0

votes

Why is GrassFed meat so chewy?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 07, 2013 at 5:51 PM

No matter how I cook it --I feel as if I chew on it forever--why so tough?

9055f14c31610afd4d3068ec48eb6d90

(984)

on February 11, 2013
at 04:47 PM

I have tried crockpot-- dries out no matter how few hours

3327924660b1e2f8f8fc4ca27fedf2b2

(2919)

on February 07, 2013
at 10:05 PM

Have you tried simply straight up boiling it?

  • 0d2b1ff450021cca6683e4cecf2d6aec

    asked by

    (589)
  • Views
    4.8K
  • Last Activity
    1279D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

7 Answers

8
3eca93d2e56dfcd768197dc5a50944f2

(11697)

on February 07, 2013
at 06:02 PM

Because that's how real meat is. It's not marshmallows. If you also eat pastured goat, sheep, etc, or even a 3 year old pastured hen, they're all chewy. They have little fat, and they're all muscle. Because they have actually walked in their life, and have exercised their muscles. Grain-fed, crowded cows have never stretched their legs or ran. They have no muscle. They're sick and fluffy, like couch-potato people. It's just that you got used to their no-muscle meat. Unlearn it with time.

1
Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

on February 08, 2013
at 09:08 PM

It depends on the cut, too. Cheaper cuts are tougher and need to be cooked longer to break down connective tissue. Or, freeze and slice thin... always remember to cut across the grain.

1
4debe57f81d507bcb844f10b2ef38a83

(398)

on February 07, 2013
at 09:41 PM

Marinating in something acidic and/or salty helps. So does cooking the meat until it falls apart. Pork is usually pretty tender too, and even pasture fed pork has a good bit of fat.

1
5f678ffff153bfc8a17ac1ee438c054f

on February 07, 2013
at 08:01 PM

I agree that it is very chewy, but I found that mixing in a sort of dry ingredient like almond meal or some other breadcrumb-type replacement helps if you are making patties, meatballs, or meatloaf!

0
A9a0ee4659821ef1b8d88bc3b2d10397

on February 11, 2013
at 04:07 PM

Most custom slaughter houses will age beef in the frig. Our beef is dry aged at least 14 days before it is cut up, vacuum bagged and frozen.

Meat toughness is tough to diagnose. First, grass fed beef can be variable due to season of the year as well as the producer's practice. Secondly, there is less intramuscular fat which helps to make the beef feel more tender (prime graded meat has LOTS of fat). Grass fed beef cooks very fast compared to corn fed. This causes most people to over-cook GF beef until they develop the new techniques needed. GF beef usually needs more marinading or wet cooking. Crock pot and dutch oven meals are to die for. The beef flavor comes through and you get all the health benefits. So, cook GF beef at a lower temp and cook it slower. Sear the meat and then cook over indirect heat on your grill. Try the other cuts like roasts and ribs! You will not be disappointed in the flavor. We are always using the cooked rib drippings to make wonderful beef soup. Soup bones are a meal all by themselves!

Enjoy the journey......its worth it

9055f14c31610afd4d3068ec48eb6d90

(984)

on February 11, 2013
at 04:47 PM

I have tried crockpot-- dries out no matter how few hours

0
C5173ccd1a8198ef8d681ad4ca4df4e0

on February 07, 2013
at 08:57 PM

It's not supposed to be chewy, but you can't avoid that in this modern age. Lean meat is not automatically chewy: 100 years ago people slaughtered an animal and let it "age" in a dark dry place, which gave the meat the chance to become tender. Today, due to food regulations, meat must be blasted with frigid air within minutes of slaughter. this messes up some elements that act in the meat to tenderize it. this is why we think only fatty meat is tender. the only really tender lean meat you can experience today is if you eat deer: hunters generally don't have a massive fridge on hand when they make the kill and the meat has some time at room temperature to become tender before it is freezed.

0
3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on February 07, 2013
at 08:56 PM

Last night I came home and smelled my husband's beef stew cooking. I'm not a big fan of his stew, it always smells and tastes great, but the grassfed meat is always so tough it's unpleasant. But I was surprised to find this was tender and delicious.

Turns out it was grassfed GOAT. It was wonderful. It tasted beefy to me, probably in part because he cooked it in beef broth. The farmer suggested braising was the best way to prepare this cut (sholder chops) and she was absolutely correct. YUM!

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!