2

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What to do with grassfed chuck steaks?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 07, 2013 at 12:44 AM

My meat CSA share included a couple of chuck steaks .5 lb each. I haven't cooked chuck meat much before, but from what I know it's considered to be a tougher type of meat and the most common technique is braising or slow roasting. However, I'm not sure I have enough meat for that.

I also got this book called "Tender Grassfed Meat", but there's nothing on chuck steak there. Anyone has any ideas?

Medium avatar

(5639)

on January 30, 2012
at 06:42 PM

Doesn't the moist heat in the oven ruin the sear?

7e837e99127e0696d0bbbebeba777ba2

(10)

on December 07, 2011
at 01:53 PM

Don't own a slowcooker, but thanks anyway!

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 07, 2011
at 12:05 AM

The connective tissue is part of what makes it so good for your joints.

D5cde8031564f905260ce9aa7a1f5e2c

(1170)

on December 06, 2011
at 06:28 PM

No, I just salt both sides, let it get close to room temp, blot the moisture that accumulates, add pepper, and sear.

7e837e99127e0696d0bbbebeba777ba2

(10)

on December 06, 2011
at 04:53 PM

Do you premarinade them? The author of Tender Grassfed Meat advises against using salt or vinegar in marinades because it can make grassfed beef tougher.

7e837e99127e0696d0bbbebeba777ba2

(10)

on December 06, 2011
at 03:23 PM

I thought it's better not to heat PUFAs because they easily oxidize?

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on December 06, 2011
at 01:03 PM

Haven't we banned the whole "nom, nom" thing? ;) Pot roast is a good idea, though. I just took 3 cross rib steaks (kinda tough), tenderized by pounding, seared in onions and garlic, cut into small bites and threw them into a bone broth I made over the weekend. They simmered with veggies and stufz for about 1-2 hours. It was delish and not tough at all.

1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

(6719)

on December 06, 2011
at 05:12 AM

do it. . . . . .

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17 Answers

2
2b2c2e4aa87e9aa4c99cae48e980f70d

(1059)

on December 06, 2011
at 08:19 AM

Pot roast in a slow cooker = nom, nom, nom! The shredded beef from an amazing Venezuelan dish called Pabellon Criollo.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on December 06, 2011
at 01:03 PM

Haven't we banned the whole "nom, nom" thing? ;) Pot roast is a good idea, though. I just took 3 cross rib steaks (kinda tough), tenderized by pounding, seared in onions and garlic, cut into small bites and threw them into a bone broth I made over the weekend. They simmered with veggies and stufz for about 1-2 hours. It was delish and not tough at all.

7e837e99127e0696d0bbbebeba777ba2

(10)

on December 07, 2011
at 01:53 PM

Don't own a slowcooker, but thanks anyway!

1
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 06, 2011
at 09:03 PM

I don't mind texture in my beef at all. Chuck is the majority of beef that I buy and if it's a roast I slice it into portions while raw, freeze the portions and use low-to-medium heat in my skillet. It is not technically slow-cooked as it's about 20-30 minutes start to finish.

It's a 3-step thing: do 2 slices of bacon, take out when ready; cook the beef in the bacon fat--if there are thick seams of fat in the chuck I excise them and cook them to crispy; dump some bone broth or bone broth stew into the skillet when the beef is nearly done and thoroughly heat the broth/stew. To add veggies: add raw veggies when the beef is browned on one side; add cooked veggies when the broth/stew is added.

If the beef has a lot of texture, I slice it across the grain and dip it in broth with every bite.

1
48e51a7af3adc13503c37f4385ac19f2

(105)

on December 06, 2011
at 08:24 PM

I use chuck steak to make delicious grass-fed beef jerky. There is a great marinating recipe on latestinpaleo.com

1
5e816d3249fd4bceb096d4ae7183df1a

on December 06, 2011
at 04:54 PM

Save them up and make the best chili ever. It can be used like chuck roast. I started getting extra chuck roast from my meat CSA to make this recipe.

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/True-Texas-Chili-355049

1
D5cde8031564f905260ce9aa7a1f5e2c

on December 06, 2011
at 04:34 PM

Sear each side, then finish for five (high heat) to ten (medium heat) minutes in the oven. Cut across the grain and it'll be relatively tender and very flavorful. Chuck steaks are my favorite.

7e837e99127e0696d0bbbebeba777ba2

(10)

on December 06, 2011
at 04:53 PM

Do you premarinade them? The author of Tender Grassfed Meat advises against using salt or vinegar in marinades because it can make grassfed beef tougher.

