2

votes

Athletic Performance VS. Health

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 03, 2012 at 2:28 AM

how many of yall are interested in overall health than how you look, perform, etc. Personally me, im 18, weigh 187, and have been playing sports since my early teens and sports performance, and looks are my top priorities. what about yall?

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on September 03, 2012
at 02:04 PM

OFten but not always you can test the validity of a statement by examining its extremes. I believe that this is the case where you can. Do you think it is possible to be healthy but out of shape and unattractive? Of course not. Do you think it is possible to be extremely athletic and good looking but simultaneously be unhealthy? OF course not.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on September 03, 2012
at 02:01 PM

"Time will rob you of your looks" That is absolute nonsense. Time will rob you of your looks if you let it. You can definitely grow old fast or you grow old slowly. If you pay attention to your health from a young age and take it seriously, I see no reason why you cannot look and perform decades younger than your chronological age (that is, be biologically younger). I know plenty of older individuals like this. There is a 65 year old man at the gym I go to who looked 45. He weight lifts every morning and says he stays on his feet throughout the morning and into the late afternoon.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on September 03, 2012
at 01:56 PM

Building fitness and building character often go hand in hand.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on September 03, 2012
at 01:56 PM

About the craving self esteem b.s. That is true for some, and certainly not all. You can get a good appearance through proper diet and exercise-which makes you healthy- but looking good is a happy consequence of that. You can also build character that lasts along the way by challenging yourself everyday, competing with others, and learning from your successes and failures. I would say that a lot of my athleticism and broad shoulder girth came from the combination of swimming and rowing competitively, and especially in the latter is where I built a large part of the character I am today.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on September 03, 2012
at 01:52 PM

I can't believe this got up voted. So filled with logical errors it is. "Health is first for me." Do you think it is possible to be out of shape and unattractive but also be healthy? Of course it is not- health is bundled up with (and is a product of) athleticism and good looks.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on September 03, 2012
at 01:31 PM

body composition + vo2 max + complexion = health level might be the ultimate barometer, IMHO.

531b053b68e92ac509fc1544f88dc103

(1205)

on September 03, 2012
at 01:04 PM

Dude, live it up. Rock some awesome abs and get lots of chicks at the beach. That's all that matter when you're 18.

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8 Answers

1
1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

on September 03, 2012
at 01:40 PM

I think a healthy body composition combined with good skin tone (glow/complexion) is likely the ultimate barometer of health. These are indicative of proper hormonal balance and the absence of diabetes. IF you achieved your body composition through exercise and diet (not steroids or borderline supplements), then you likely have a healthy heart as well. Thus, "sports performance" and "health" are not mutually exclusive, but rather complimentary.

Also, I don think that it is possible (or natural) to be truly good looking and simultaneously unhealthy. We're naturally attractive to healthy/fit partners as a survival mechanism and product of natural selection. That is, a natural view of what is good looking by necessity includes what is healthy. So, good looks and health are a necessary compliments and it makes no evolutionary (or experiential) sense that you could possibly have one without the other

1
Fd7b128cf714044a86d8bd822c7a8992

(4292)

on September 03, 2012
at 01:07 PM

I'd say health is #1 - but at this point, anything that's good for my performance IS good for my health, and vice versa. So I've never actually had to choose; I can go for both at the same time.

1
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 03, 2012
at 11:28 AM

31, former college athlete. Once Family and the Job become your top priorities -- the rest becomes impossible. so I focus on healthy living to manage the stress. Trying to get to 8% bf just adds to the stress. Looks are not as important, but I think so performance is a indicator of health. I don't run a 16 minute 5k anymore, but I am currently pushing to break 20.

1
Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on September 03, 2012
at 07:01 AM

Health first for me. Health is foundational, without out it, everything else is irrelevant, and with it, everything else is easier.

I dont mind that ive lost some weight, I am not without some superficiality, but obsessing over looks is a pointless waste of time.

