0

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Is my potato starch real resistant starch?

Commented on June 11, 2014
Created December 08, 2013 at 9:47 PM

I'm woundering if there are some way of telling if your potato starch really contains resistant starch or if it has been destroyed in the process by heat, etc?

I live in Sweden and don't know if the resistant starch that i get is any good. The package states that it is 100% potato starch.

I've asked the producer about the process they use and got back this:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B9Ljqn-FPupDUHBXQWdZcnB6WXVaY2dfZXp3M3B1ajlfam93/edit?usp=sharing

UPDATE:

Today i measured my blood glucose after taking 4 tbs of the potato starch. Here are the results

before - 5.1 mmol/l

after 30 mins - 5.2 mmol/l

after 60 mins - 5.4 mmol/l

after 90 mins - 5.2 mmol/l

Should rise it a lot more if it weren't legit potato starch right?

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on June 11, 2014
at 07:31 PM

tune in to find out.....

05e260e5bc2acedf51dd24535e2060c9

on June 11, 2014
at 11:52 AM

Go fuck yourself and your elitism :P

47d6c23b03dc8a772c2276fa549bd3ae

(25)

on June 11, 2014
at 09:12 AM

@Matt 11 not much evolution since the potato arrived hereabouts. Getting the resistant starch without the digestible starch is helpful to some, esp if they have blood sugar issues.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on June 10, 2014
at 12:27 PM

Native starch is denser than water and goes straight to the bottom. Pregel starch is made by cooking starch, then drying it and packing it a a soluble ready-to-use powder. It's dextrin, the lickable adhesive formerly used on envelopes and stamps.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on June 10, 2014
at 12:18 PM

When I toured the Argo corn processing facility, cornstarch was the final and most processed product they made. Commercial potato starch in the US is commonly made from the spent process water from french fry and hash brown operations in OR and ID. Industrial processed food. Or box making glue, depending on your end use.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on June 10, 2014
at 12:12 PM

In France it's called fecule.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on June 10, 2014
at 12:11 PM

That is exactly the response expected from an uncooked starch. You don't get any glycemic response until you cook it.

I get sick and tired of "slang science" terms bloggers love. MUFA and PUFA are bad enough. Resistant starch = uncooked starch. Unless you earned the PhD you're not worthy to use the slang. Stick with the kitchen vernacular term.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on June 10, 2014
at 02:34 AM

Yar, but we evolved not eating isolated potato starch. Along the lines of taking a multivitamin in place of foods containing the actual vitamins. An isolate in the place of whole food, that's never better.

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on June 10, 2014
at 12:31 AM

...and what was the answer

05e260e5bc2acedf51dd24535e2060c9

on June 09, 2014
at 11:36 AM

Wow! Thanks! :D

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on December 12, 2013
at 05:56 PM

@swedishMeatloaf - I can't think how the last three lines got three - MY post stopped after a mere 5 lines! And I don't how to edit the extra lines out :(

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on December 12, 2013
at 09:03 AM

sounds legit. bob's red mill p.starch does the same ('goes to the bottom'), assuming brm is legit p.starch. never tried the overnight thing, but i have a feeling it would do the same (go hard).

05e260e5bc2acedf51dd24535e2060c9

on December 12, 2013
at 08:55 AM

I did stir it in cold water and it did go to the bottom. I poured of excess water and let it sit over night on the table. This morning it was like a hard crust on the bottom. Would that mean that it is legit?

05e260e5bc2acedf51dd24535e2060c9

on December 11, 2013
at 10:39 AM

The link goes to this thread ;)

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on December 10, 2013
at 08:13 AM

Should read "starches" in 3rd line, not starves...

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on December 10, 2013
at 08:11 AM

It looks good - hasn't been subjected to heating so should be oK. There is a HUGE thread here

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread73514.html

about resistant starves and somewhere Tatertot has posted how to tell if the starch you have is starch or dried cooked potato - to do with stirring some into cold water, leaving it and seeing if it goes glue-y, or precipitates out and falls to the bottom of the glass. Worth reading...

05e260e5bc2acedf51dd24535e2060c9

on December 09, 2013
at 02:59 PM

And raw potatoes is not that good tasting ;)

05e260e5bc2acedf51dd24535e2060c9

on December 09, 2013
at 02:57 PM

que? :P

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on December 09, 2013
at 02:31 AM

In the specific case of potato starch used as a supplement, I think there are potentially good reasons. Even after chilling you supposedly lose most of the resistant starch that was there before you cooked it.

Medium avatar

(238)

on December 09, 2013
at 01:43 AM

I'd guess that the majority of the readers of PH don't read the language, I sure don't, just doing my bit for public service. Does that meet with your approval?

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on December 09, 2013
at 12:56 AM

He's Swedish, he doesn't need Google Translate. :)

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6 Answers

best answer

0
47d6c23b03dc8a772c2276fa549bd3ae

(25)

on March 21, 2014
at 10:03 AM

Most likely any retail Potato Starch is going to be just that - raw starch extracted from potato, sometimes also labelled "kartoffel starke". I also see it sold as "Potato flour" in the UK and that is usually also potato starch in the same way that corn starch sold as a thickener is also sold as cornflour.

