1

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Why is greek yogurt allowed, when dairy is not?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 07, 2011 at 11:49 PM

I dont understand. I was told NO dairy, but greek yogurt is ok. why is that? isnt that classified as dairy?

Ebcbbdcb8b727e69e06eaa102d49a84c

(1804)

on April 26, 2012
at 08:32 PM

Exactly. To each his/her own.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on July 12, 2011
at 04:30 AM

Sorry to give you a hard time, Karen. I knew what you meant.

6a2ea84c2477a67e2722cb7e88a7ca67

(5)

on July 11, 2011
at 06:51 PM

Ambimorph, you are correct. I should not have said "allowed". I do understand what you mean. I should have worded it differently. Thank you for your advice!

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on July 08, 2011
at 04:34 PM

Totally on point.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on July 08, 2011
at 03:44 PM

It's that baby cow thing that sticks. What do vegans have in common with paleos? The baby cow argument.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on July 08, 2011
at 03:33 PM

Fed I am here, healthy and snarky about it. Paleo is hunting and gathering. If you wean yourself off of gasoline you're 95% home and you can start worrying about dairy. And there are a lot of things on my reading list ahead of Taubes.

Medium avatar

(19479)

on July 08, 2011
at 01:58 PM

And by the way, here is the study from The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition that backs up my original point...http://www.ajcn.org/content/74/1/96.abstract

Medium avatar

(19479)

on July 08, 2011
at 01:57 PM

By starting your comment with the word "uh" you automatically cast everything that you said in a smug, self-satisfied, light. Despite this, I understand that milk is designed for mammals (the presence of mammary glands is a defining characteristic) but this does not mean that it is desirable for adult animals to consume on a regular basis (even though lactase production might persist) because of milk's high insulinotropic (insulin stimulating) effects. If you think that chronically elevated insulin levels are ideal, I suggest you read "Good Calories, Bad Calories" by Gary Taubes.

Medium avatar

(19479)

on July 08, 2011
at 01:46 PM

And the word mammal comes from the word mammary gland which is another word for "boob". If adult mammals were "designed" to drink milk than we would continue to nurse well past the point where it is socially acceptable to sup at our mothers boo... I mean mammary gland.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on July 08, 2011
at 01:40 PM

1) Evolution supports milk drinking. I would not exist unless my ancestors had been lactose tolerant. They had adapted to survive on codfish and dairy over perhaps a few hundred beefsteak-free generations. Survival of the fittest. 2) You cannot wish you way back to being a grockette. Evolution - adaptation if you want to give it another name - is a linear irreversible process. Your children will inherit your lactose tolerance if you have any. You can lose yours if you want to by avoiding dairy. But if you do you will have lost a survival tool.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on July 08, 2011
at 12:35 PM

Uh milk is the only food designed for mammals. Not meat, not grain, not fruit or vegetables. If you're not lactose intolerant, that means you're "designed" to eat milk as an adult. Or adapted to eat it. But if you take it that way you have to take the Darwinian view of selection. The fittest survive because they can thrive on a wider range of foods.

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on July 08, 2011
at 07:50 AM

Also the whey is often (largely) removed from greek yoghurt.

66974b2cb291799dcd661b7dec99a9e2

(11121)

on July 08, 2011
at 01:15 AM

Good summary, trouble is 'dairy' is an umbrella term.

Eecc48184707bc26bce631485b5b7e34

(4764)

on July 08, 2011
at 12:32 AM

most of the controversy over dairy surrounds not lactose but the allergenic casein protein, the carb content of milk and plain (non-greek) yogurt and the fact that dairy is not only a nutrient delivery system for a young of that specific species but also a hormone delivery system as well.

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15 Answers

14
100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on July 08, 2011
at 03:06 AM

Sorry, but I'm going to nitpick. I think the word "allowed" creates or reflects the wrong mindset. I can think of at least two alternative approaches that people take in defining paleo diet.

1) You have a health goal. So you consider the (especially evolutionary) arguments that support or undermine the value of a choice like eating dairy or eating fermented dairy, and make your own decision. Many who construe paleo in this way consider at least some dairy to be paleo-compatible, because its constituents are mainly the same as other paleo foods. Since fermented dairy is tolerated by more people, and has the added benefit of probiotics, it is even more likely to be considered to have a place in a healthy diet than dairy in general.

