2

votes

Why does the GAPS diet and other gut healing protocols eliminate starch?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 05, 2012 at 7:59 PM

What is wrong with starch?

I dont know how i feel about getting all my carbs from bananas and fruit...

88905cfc5bb098ad3830671a1af373a8

(803)

on May 12, 2012
at 08:31 PM

sorry but you can't refer to proteins that are similar to gluten as "a type of gluten" or "a form of gluten." they may be almost as bad, or even worse, but they're not gluten. cross-contamination is obviously a problem, but i'd like to see statistics supporting the idea that "almost all" oats are contaminated.

345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on May 07, 2012
at 01:45 PM

most times if rice isnt labeled with 'gluten free' it has gluten, perhaps its more of a cross contamination issue or another form of gluten, i don't know, but it may contain gluten unless says gluten free.....I only speak from my issues

E12ead3bf63c94b5b619b03722ef554f

on May 07, 2012
at 07:51 AM

Almost all oats (with the exception of those that are labelled gluten-free) are contaminated with gluten because they are processed in the facilities/ with the same equipment used for wheat. PLUS, oats contain a type of gluten called avenin that can also trigger symptoms in sensitive people. Rice does contain a form of gluten called oryzenin. Although it is usually better tolerated that the type of gluten found in wheat, barley, rye and oats, it can still be problematic for some people (just like corn and oats). See: http://www.csaceliacs.info/treatment_of_celiac_disease.jsp

35b2cb4d450e5288895c255dfdfff35d

(5828)

on May 07, 2012
at 03:52 AM

One of the focuses of the Weston A Price Foundation (WAPF) is proper preparation of foods. You might enjoy their site: http://www.westonaprice.org/.

88905cfc5bb098ad3830671a1af373a8

(803)

on May 07, 2012
at 02:47 AM

Oats have no gluten.

8496289baf18c2d3e210740614dc9082

(1867)

on May 06, 2012
at 06:38 PM

No rice has gluten. Gluten is specific to wheat, rye, barley, oats, and a handful of ancient grains few folks eat these days. Rice, corn, potatoes, and other starches have agglutinating proteins, but these are *not* gluten and do not cause the same immune response.

345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on May 06, 2012
at 05:09 PM

some rice has gluten!

05055dcbf12c81f1cce777ec365870af

(1791)

on May 06, 2012
at 10:07 AM

Bananas are starch FYI

41dfb1a4fecb38d24075ff52f13ccb28

on May 06, 2012
at 12:20 AM

Not yet, but that's next on my list of things to try out. I've been fermenting vegetables, which is awesome. I also found out that I can digest beans without a problem if I sprout them first. I'm starting to wonder how much of my (or anyone's) digestion issues are from bad prep methods, so traditional sourdough is very interesting to me... especially after I saw an article saying that some celiacs can eat traditional sourdough. So, uh, yeah... not yet, but I've been looking into it... a lot. :)

3327924660b1e2f8f8fc4ca27fedf2b2

(2919)

on May 06, 2012
at 12:04 AM

Rice has no gluten.

3327924660b1e2f8f8fc4ca27fedf2b2

(2919)

on May 06, 2012
at 12:03 AM

Ever made sourdough?

8496289baf18c2d3e210740614dc9082

(1867)

on May 05, 2012
at 11:58 PM

Rice contains phytic acid and other plant toxins, but no gluten. It contains proteins that work analogously to gluten, but they are different proteins and digestible by humans. The problem with gluten is that it is indigestible, and consequently engenders an immune response like any other non-self protein incapable of digestion.

41dfb1a4fecb38d24075ff52f13ccb28

on May 05, 2012
at 10:46 PM

I don't know SCD well enough to be sure of their thoughts on fructose, but I do know all the fruits I eat normally are on their legal list (apples, oranges, bananas). I know there are a number of people around here who are anti-fructose, but I also know there are a number of us around here that have found we do better when we add fructose. See my answer to this question.. also you might be interested in this thread: http://paleohacks.com/questions/110259/fructose-digestion#axzz1u1ybfAr4

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on May 05, 2012
at 10:32 PM

Interesting. So does that mean specific carbohydrate diet has no problems with fructose? I assumed most around here thought fructose not ideal for digestion/metabolism.

