1

votes

gut fermentation

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 21, 2013 at 4:09 PM

I am a Reg Nurse and have had gut issues for years. Severe constipation, bloating, pain and generally sick. I have followed a high protein diet for the past 2 year with steamed veggies, goat kefir and goat yogurt. I was eatin fermented veggies but seems to be too much roughage for me. I was diagnosed with severe IBS. My gut will have so much fermentation in it that I am on the ground in pain(esp. right flank) and all I do is tap that area and start to belch which brings some relief, it is worse upon waking. But, this is all with a no grain diet. I am wondering now if I am having a hard time with protein putrification. I take enzymes, HCL, don't drink with my meals, no fruit. I am at a loss! Oh, I also make bone broth, no processed foods and do take probiotics. Thank you for any help and sirection you can give me. I also work part time at a health food store which has led me to the steps I have taken. Thank you again, Kathy

2006ccb2b60f9cc5ba5e8eff8a7abc46

(1533)

on May 21, 2013
at 10:22 PM

ive done this for over five years, meat without much fat, especially game meats dry age perfectly. an open container encourages proper aging instead of the putrification that comes from storing meat in plastic and closed containers. aged meat is extremely tender and amazing, I have eaten five months old lamb that was absolutely delicious and tender, no need to buy store bought probitoics or use digestive enzymes

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on May 21, 2013
at 10:06 PM

One more thing to be clear: the main different between "the fridge" and a cool, dark cellar, is that the meat that is curing can be left alone. Refrigerators have a lot more "traffic", and the meat being "cured" in your method will be exposed to a lote more bad stuff, including uncontrolled sources of moisture.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on May 21, 2013
at 10:05 PM

This is borderline crazy talk. One should absolutely not use an open container in a fridge to age meats. If you want jerky, a dehydrator, a rack in the sun, or hot smoke can work. If you want charcuterie, you should get a book and learn how to prepare it properly (it helps if you have access to a cool, dark cellar). Furthermore "enzymes in the meat will break it down for you"?! - none of that parses into logical sense. Finally if you want a probiotic: take an actual probiotic supplement. Experimenting with the bacteria growing on withered meat is not a smart idea for someone already in pain.

  • 5dad3fcfbabb35749d2e816be1f21f26

    asked by

    (5)
  • Views
    1.6K
  • Last Activity
    1285D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

1 Answers

-2
2006ccb2b60f9cc5ba5e8eff8a7abc46

on May 21, 2013
at 09:26 PM

less veggies and protein and more fat. you might also try making your own dry aged meats by letting them sit out on a rack in the fridge for a week or longer, the enzymes in the meat will start to break it down for you. you can make jerky this way, deer/elk/bison works very well for this. its the best probiotic you can take.

2006ccb2b60f9cc5ba5e8eff8a7abc46

(1533)

on May 21, 2013
at 10:22 PM

ive done this for over five years, meat without much fat, especially game meats dry age perfectly. an open container encourages proper aging instead of the putrification that comes from storing meat in plastic and closed containers. aged meat is extremely tender and amazing, I have eaten five months old lamb that was absolutely delicious and tender, no need to buy store bought probitoics or use digestive enzymes

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on May 21, 2013
at 10:05 PM

This is borderline crazy talk. One should absolutely not use an open container in a fridge to age meats. If you want jerky, a dehydrator, a rack in the sun, or hot smoke can work. If you want charcuterie, you should get a book and learn how to prepare it properly (it helps if you have access to a cool, dark cellar). Furthermore "enzymes in the meat will break it down for you"?! - none of that parses into logical sense. Finally if you want a probiotic: take an actual probiotic supplement. Experimenting with the bacteria growing on withered meat is not a smart idea for someone already in pain.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on May 21, 2013
at 10:06 PM

One more thing to be clear: the main different between "the fridge" and a cool, dark cellar, is that the meat that is curing can be left alone. Refrigerators have a lot more "traffic", and the meat being "cured" in your method will be exposed to a lote more bad stuff, including uncontrolled sources of moisture.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!