2) You want to understand what paleo people probably ate, and replicate that. Getting non-negligible amounts of milk from an animal almost certainly requires domestication. If paleo is defined as pre-domestication, then no dairy can be paleo. If you argue that some form of domestication that allowed milking could have occurred in paleo HG's, or if you define paleo as extending later into history, or some other argument, you add dairy to the list.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on July 08, 2011
at 01:40 PM

1) Evolution supports milk drinking. I would not exist unless my ancestors had been lactose tolerant. They had adapted to survive on codfish and dairy over perhaps a few hundred beefsteak-free generations. Survival of the fittest. 2) You cannot wish you way back to being a grockette. Evolution - adaptation if you want to give it another name - is a linear irreversible process. Your children will inherit your lactose tolerance if you have any. You can lose yours if you want to by avoiding dairy. But if you do you will have lost a survival tool.

6a2ea84c2477a67e2722cb7e88a7ca67

(5)

on July 11, 2011
at 06:51 PM

Ambimorph, you are correct. I should not have said "allowed". I do understand what you mean. I should have worded it differently. Thank you for your advice!

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on July 12, 2011
at 04:30 AM

Sorry to give you a hard time, Karen. I knew what you meant.

Ebcbbdcb8b727e69e06eaa102d49a84c

(1804)

on April 26, 2012
at 08:32 PM

Exactly. To each his/her own.

11
Eecc48184707bc26bce631485b5b7e34

on July 08, 2011
at 12:38 AM

As best as I can tell, the dairy issue isn't so much a debate but rather an individual issue.

Some will tolerate casein and lactose without issue. They don't get bingey eating diary, or suffer inflammation, or get 'addicted' to it. For them, it's a convenient source of protein and saturated fat.

Others simply don't tolerate casein or lactose very well. They may suffer systemic inflammation or have poor gut tolerance of dairy products. It may trigger bingey/hungry behavior, weight gain, or stall weight loss. They shouldn't eat it.

Many who don't tolerate most dairy do ok with heavy cream due to it's exceptionally low casein and lactose content. Most do fine with butter.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on July 08, 2011
at 04:34 PM

Totally on point.

8
Fa9f340eddbad9a544184c688fa4dcdd

(6433)

on July 08, 2011
at 12:03 AM

It can be confusing because dairy remains something of an unresolved debate amongst Paleos; some see it as a Neolithic agent of disease, others as neither optimal nor harmful and some believe it to be beneficial.

Those that do eat dairy (lacto-Paleo) tend to prefer full fat, raw, grass-fed and/or fermented dairy like Greek yoghurt, believing that this minimises any negatives whilst heightening the positives.

2
Medium avatar

(19479)

on July 08, 2011
at 02:02 AM

I can eat dairy all day with no GI problems, but without a doubt it puts weight on. I'm using it right now for that very reason as I am currently trying to gain weight during a bulking cycle.

Dairy has been shown to create a much larger insulin response than would be expected by its lactose (sugar) content. This makes sense given that insulin is a growth stimulating hormone and milk is designed for baby animals.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on July 08, 2011
at 03:33 PM

Fed I am here, healthy and snarky about it. Paleo is hunting and gathering. If you wean yourself off of gasoline you're 95% home and you can start worrying about dairy. And there are a lot of things on my reading list ahead of Taubes.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on July 08, 2011
at 03:44 PM

It's that baby cow thing that sticks. What do vegans have in common with paleos? The baby cow argument.

Medium avatar

(19479)

on July 08, 2011
at 01:58 PM

And by the way, here is the study from The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition that backs up my original point...http://www.ajcn.org/content/74/1/96.abstract

Medium avatar

(19479)

on July 08, 2011
at 01:46 PM

And the word mammal comes from the word mammary gland which is another word for "boob". If adult mammals were "designed" to drink milk than we would continue to nurse well past the point where it is socially acceptable to sup at our mothers boo... I mean mammary gland.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on July 08, 2011
at 12:35 PM

Uh milk is the only food designed for mammals. Not meat, not grain, not fruit or vegetables. If you're not lactose intolerant, that means you're "designed" to eat milk as an adult. Or adapted to eat it. But if you take it that way you have to take the Darwinian view of selection. The fittest survive because they can thrive on a wider range of foods.

Medium avatar

(19479)

on July 08, 2011
at 01:57 PM

By starting your comment with the word "uh" you automatically cast everything that you said in a smug, self-satisfied, light. Despite this, I understand that milk is designed for mammals (the presence of mammary glands is a defining characteristic) but this does not mean that it is desirable for adult animals to consume on a regular basis (even though lactase production might persist) because of milk's high insulinotropic (insulin stimulating) effects. If you think that chronically elevated insulin levels are ideal, I suggest you read "Good Calories, Bad Calories" by Gary Taubes.

2
3dc940ac9be21e45cf83207814c8cd46

(544)

on July 08, 2011
at 01:42 AM

Two weeks ago, I ate greek yogurt one day, had cramps,and tried again the next day and kaboom! I was in pain and felt that a lump was trying to pass through my system. It took several days of a lot of liquid but no food to clear. So, even though before paleo one month before I was having yogurt (plain) and cheese sometimes with no problem, I decided that it was not for me anymore.