What you are really craving, by obsessing about looks is positive attention, and positive self esteem. The kind of positive attention that will psychologically satisfy you fully, will not be based primarily on looks, it will be based on care/love, or well earned admiration. The kind of self esteem that will fully satisfy you, will be one that is resiliant, and thus not based on a single skill, or a set of physical attributes (thus it will be self-generated ie come from within)

Time will rob you of your looks. Then it will tear away your health, before it eventually takes away your life. That may seem like a long way off (heck it is for me too), but theres no point in setting yourself up for a fall by pining everything on something conditional, and essentially temporary.

At least by maintaining your health for the years while you have it, as long as possible, youll get a good quality of life.

And enjoying your youthful appearance and ease of appearance while you have it, rather than obsess on perfection. Youll look back one day and wonder why you were so underconfident and critical, rather than taking full advantage of what you actually have. Basically everyone does this as they get older. Be more confident/easy, be less obsessed IMO.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on September 03, 2012
at 01:52 PM

I can't believe this got up voted. So filled with logical errors it is. "Health is first for me." Do you think it is possible to be out of shape and unattractive but also be healthy? Of course it is not- health is bundled up with (and is a product of) athleticism and good looks.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on September 03, 2012
at 01:56 PM

Building fitness and building character often go hand in hand.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on September 03, 2012
at 01:56 PM

About the craving self esteem b.s. That is true for some, and certainly not all. You can get a good appearance through proper diet and exercise-which makes you healthy- but looking good is a happy consequence of that. You can also build character that lasts along the way by challenging yourself everyday, competing with others, and learning from your successes and failures. I would say that a lot of my athleticism and broad shoulder girth came from the combination of swimming and rowing competitively, and especially in the latter is where I built a large part of the character I am today.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on September 03, 2012
at 02:04 PM

OFten but not always you can test the validity of a statement by examining its extremes. I believe that this is the case where you can. Do you think it is possible to be healthy but out of shape and unattractive? Of course not. Do you think it is possible to be extremely athletic and good looking but simultaneously be unhealthy? OF course not.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on September 03, 2012
at 02:01 PM

"Time will rob you of your looks" That is absolute nonsense. Time will rob you of your looks if you let it. You can definitely grow old fast or you grow old slowly. If you pay attention to your health from a young age and take it seriously, I see no reason why you cannot look and perform decades younger than your chronological age (that is, be biologically younger). I know plenty of older individuals like this. There is a 65 year old man at the gym I go to who looked 45. He weight lifts every morning and says he stays on his feet throughout the morning and into the late afternoon.

0
1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

on September 03, 2012
at 01:27 PM

Body composition is the best indicator of health. A healthy body composition (barring the use of steroids and borderline supplements) is indicative of proper hormonal balance and the absence of diabetes. If you achieved that through exercise, then you likely have a healthy heart as well. Thus, "sports performance/looks" and "health" are not mutually exclusive, but, rather likely complimentary.

Also, I do not think it is possible to be truly good looking (if we'll be so superficial at the moment and negate any personality factors) and simultaneously unhealthy. We're naturally attracted to healthy/fit partners as a survival mechanism handed to us through evolution. So, good looks and health are a necessary compliments and I do not believe you can have one without the other.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on September 03, 2012
at 01:31 PM

body composition + vo2 max + complexion = health level might be the ultimate barometer, IMHO.

0
98266ae0c87836d4bb714b6d31cacbf9

on September 03, 2012
at 03:35 AM

19 here, i started of my fitness journey last year and yes the most important thing for me was looks. It has been a year since then and now my top priority is health, since i've noticed if my health is optimum this has a positive effect on my mood thus my overall life is better. I used to waste a lot of time fantasizing about the ideal body, looking back that was pointless.

0
06ca9c524c28bc3fba95d4d90f8f43c6

on September 03, 2012
at 03:26 AM

Well, I'm currently 30 and I think I'm having a mid-life crisis because looks have become very important to me again. Of course a large portion of that I can attribute to losing a large amount of weight I acquired while letting the stresses of life take its toll. I will say this, it's a lot harder to shake it off when you're 30 vs. 18!!!

Matthew@physiquerescue.com

0
531b053b68e92ac509fc1544f88dc103

(1205)

on September 03, 2012
at 02:53 AM

I'm 32 and unrealistically dreaming of being Hollister's oldest beach model. :-p If not, then at least I'm still healthier than other guys my age.

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