694b7d

on December 03, 2012
at 01:58 PM

I wonder how frequent it happens among voracious fish eaters to get a bone stuck in the throat or some other fish-bone-related trauma.

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on December 03, 2012
at 12:27 PM

Most people think white French bread and cake is delicious. That doesn't make it healthy. My husband won't eat sweet potatoes or spinach. Doesn't make it unhealthy... Just makes him picky.

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9 Answers

8
1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

on December 03, 2012
at 12:23 PM

Because people are whiney, spoiled, grew up on wonderbread and balogna sandwiches, and have never developed their taste buds past toddlerhood.

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on December 03, 2012
at 12:27 PM

Most people think white French bread and cake is delicious. That doesn't make it healthy. My husband won't eat sweet potatoes or spinach. Doesn't make it unhealthy... Just makes him picky.

5437163ddf70d4532f196bfb4333753e

(3614)

on December 03, 2012
at 08:15 PM

Harsh.....yet true

3
Ff1dbd6cecad1e69a8234fb2c2c5c5ed

(1409)

on December 03, 2012
at 12:36 PM

It seems that people can be trained to eat certain things from childhood. In France fish and offal are just as common as muscle meat, served in school cafeterias and restaurants and hardly anybody has an aversion to those things. Now if your parents didn't like fish... Toddlers typically don't have these aversions. The one thing they usually refuse are bitter greens.

2
B2379df17e386c4455996b186731db5e

(209)

on December 03, 2012
at 07:07 PM

My family are extremely fat-phobic. So in the past (and sometimes now) when we had/have fish, it's grilled white fillet, and it always leaves me hungry afterwards. That's why I internally groan when my mum announces that we're having fish, because I don't know what it'll be. I loved salmon and sardines, however. So I think satiety is a big factor.

2
59fa7cd87fb9d669adf21e5cf3e7ada5

on December 03, 2012
at 01:02 PM

I grew up eating fresh fish all the time because my family fished a lot, but I have never liked fish unless it is fried. I think this is because fish tends to be very lean, frying it adds some fat to make it more satisfying. I don't care what species the fish is, if it's fried I like it, if it's not fried I'm "meh."

The right sauce can also make it tasty but it has to be a sauce with substantial amount of olive oil.

To me eating a plain grilled fillet is like eating chicken breast, nutritious but not very delicious.

1
61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10490)

on December 04, 2012
at 12:43 AM

I think just because it is a strong flavor/smell. A lot of SAD eaters don't like real flavorful food that isn't sweet or salty. Most popular legume and grain products or preparations aren't nearly so pungent as fish, or liver, another popular Paleo food that a lot of people have an aversion to eating.

My mother hates fish for that reason. She also hates stuff that is too "chickeny" like most soup or any cheeses but mild Cheddar and American, and the fake mozzarella crap that's on cheap chain pizzas. Some people just aren't used to strong flavors and they don't develop a taste for them.

1
46c9fbd45b82453f6a2dfe614a853314

on December 03, 2012
at 08:26 PM

I think that it is a smell thing (at least for me). I love fresh fish (especially grouper) but if fish has that 'fishy odor', I know it is not fresh and it is not appealing to me. I think that may be a defense mechanism to protect our tummies from spoiled/rotten fish!

1
0b73cdbd0cb68aeeda14dafeebb2f828

on December 03, 2012
at 11:39 AM

Mainly because most people wear clothes, avoid sunshine exposure and have lower vitamin D3 levels than humans evolved to produce naturally.

It's time we all understood that paleo people lived outdoors wearing little if any clothing and were able to make the anti-inflammatory Vitamin D3 from dawn to dusk and the anti-inflammatory melatonin from dusk to dawn.

Traditionally living populations in East Africa have a mean serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration of 115 nmol/l~46ng/ml. These levels naturally INCREASED with age and when pregnant.

I used to be allergic to fish but since keeping my 25(OH)D (vitamin D3) level at or above 50ng/ml 125nmol/l I can eat fish every day without any problems. I don't have hay fever any more either.

Start supplementing now with 1000iu/daily Vitamin D3 for each 25lbs weight and in 3~5 months get 25(OH)D tested, Vitamin D Council do a 4 pack reasonably priced by CityAssays Birmingham UK NHS path lab are as cheap. Then raise vitamin D intake 1000iu for each 10ng/ml below target or reduce by same amount if higher than 60ng/ml. It may take a while before you notice the effect on allergy but by next Spring you should notice a difference if you make sure you take effective amounts of D3 daily overwinter.

0
0b7c3e7fd96005f0b2dfd781e512fc2e

(1237)

on December 03, 2012
at 12:22 PM

People have aversions to lots of healthy things. If it were a case of biological reductionism, then why would people crave unhealthy foods like chocolate? Our response to food is not a simple correlation with whether it contains/lacks essential nutrients/vitamins/minerals (though this is also an important and likely the primary factor). There are all sorts of emotional, environmental and cultural factors which affect the psychology of how we experience eating. For example, people will describe the smell of caramel as "sweet" even though it's actually a bitter/burnt smell, just because they have built up a psychological association with the TASTE of caramel which is sweet. Similarly, we have all sorts of neurological associations with fish and that will affect how we experience it.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on December 03, 2012
at 03:50 PM

"unhealthy foods like chocolate" FAIL!

0
Ef9f83cb4e1826261a44c173f733789e

on December 03, 2012
at 11:39 AM

While growing up my mom had an aversion to fish, but she would always make crappy frozen fish sticks and the like. Eventually she moved on to fresh fish and loves it.

I think it does have to do with how easy fish becomes "fishy." Plus, depending on how the fish is prepared, I sometime avoid it because of the bones.

Another thing for me is, a basic white fish fillet, as good as it may be, just doesn't "hit the spot" the way beef and chicken does. It might be because it's so low in fat and bland on its own.

4517f03b8a94fa57ed57ab60ab694b7d

on December 03, 2012
at 01:58 PM

I wonder how frequent it happens among voracious fish eaters to get a bone stuck in the throat or some other fish-bone-related trauma.

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