41dfb1a4fecb38d24075ff52f13ccb28

on May 05, 2012
at 10:20 PM

"Followers of the Specific Carbohydrate Diet are advised to eat only ripe bananas to ensure that most of the starch has converted to simple sugars, an unripe banana contains 20 to 25% more starch than a ripened one." http://glutenfreescdandveggie.blogspot.com/2012/04/baked-bananas-in-fresh-orange-juice-gf.html (IIRC, it's the same with GAPS)

7d3a7b532811b6cfa2de09acdf52d145

(610)

on May 05, 2012
at 09:54 PM

That rice gives you some trouble is because it still contains some gluten: http://youtu.be/cv5RwxYW8yA?t=1m10s

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7 Answers

7
Cccb899526fb5908f64176e0a74ed2d9

(2801)

on May 05, 2012
at 08:01 PM

Starch can be used by any potential nasties (i.e. bacteria) that might be hanging out in your intestines for fuel . In contrast, most mono and di-saccharides (such as those found in fruit) are metabolized before any invading bacterial colonies can feast.

4
8d454fc50d6d58643d6f8b0d1e7ea8ea

on May 05, 2012
at 08:56 PM

This is from the info page on the SCD (precursor to GAPS):

"The allowed carbohydrates are monosaccharides and have a single molecule structure that allow them to be easily absorbed by the intestine wall. Complex carbohydrates which are disaccharides (double molecules) and polysaccharides (chain molecules) are not allowed. Complex carbohydrates that are not easily digested feed harmful bacteria in our intestines causing them to overgrow producing by products and inflaming the intestine wall. The diet works by starving out these bacteria and restoring the balance of bacteria in our gut." (from http://www.breakingtheviciouscycle.info/beginners_guide/beginners.htm)

3
41dfb1a4fecb38d24075ff52f13ccb28

on May 05, 2012
at 08:11 PM

Speaking from personal experience, starches can be far harder to digest than fruit.

I can digest any fruit without a problem. White potatoes and white rice make me feel like I've eaten a bag of concrete, and give me acid reflux to boot. Sweet potatoes are somewhat better, but I still don't want to eat them in any quantity. Starches also make me bloat like mad.. I will never have a bigger gut in my life than when I am eating starches. (For the record, no amount of probiotics, bone broth, upping my carbs with other things before adding starches, or any of the other recommendations did a thing to make this any better.)

Apples, pears, bananas, kiwis, oranges... you name it, my body has no issues with these at all. No concrete. No bloating. No swelling. Actually, I think they have improved my digestion by quite a significant margin.

I have been toying with the idea of sprouting some rice and seeing if that's any better, but I'm not holding my breath at this point.

3327924660b1e2f8f8fc4ca27fedf2b2

(2919)

on May 06, 2012
at 12:03 AM

Ever made sourdough?

41dfb1a4fecb38d24075ff52f13ccb28

on May 06, 2012
at 12:20 AM

Not yet, but that's next on my list of things to try out. I've been fermenting vegetables, which is awesome. I also found out that I can digest beans without a problem if I sprout them first. I'm starting to wonder how much of my (or anyone's) digestion issues are from bad prep methods, so traditional sourdough is very interesting to me... especially after I saw an article saying that some celiacs can eat traditional sourdough. So, uh, yeah... not yet, but I've been looking into it... a lot. :)

35b2cb4d450e5288895c255dfdfff35d

(5828)

on May 07, 2012
at 03:52 AM

One of the focuses of the Weston A Price Foundation (WAPF) is proper preparation of foods. You might enjoy their site: http://www.westonaprice.org/.

2
Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on May 05, 2012
at 09:45 PM

Wait a minute. Isn't starch just a chain of glucose? Fruits contains starch. And I thought that bananas are among the favored fruits because they are relatively higher in starch and lower in fructose than other fruits. Following shows about 25% of carbohydrate in banana is starch:

http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/2260?fg=&man=&lfacet=&count=&max=&sort=&qlookup=&offset=&format=Full&new=

41dfb1a4fecb38d24075ff52f13ccb28

on May 05, 2012
at 10:46 PM

I don't know SCD well enough to be sure of their thoughts on fructose, but I do know all the fruits I eat normally are on their legal list (apples, oranges, bananas). I know there are a number of people around here who are anti-fructose, but I also know there are a number of us around here that have found we do better when we add fructose. See my answer to this question.. also you might be interested in this thread: http://paleohacks.com/questions/110259/fructose-digestion#axzz1u1ybfAr4

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on May 05, 2012
at 10:32 PM

Interesting. So does that mean specific carbohydrate diet has no problems with fructose? I assumed most around here thought fructose not ideal for digestion/metabolism.

41dfb1a4fecb38d24075ff52f13ccb28

on May 05, 2012
at 10:20 PM

"Followers of the Specific Carbohydrate Diet are advised to eat only ripe bananas to ensure that most of the starch has converted to simple sugars, an unripe banana contains 20 to 25% more starch than a ripened one." http://glutenfreescdandveggie.blogspot.com/2012/04/baked-bananas-in-fresh-orange-juice-gf.html (IIRC, it's the same with GAPS)

1
E12ead3bf63c94b5b619b03722ef554f

on May 07, 2012
at 07:49 AM

Starches are made of long chains of glucose and therefore take longer to digest compared to monosaccharides (fructose and glucose). The GAPS diet eliminates starches because if you have digestive issues, you are likely not digesting starches well and these starches are then more likely to stay in your gut and be fermented in your intestines, contribute to SIBO or other digestive disorders.