D5cde8031564f905260ce9aa7a1f5e2c

(1170)

on December 06, 2011
at 06:28 PM

No, I just salt both sides, let it get close to room temp, blot the moisture that accumulates, add pepper, and sear.

Medium avatar

(5639)

on January 30, 2012
at 06:42 PM

Doesn't the moist heat in the oven ruin the sear?

1
D9032e4f6540f9e6bcbb07143002bedd

(449)

on December 06, 2011
at 03:40 PM

Definitely pot roast whole. You ca use them in stews but if it's something you're going to be storing and reheating it may fall apart on you.

Salt and pepper your meat. Over med high heat sear with bacon grease in a big cast iron pot with lid, then remove the meat and reduce the heat. Over medium (in the same large cast iron pot) cook down some garlic and onions. Once tender add 2 inches of red wine and a bunch of rosemary. Put the steak back in and throw it in a 350 oven for 2 to 3 hours depending on weight.

1
24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on December 06, 2011
at 12:01 PM

Stew and pot roasts. I don't know how paleo this is, but for pot roast I use roughly 1c wine, 1/4c worchestershire sauce and tamari and some garlic. First I sear the roast in butter, add liquids then enough of whatever bone broth I've got to cover, bring to boil then into the oven at 300 for a couple of hours. (I don't own a slow cooker). I throw potatoes and carrots into the liquid later. Yum! Per Ina Garten, I usually use chix broth for beef stews. Dunno why but it works very well.

1
13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on December 06, 2011
at 12:00 PM

Putting them in a slow cooker or braising them for a few hours will result in deliciousness.

1
D3f3b91d1dd9ce60865654faeb2ec809

on December 06, 2011
at 04:58 AM

Eat them. Raw.

Source(s): personal experience.

1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

(6719)

on December 06, 2011
at 05:12 AM

do it. . . . . .

0
D101b6813c1a350a9650f2268dcb7383

on December 12, 2011
at 05:14 AM

Try the healthy and yummy grass fed steaks from www.gihealthy.com

0
Medium avatar

on December 06, 2011
at 11:28 PM

I'm tempted to say, Send to a vegan, except what a waste of good food just to offend someone.

0
158869f619d22104a2c7ad32d7406c20

on December 06, 2011
at 10:55 PM

same thing you do with grain feed chuck roast

0
C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

on December 06, 2011
at 09:17 PM

Chuck has a great deal of connective tissue, which makes it tough initially. However, the muscle fibers themselves are not particularly tough, which is why it stands up well to thorough cooking in a high heat-transfer environment like a braise or stew. When you apply wet heat over a couple hours, all that connective tissue dissolves into gelatin, making the resulting steak/roast/stew cubes fork tender and delicious.

However, if what you have is chuck eye (and it's probably not but hear me out), it is cut from right next to the rib eye and is tender enough to be cooked like steak.

Also, it's possible to treat chuck like a cheaper brisket, and slow cook it in moist heat for hours and hours.

More on chuck: http://www.foodsubs.com/MeatBeefChuck.html

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 07, 2011
at 12:05 AM

The connective tissue is part of what makes it so good for your joints.

0
724f0f45eb53919b8c617c3c1ec5fbc5

(830)

on December 06, 2011
at 08:56 PM

You could tenderize the steaks by pounding them out thin before broiling, grilling, or dry-frying them in a cast-iron pan. This has the advantage of being quicker than braising, but braising is delicious, too.

Chuck is a cut with great flavor, but since it's pretty tough, mechanical tenderizing or low, slow cooking is the best bet.

0
D8c04730b5d016a839b3c5b932bf59dd

on December 06, 2011
at 06:16 AM

I do small pieces in my crock pot all the time. Heats on the sides, so they won't burn. But yah, add yummy beef broth and have stew.

0
Efb47c593dd43c97747081031aa7fa2f

on December 06, 2011
at 05:53 AM

You can "pot roast" them on the stove if you have a pan with a tightly fitting lid to keep the juices in.

I coat the meat with oil (flaxseed) to reduce sticking.

If you want steak like meal, brown the meat in the pot after it's cooked to tenderness.

Mirror finish stainless steel exteriors are very effective at keeping in the heat, so you can roast the meet at a very low heat for a few hours.

All in all - less energy use, less cleanup and a bit easier than oven roasting for small quantities.

7e837e99127e0696d0bbbebeba777ba2

(10)

on December 06, 2011
at 03:23 PM

I thought it's better not to heat PUFAs because they easily oxidize?

0
Ef4c5b09fdccf73be575d3a0c267fdd9

(2539)

on December 06, 2011
at 04:56 AM

Put them in a stew! Or make shredded beef but 0.5 lb will shrink alot so a stew is probably better.

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