Kale and other calcium rich foods will be my mainstay instead.

2
666de0361be572857ebec0d2ed02674e

on July 08, 2011
at 12:13 AM

Greek yogurt has more protein/fewer carbs than the usual kind. Unless it's loaded down with sugar, that is.

1
11b7b7ba720a5cd43c74a0ef99a16adb

(3448)

on April 26, 2012
at 08:31 PM

I think one reason dairy is confusing is because it should really be broken down into several categories:

Milk - tons of lactose and gives some people problems; high glycemic index.

Butter - how often do you hear a paleo say they don't eat dairy, then say they cook with butter; it's still dairy isn't it?

Cheese - contains almost no lactose; low glycemic index.

Cream - identical to milk in most ways except thicker, low lactose and low glycemic index.

And then of course, there is dairy from different sources--cow, goat, and so on--which all have their own unique attributes.

Dairy is such a broad term that it makes more sense (imho) to think of it in sub-categories instead of super broad terms.

1
B14dc4aa1ddefbec3bc09550428ee493

on July 08, 2011
at 06:54 AM

I don't see anything wrong with dairy provided you don't have an allergy or intolerance to it. To me, paleo is not about eating exactly WHAT Grok ate, but eating HOW he ate, which would be in such a way that you get full nutrition, keep your insulin levels down and avoid all the added non-food garbage that's in processed foods. Grok's diet had those qualities and I feel that is what we are shooting for, not an exact replica of what he ate. Otherwise why aren't we all eating bugs and worms too? I'm pretty sure those would have been a part of his diet.

0
04f677cde526989553470231bc5c7ae3

on July 12, 2013
at 02:44 PM

I thought we lived in a free country. We have freedom of choice. Why should a group of powerful lobbyist be trying to squeeze out soy yogurt and almond yogurt? I do not want Greek yogurt so why are they trying to force people to eat it? The prices on all yogurt is sky high. It seems to me that this whole problem is about money and control!

0
08db72ae00edfb3c0b93df8a467cb201

(10)

on April 11, 2013
at 07:54 AM

Yogurt is allowed because its low in lactose. Even people with lactose intolerance can eat yogurt with no difficulties whatsoever. And to add the discussion above about lactose intolerance,in some people the lactase-producing cells in the small intestine will not "atrophy" if they are not regularly stimulated by the presence of lactose. First of all, your body either makes the lactase enzyme for life or it gradually diminishes production with age. Nothing you usually eat or don't eat really affects this in any way. (However disease, drugs or damage to the small intestine can also stop production, either temporarily or permanently, but that's a relatively tiny number of cases.)

0
4afdd68e8b5c0d145c062b6c3b24a764

on February 06, 2013
at 05:15 PM

Its very simple...

The bacterial cultures added to milk to make yogurt degrade the lactose (into more simple sugars). Greek yogurt is known to have even less lactose than other regular yogurts.... If you have been told not to drink milk because of lactose intolerance then here is your answer.

best,

B.

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 27, 2012
at 06:09 AM

Greek yogurt is dairy, which means it's not "paleo". If you want to eat Greek yogurt or other dairy, do so.

0
3ab5e1b9eba22a071f653330b7fc9579

on April 26, 2012
at 08:01 PM

Here is the thing, some people think it is ok while others do not. In my opinion it all depends on how well you tolerate it. For example, when I consume too much dairy my skin breaks out, so it is better for me to go without, but my husband can have yogurt and put grass fed cheese on his burger and be fine. Ultimately it is you who decides if greek yogurt is for you or not, if you are still having skin or digestive problems you should cut it out for a while and see how you feel.

0
Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on July 08, 2011
at 12:16 AM

Why do you care if "paleo" allows dairy or not? Look at the evidence. Make up your own mind.

0
62f89aa727cf3ce77c36651347cabc14

(884)

on July 08, 2011
at 12:06 AM

Lactose is the enemy and it is not present in significant amounts in greek yogurt, heavy cream, and cheese.

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on July 08, 2011
at 07:50 AM

Also the whey is often (largely) removed from greek yoghurt.

66974b2cb291799dcd661b7dec99a9e2

(11121)

on July 08, 2011
at 01:15 AM

Good summary, trouble is 'dairy' is an umbrella term.

Eecc48184707bc26bce631485b5b7e34

(4764)

on July 08, 2011
at 12:32 AM

most of the controversy over dairy surrounds not lactose but the allergenic casein protein, the carb content of milk and plain (non-greek) yogurt and the fact that dairy is not only a nutrient delivery system for a young of that specific species but also a hormone delivery system as well.

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