Monosaccharides, like these found in fruits and squashes, are usually better tolerated because their carbohydrates are digested more quickly and you are more likely to absorb them before they reach the regions of your gut where high amounts of bacteria live and can start fermenting these sugars. However, some people with SIBO (small intestinal bacterial overgrowth) can't even tolerate fruits and squashes. I agree that even fruits, non-starchy vegetables and squashes contain small amounts of starches, but not as much as grains or tubers, which is fine for SOME people. Individualization is key with the GAPS diet.

The GAPS diet is not a high-fructose diet by any means. Some people don't eat any fruits and honey. Other can. But in any case, the GAPS diet is a relatively low-carb diet compared to the standard American diet.

1
E3a6128b63b3198453a6dbc0e7380877

on May 07, 2012
at 03:44 AM

SCD allows fructose, because it is a monosaccharide. However, many people have problems digesting even fructose and it cannot be part of THEIR diet, at least until they have healed sufficiently. Fructose feeds Candida, so if Candida is part of your problem you should avoid it.

1
345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on May 05, 2012
at 09:05 PM

I'm right now on GAP intro protocol, stage 6.

Fruit doesn't come right away but they do start you right off with carrots, squash and pumkin, a good alternative starch.

I get omitting starches like rice (that bothers my system), but for me, potatoes arent a problem.

Potatoes and rices are omitted for the purpose of starving yeast over growths, which removal of these items helps to starve.

I was recently traveling and had a problem with the food they gave me, grilled chicken soaking in oils which I couldnt look at let alone eat, I opted for a potatoe 2 nights in a row and I'm perfectly fine and felt no ill effects (but they were expected).

I'm back on protocol again but was happily surprized to see that it didnt have any outward or obvious effect on me, but back to legal foods only!!

3327924660b1e2f8f8fc4ca27fedf2b2

(2919)

on May 06, 2012
at 12:04 AM

Rice has no gluten.

345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on May 06, 2012
at 05:09 PM

some rice has gluten!

7d3a7b532811b6cfa2de09acdf52d145

(610)

on May 05, 2012
at 09:54 PM

That rice gives you some trouble is because it still contains some gluten: http://youtu.be/cv5RwxYW8yA?t=1m10s

8496289baf18c2d3e210740614dc9082

(1867)

on May 05, 2012
at 11:58 PM

Rice contains phytic acid and other plant toxins, but no gluten. It contains proteins that work analogously to gluten, but they are different proteins and digestible by humans. The problem with gluten is that it is indigestible, and consequently engenders an immune response like any other non-self protein incapable of digestion.

345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on May 07, 2012
at 01:45 PM

most times if rice isnt labeled with 'gluten free' it has gluten, perhaps its more of a cross contamination issue or another form of gluten, i don't know, but it may contain gluten unless says gluten free.....I only speak from my issues

E12ead3bf63c94b5b619b03722ef554f

on May 07, 2012
at 07:51 AM

Almost all oats (with the exception of those that are labelled gluten-free) are contaminated with gluten because they are processed in the facilities/ with the same equipment used for wheat. PLUS, oats contain a type of gluten called avenin that can also trigger symptoms in sensitive people. Rice does contain a form of gluten called oryzenin. Although it is usually better tolerated that the type of gluten found in wheat, barley, rye and oats, it can still be problematic for some people (just like corn and oats). See: http://www.csaceliacs.info/treatment_of_celiac_disease.jsp

8496289baf18c2d3e210740614dc9082

(1867)

on May 06, 2012
at 06:38 PM

No rice has gluten. Gluten is specific to wheat, rye, barley, oats, and a handful of ancient grains few folks eat these days. Rice, corn, potatoes, and other starches have agglutinating proteins, but these are *not* gluten and do not cause the same immune response.

88905cfc5bb098ad3830671a1af373a8

(803)

on May 07, 2012
at 02:47 AM

Oats have no gluten.

88905cfc5bb098ad3830671a1af373a8

(803)

on May 12, 2012
at 08:31 PM

sorry but you can't refer to proteins that are similar to gluten as "a type of gluten" or "a form of gluten." they may be almost as bad, or even worse, but they're not gluten. cross-contamination is obviously a problem, but i'd like to see statistics supporting the idea that "almost all" oats are contaminated.

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