,

Retail potato starch or "kartoffel starke" is almost certain to be the right stuff, most things labelled "potato flour" are also just potato starch in the same way that retail corn starch and cornflour are the same thing.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on June 10, 2014
at 12:12 PM

In France it's called fecule.

0
Medium avatar

on June 06, 2014
at 06:18 PM

Hey there @SwedishMeatloaf

I had Dr. Justin answer your question on BWR. Your question was answered at (20:45)

http://beyondwellnessradio.com/beyond-wellness-radio-episode-4-listener-questions/

I know this is super late, but I hope it is helpful.

05e260e5bc2acedf51dd24535e2060c9

on June 09, 2014
at 11:36 AM

Wow! Thanks! :D

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on June 10, 2014
at 12:31 AM

...and what was the answer

0
4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on December 10, 2013
at 08:12 AM

It looks good - hasn't been subjected to heating so should be oK. There is a HUGE thread here

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread73514.html

about resistant starves and somewhere Tatertot has posted how to tell if the starch you have is starch or dried cooked potato - to do with stirring some into cold water, leaving it and seeing if it goes glue-y, or precipitates out and falls to the bottom of the glass. Worth reading...

05e260e5bc2acedf51dd24535e2060c9

on December 11, 2013
at 10:39 AM

The link goes to this thread ;)

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on December 10, 2013
at 08:13 AM

Should read "starches" in 3rd line, not starves...

05e260e5bc2acedf51dd24535e2060c9

on December 12, 2013
at 08:55 AM

I did stir it in cold water and it did go to the bottom. I poured of excess water and let it sit over night on the table. This morning it was like a hard crust on the bottom. Would that mean that it is legit?

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on December 12, 2013
at 05:56 PM

@swedishMeatloaf - I can't think how the last three lines got three - MY post stopped after a mere 5 lines! And I don't how to edit the extra lines out :(

Medium avatar

(10611)

on June 10, 2014
at 12:27 PM

Native starch is denser than water and goes straight to the bottom. Pregel starch is made by cooking starch, then drying it and packing it a a soluble ready-to-use powder. It's dextrin, the lickable adhesive formerly used on envelopes and stamps.

0
1742a605736a9ef0695b0b2296e1b6b0

on December 09, 2013
at 03:15 AM

Troll [edit by Matt 11]

05e260e5bc2acedf51dd24535e2060c9

on December 09, 2013
at 02:57 PM

que? :P

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on December 10, 2013
at 08:11 AM

It looks good - hasn't been subjected to heating so should be oK. There is a HUGE thread here

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread73514.html

about resistant starves and somewhere Tatertot has posted how to tell if the starch you have is starch or dried cooked potato - to do with stirring some into cold water, leaving it and seeing if it goes glue-y, or precipitates out and falls to the bottom of the glass. Worth reading...

0
Medium avatar

(238)

on December 08, 2013
at 11:38 PM

google translate is a wonderful thing: I think you know more about your PS then most people, Bobs Redmill in the US doesn't provide this level of info,

Production of native starch from potatoes

1.

The potatoes are delivered throughout the campaign to the factories. The campaign typically lasts from late August to mid-December.

2nd The potatoes stored maximum of two days in our stock, otherwise there is a risk of injury.
3rd Loose soil and rocks separated by torrharpning with subsequent stone separator before the potatoes are washed in rotary tvättharpor.
4th A light trap ensures that objects that are lighter than potatoes, for example,blast, separated.
5th To get the potatoes really clean used a dystvätt as last washing step.
6. The potatoes are disintegrated in cutters so that the starch is exposed from the potato cell walls. The saw blade is similar blades mounted on rotating drums which achieves this.
7. The shredded potato pulp, potato reef goes into isk centrisiler. There separated starch and liquid, fruit juice from the fiber fraction. The fiber fraction (cell walls) is refined in our fiber factories.
8. Starch and fruit juice are separated from each other in two stages. Step 1 is a hydrocyclone rig, where the starch is concentrated. Step 2 is a flat filter. In flat filter sucked the juice out and then washed starch cake with clean water.
9. The final wash of the starch occurs in hydrocyclone block where wash water runs counter until the purification of starch is achieved.
10th The pure starch is dewatered on rotary vacuum filter to about 40% moisture content.
11.

The starch is then enters the warm air dryer and dried to equilibrium solids content of about 80%.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on December 09, 2013
at 12:56 AM

He's Swedish, he doesn't need Google Translate. :)

0
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on December 08, 2013
at 11:00 PM

Most likely it's good. Why not just eat potatoes and other real food though?

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on December 09, 2013
at 02:31 AM

In the specific case of potato starch used as a supplement, I think there are potentially good reasons. Even after chilling you supposedly lose most of the resistant starch that was there before you cooked it.

47d6c23b03dc8a772c2276fa549bd3ae

(25)

on June 11, 2014
at 09:12 AM

@Matt 11 not much evolution since the potato arrived hereabouts. Getting the resistant starch without the digestible starch is helpful to some, esp if they have blood sugar issues.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on June 10, 2014
at 12:18 PM

When I toured the Argo corn processing facility, cornstarch was the final and most processed product they made. Commercial potato starch in the US is commonly made from the spent process water from french fry and hash brown operations in OR and ID. Industrial processed food. Or box making glue, depending on your end use.

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