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injured hamstring....what to do?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 27, 2012 at 4:23 PM

I tore my right hamstring muscles two days ago, went to the doc who patted me on the back and said, 'soft tissue damage' and 'just wait for it to heal'. Now I know he was in a hurry and having a 60 year old woman with such damage, I felt discounted. I am an active person who loves construction work, up and down ladders, etc. and want to fix it and do whatever is needed as it heals. The only thing he offered was a painkiller which I refused.

Can anyone make suggestions as to what I can do to speed or assist healing? The damage is at the top of the muscle, just under the buttock. I feel a knot of muscle there which is sore to the touch.

Thanks everyone!

3dc940ac9be21e45cf83207814c8cd46

(544)

on April 27, 2013
at 03:17 PM

Much appreciated Jake! I am on the mend. I have had to concentrate on walking with a normal gait b/c my leg felt shorter for a while.

A5127d60bca783084f191f38ffa357a6

(687)

on November 29, 2012
at 12:44 AM

Yea that's the inflammation process , ice ice . After that get started on some eccentric hamstring exercises. I have experienced this with both hamstrings if you have any questions feel free to email me at ktfram@netzero.net

3dc940ac9be21e45cf83207814c8cd46

(544)

on November 28, 2012
at 03:30 AM

Much appreciated!

3dc940ac9be21e45cf83207814c8cd46

(544)

on November 28, 2012
at 03:29 AM

thanks so much for the advice CD and foreveryoung!. Much appreciated!

3dc940ac9be21e45cf83207814c8cd46

(544)

on November 28, 2012
at 03:27 AM

Yes, it hurts to sit and there is a lump at the top of my thigh at the back.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on November 27, 2012
at 04:48 PM

I agree with CD, but would just add that most often the underlying issue with hamstring strains is a muscular imbalance (overdeveloped quads) and/or that the tie in between your ham and glute is/was not properly loosened up. I would also recommend some foam rolling (and/or a deep tissue massage if you're willing). Once you can use it comfortably again, start lower body stretching routine after you've been properly warmed up.

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5 Answers

1
B36bbab16837fe6d60eb2b5a49a561ed

(314)

on April 26, 2013
at 06:27 PM

Consider treating your injury with METH instead of RICE. METH stand for Movement, Elevation, Traction, and Heat

I agree that ice is useful in reducing potential excess scar tissue formation, however I feel that the use of ice needs to be limited to about 72 hours post injury. The use of heat and mobility exercises should be employed after the initial use of ice in order to increase blood flow to the injury site. This will allow for better transportation of nutrients to the site of the sprain and improved recovery potential. Excessive use of ice will decrease blood flow, limiting inflammation, however it will also limit blood flow, increasing the amount of time it will take for full healing to occur.

Here are some resources:

http://www.quaystreetphysio.com.au/fact_sheet/heat_or_ice_which_to_do_fact_sheet.php

http://www.tnation.com/free_online_article/most_recent/radical_methods_of_injury_rehabilitation

http://theelitetrainer.com/wp/the-new-injury-rehabilitation-paradigm-rice-is-not-nice-do-meth-instead/

http://ezinearticles.com/?Novel-Methods-of-Injury-Rehabilitation:-How-to-Heal-Fast-Starting-From-the-Bottom-Up&id=6765006

3dc940ac9be21e45cf83207814c8cd46

(544)

on April 27, 2013
at 03:17 PM

Much appreciated Jake! I am on the mend. I have had to concentrate on walking with a normal gait b/c my leg felt shorter for a while.

1
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on November 27, 2012
at 04:40 PM

Rest, Rest, REST.

Soft Tissue Damage is not typically referred to as "tearing". Typically one would say "Sprain" or "Strain"

The good news is that it is probably fairly minor and will heal in a week or less. The RICE protocol will help. Rest, Ice, and Compression especially.

Use the time to relax and reduce stress, taking a de-load week can be beneficial in many way. After a couple of days it should be healed sufficiently that you can walk and climb ladders.

Also, I should add two things:

1) Let your pain guide you. If you are still in a lot of pain, rest some more.

2) You should discuss your feelings with your doctor. Never feel like you are obligated -- He/She works for YOU. You should control your time with them. If you are not happy, find a new doctor.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on November 27, 2012
at 04:48 PM

I agree with CD, but would just add that most often the underlying issue with hamstring strains is a muscular imbalance (overdeveloped quads) and/or that the tie in between your ham and glute is/was not properly loosened up. I would also recommend some foam rolling (and/or a deep tissue massage if you're willing). Once you can use it comfortably again, start lower body stretching routine after you've been properly warmed up.

3dc940ac9be21e45cf83207814c8cd46

(544)

on November 28, 2012
at 03:29 AM

thanks so much for the advice CD and foreveryoung!. Much appreciated!

0
A5127d60bca783084f191f38ffa357a6

on November 27, 2012
at 06:55 PM

Trust me, I have chronic tendonitis. RICE until the pain is gone! If it isn't gone by a couple weeks (it should get better everyday). Then have some soft tissue work like ART, graston, or foam roll. Does it make it hard to sit, is it up that far on the hamstring?

3dc940ac9be21e45cf83207814c8cd46

(544)

on November 28, 2012
at 03:27 AM

Yes, it hurts to sit and there is a lump at the top of my thigh at the back.

A5127d60bca783084f191f38ffa357a6

(687)

on November 29, 2012
at 12:44 AM

Yea that's the inflammation process , ice ice . After that get started on some eccentric hamstring exercises. I have experienced this with both hamstrings if you have any questions feel free to email me at ktfram@netzero.net

0
06ca9c524c28bc3fba95d4d90f8f43c6

on November 27, 2012
at 04:38 PM

Here is how I treated a recent groin injury: (Disclaimer: not a physician, but a former athlete with some experience with injuries)

  • Initially, R(est), I(ce), C(ompression).
  • Compression combined with ice over the full course of recovery and ice after every lower body workout.
  • I resumed light activity and let my body tell me when I was pushing it a little too far.
  • Modified a few exercises (ie: switching to front squat from back squat) and I was able to continue training.
  • Building on the last point, the injury was an opportunity to train in new ways or bring up lagging areas of fitness.

Good luck with recovery, a hamstring injury is no joke.

Matt
PhysiqueRescue.com

3dc940ac9be21e45cf83207814c8cd46

(544)

on November 28, 2012
at 03:30 AM

Much appreciated!

-2
1f6a2d334a6d36179a144fd9c66b9680

on April 26, 2013
at 04:21 PM

Hi

Sorry to hear about your pain , Hamstring strain is very common in sports world.

Our orthopedic team treat hamstring strain in a different way using "Stem cell therapy" to replace the damaged part with a new one.

Our doctors are orthopedic surgeons besides having stem cell therapy experience.

Please contact us at

http://www.stem.md/

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