6

votes

Questions about gut bacteria (and maybe other).

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created November 21, 2012 at 7:50 AM

Yesterday I met yet another wonderful traditional doctor. Contrary to the previous one, he actually knew something. And I would like to emphasize "SOMEthing".

So we had a two hour lovely discussion about my symptoms, my test results, my diet and so on. He finally put me on antibiotics (it only took five years for somebody to figure it out) and confirmed my diagnosis (just wanted to point out that I diagnosed myself, I had the testing done on my own will, and the test results confirmed my diagnosis).

It was an interesting experience, although it is becoming more and more painful for me to talk to people about my dietary habits. I am tired of defending bone broth, liver and my choice of vegetables.

Anyway, this is what he said after I told him what I eat every day:"You are not eating grains? You are not eating dairy? You are not eating nuts? You are not eating fruit? Only meat and vegetables?

Do you know that most of your gut bacteria that eats those foods is going to die out? So you are harboring bad bacteria that will take up that niche? And next time you will try to eat grains, you will have a hard time digesting them because you will not have the bacteria that will help you to break it down?"

I kind of thought it was enzymes, but he claims that it is all related to gut bacteria.

My question: do people develop intolerances after quitting certain foods because their gut bacteria dies out? What do you think about it?

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on November 21, 2012
at 08:05 PM

You are probably insulin sensitive.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on November 21, 2012
at 06:20 PM

Thanks for the article. An interesting read!!!

1ccc0b0b7a756cd42466cef8f450d0cb

(1801)

on November 21, 2012
at 05:00 PM

This is an interesting question. When the paleo diet was all about zero starch, I eliminated it and had trouble digesting it for a while after reintroducing.

2e777bbcd49262eb31a24f821abec6bc

(1974)

on November 21, 2012
at 02:41 PM

Thanks for the info... That is really interesting to hear. Both me and my mom have had appendectomies and we both are constantly anemic. My doctor has put us on really high doses of iron that do not help at all. If we take a probiotic... Problem solved. Seems it could be related.

153c4e4a22734ded15bf4eb35b448e85

(762)

on November 21, 2012
at 02:19 PM

I have read so, yes, and also often times those whose appendix has been removed have children who in turn then also have problems with the flora, since the gut bacteria transfers itself from the mother. But I still wouldn't stress about it much, especially if there are no symptoms present, and maybe being on probiotics for life would help.

2e777bbcd49262eb31a24f821abec6bc

(1974)

on November 21, 2012
at 01:57 PM

Hmm do those of us without an appendix need to be more careful with gut flora then?

153c4e4a22734ded15bf4eb35b448e85

(762)

on November 21, 2012
at 12:17 PM

I think that people develop intolerances because their thyroid starts getting underactive on very restrictive diets. But there are studies which show that you will have less beneficial bacteria when eating low carb (leaving out starch etc.), but I think that the good bacteria comes back fairly quickly (it did for me) if you start eating a more varied diet again. The gut flora situation is much established in child hood, and your appendix stores your original gut flora.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on November 21, 2012
at 08:44 AM

There are pros and cons to having antibiotics on SIBO. From everything I have read so far, I will stay away from probiotics. But thanks for caring.

47edf681280750c3712a3a56f2eae33b

on November 21, 2012
at 08:30 AM

Not going to try and answer but I think your beneficial bacteria won't die out just the colony may be down to just a few peeps. If you are on antibiotics you will need some pro-biotics. I'm sure there is a way to get them and still adhere to you nutritional strategy. Just gonna have to hack some more.

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4 Answers

3
E565e11cf32b38ab1f45086c1e0205f7

(613)

on November 21, 2012
at 03:36 PM

Interesting, I thought the theory was exactly the opposite with diets like SCD, GAPS, and anti-Candida - eliminating certain foods to starve pathogenic organisms, creating a less competitive environment for beneficial ones.

2
7a6529ea25b655132fe58d793f95547a

(2030)

on November 21, 2012
at 07:50 PM

I tend to agree with mM up above, if you look at someone who is metabolically healthy they can generally eat whatever they want and it's no big deal even if it's not eaten for a while. So I would say that the body can regulate gut flora in a healthy individual and only when our vitality/biochemistry is compromised do we seem to run into trouble(IMO).

I find it interesting that some folks can fix digestive disorders by eating say a HED diet or a Ray Peat inspired diet. I'm not saying that they're ideal in the long term just interesting to note.

I do seem to get funny symptoms when I go low in carbs and add back in different roots and tubers after a few weeks but eventually my body will normalize.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on November 21, 2012
at 08:05 PM

You are probably insulin sensitive.

1
E253f8ac1d139bf4d0bfb44debd1db21

on November 23, 2012
at 12:48 PM

Imagine a sterile gut. No bacteria whatsoever. That would be pretty awesome, I think. Unless someone can think of why it wouldn't be

0
366c23d69eadce094a2b22299c58a424

(2988)

on November 21, 2012
at 01:10 PM

I think your gut bacteria changes as you make drastic changes to your diet, and I also think that is why many people feel crappy for a time when they switch to paleo or switch to a low carb diet (the "low carb" flu). Whether or not the bacteria that eventually die off are replaced with "bad" bacteria is another issue, as is whether or not your body could later readjust to digest a wider variety of foods.

BTW, there is a fascinating article on bacteria and how much we depend on bacteria for health in the Oct 22 issue of the New Yorker -- "Germs Are Us". Includes discussion of antibiotics & probiotics & fecal transplants, and research into how antibiotics destroy bacteria that interact with ghrelin & leptin and thus interfere with the body's ability to regulate weight gain, which as they point out makes sense because much of the antibiotics given to animals raised for food in this country are used to promote faster growth. It doesn't appear to be available for free online, but highly recommend to any subscribers, and there is a brief discussion here:

http://www.mnn.com/health/fitness-well-being/blogs/bacterias-vindication

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on November 21, 2012
at 06:20 PM

Thanks for the article. An interesting read!!!

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