5

votes

Grass fed percentages

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 19, 2011 at 12:16 AM

Since federal law in the US requires cows to be grass fed (pastured) at least 4 months out of the year, a company can be slick with their labeling and say "grass fed". Maybe as a community we can all start advocating for % of grass fed to be labeled.

78972387772c994caa78513a83978437

(2290)

on August 23, 2011
at 07:10 PM

For beef to be considered "American Grassfed", their standards from 2009 state that: "Grass and forage shall be the feed source consumed for the lifetime of the ruminant animal, with the exception of milk consumed prior to weaning. The diet shall be derived solely from forage consisting of grass (annual and perennial), forbs (e.g. Legumes, Brassica), browse, or cereal grain crops in the vegetative (pre-grain) state. Animals cannot be fed grain or grain byproducts (starch and protein sources) and must have continuous access to pasture." We should look for the AGA label on beef.

11838116de44ae449df0563f09bd3d73

(655)

on August 19, 2011
at 03:14 PM

Your thinking a lot of people here can judge the quality of cattle raising operation?

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on August 19, 2011
at 12:30 AM

I agree this labeling is a problem. Testing of my meat has revealed problems

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5 Answers

1
D1bd0f9e3a4269d04886a8f4ea195e11

on August 23, 2011
at 06:02 PM

Rather than looking for USDA-certified grassfed labeling, look for certification from the American Grassfed Association. All AGA-certified livestock is fed a diet of grass and forage from weaning until harvest and is raised exclusively on pasture. Visit the web site to find an AGA-certified producer and to learn more. www.americangrassfed.org

1
F5e7938e6fe43e705d36ae30e6327fc2

on August 19, 2011
at 06:17 AM

Get to know a farmer who raises their own grass raised and finished beef, buy a lot of it and keep it in your freezer. Problem solved... know your farmer.

11838116de44ae449df0563f09bd3d73

(655)

on August 19, 2011
at 03:14 PM

Your thinking a lot of people here can judge the quality of cattle raising operation?

0
Babcd63ecd0f6fb973d8beb7a7f1a326

on August 23, 2011
at 10:18 PM

What federal law does the original question refer to? I am not familiar with any "four month law." The USDA labeling standard for Grass (Forage) Fed is straight forward - paraphrasing here but can post entire standard if requested -- grass and forage only for lifetime of animal, except milk during weaning, continuous access to pasture during growing season, no grain or grain byproducts at any time.

0
78972387772c994caa78513a83978437

on August 23, 2011
at 06:51 PM

Consider buying your beef from the internet if you can't find a farmer nearby. Realize that you'll be buying a Lot of meat at once (big investment up front), but the price per pound will be a lot cheaper. You can buy a Quarter Cow (around 80lb) at once. Here are a few cattle farmers that I trust:

Check out: Double R Cattle Services: http://doublercattleservices.com/beef.aspx (This is where I travel to get mine. I'm not sure if they ship, but you can shoot them an email and ask)

Aldersprings Ranch: http://www.alderspring.com/ (They definitely ship. My husband used to buy from them).

0
E286e6ba6ef6c4c4a31a749e59aa57e1

on August 19, 2011
at 02:47 AM

Dr.Cordain mentions that grass fed meat will have an orange-ish color to the fat, from the Beta Carotene in the grass. I have yet to see any fat which has that though.

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