10

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Which kind of sandwich bread is best to cheat with?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 11, 2011 at 5:33 AM

Sometimes I do want to splurge and get a deli sandwich for lunch (I still do think the sandwich is one of the best inventions ever).

The question is, which kind is the lesser of all evils - wheat, multi-grain, rye, pumpernickel, a wrap?

Some of you may scoff at this question, but I am serious. I went paleo only a few months ago, and not for any particular reason. I'm 27, male, I've been thin my whole life, and I don't have any illnesses. I just want to eat healthier, look good, and live longer, without eating crap that makes me feel bad.

Mark's Daily Apple talks about an 80/20 rule, so I eat a sandwich once a week or so. Is that so bad? Does anyone else live mostly paleo and sometimes eat a sandwich?

F850d793ff83a8deac524a459e520bf3

(108)

on November 13, 2011
at 01:27 PM

I used to be the totally like you, but after a while the desire even for that one token sandwich went away for good.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on November 13, 2011
at 05:18 AM

Sourdough for sure but real sourdough will be hard to find at most sandwich shops. I'd go for rye.

Medium avatar

(3024)

on November 12, 2011
at 07:49 PM

Yes, most rye bread is part wheat and part rye, but that's still preferable to all wheat. And if you ask around, it may be possible to find one that's mostly rye or some other grain like spelt.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 11, 2011
at 07:12 PM

I hesitated to say rye in my answer because every label I checked also includes wheat--frequently before rye.

7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on November 11, 2011
at 12:05 PM

I do more of a 95/5 ... mostly paleo/PHD and one meal a week I eat what I like. It's a don't let perfect be the enemy of the good kind of thing. If eating a sandwich once a week works for you, I say go for it! You can always revisit this as your experience with paleo deepens.

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5 Answers

9
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 11, 2011
at 05:39 AM

Artisan quality sourdough might be a reasonable choice. I've read that the cheap, mechanized process ruins the benefits but true sourdough is a slower process involving fermentation and it's better for you than some.

BUT, if you are sensitive to wheat bread is a really risky splurge because recovery time may be longer than the intervals between splurges.

7
Medium avatar

on November 11, 2011
at 05:43 AM

They make gluten-free bread now that doesn't taste too bad. It's usually made out of some kind of combination of potato/rice/corn starch. If you're going to eat bread, it's probably the least toxic choice. Local health food store should have a couple types.

5
Medium avatar

(3024)

on November 11, 2011
at 11:29 AM

Sourdough bread for sure. The longer it is left to rise, the more the gluten and anti-nutrients (the reason you don't want to eat it in the first place) break down. Ask the baker how long it rises.

Rye and other grains are better choices than wheat.

Should be from a baker, and not supermarket bread, which is likely to have all sorts of unnecessary crap in it.

Sourdough also tastes way better, imho.

My very sensitive friend could feel the difference. One slice of regular bread makes her feel like crap. She was able to eat 2 slices of good quality sourdough rye and barely feel it the consequences.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 11, 2011
at 07:12 PM

I hesitated to say rye in my answer because every label I checked also includes wheat--frequently before rye.

Medium avatar

(3024)

on November 12, 2011
at 07:49 PM

Yes, most rye bread is part wheat and part rye, but that's still preferable to all wheat. And if you ask around, it may be possible to find one that's mostly rye or some other grain like spelt.

4
6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on November 11, 2011
at 11:24 AM

I don't know what will have the least impact long term, but as for short term misery, or lack thereof, real sourdough has had the fewest gastrointestinal side effects for me.

Also the less fiber the better as far as my body is concerned, cheap hotdog bun or bagette, no problemo; whole wheat and I'll be feeling iffy in the digestive department for days (although Ezekial bread for some reason seems a little easier on my tummy than basic whole wheat sandwich loaf, and I'm guessing it is higher in fiber, maybe because the grain is sprouted first).

1
8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e

on November 13, 2011
at 04:47 AM

I have had Udi's gluten-free bread-like products like - bread, pizza crust, bagel, etc. in early Paleo. They taste a lot better then most gluten-free products.

I haven't had them in a long while, because I haven't craved them in awhile.

If cheating, probably best with non-gluten grains.

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