3

votes

least harmful grain or pseudograin

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 22, 2012 at 6:07 PM

i am going to transform my entire backyard into a microfarm next spring in order to cut food costs. i would like to grow some calorie dense crops, so im womdering out of all the known grains (including less popular ones like buckwheat), what is considered the least damaging, after sprouting and fermenting?

363d0a0277a8b61ada3a24ab3ad85d5a

(4642)

on December 24, 2012
at 09:11 PM

That is a good point Luckie - I forgot to mention that the square footage needed for a quart of grain is much larger than something like a potato. Squashes sprawl out a bit but can keep bearing fruit really late into the season, so I really like those root cellar type foods.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10490)

on December 24, 2012
at 03:17 PM

+1 for potatoes. I grew my own last year and they were incredible. I grew two varieties and ate them both young and stored. There also pretty easy to grow and harvest, unlike grains, and take up little room.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on December 24, 2012
at 01:49 AM

+1 for beans and corn.

2e6e673ce3eb647407d260d4d57a731b

(1021)

on December 24, 2012
at 01:31 AM

actually it seems easy enough. southern exposure seed co has a couple 'upland' varieties that can grow on reguar soil http://www.southernexposure.com/rice-m101-grain-7-g-p-542.html

93eea7754e6e94b6085dbabbb48c0bb7

on December 24, 2012
at 01:01 AM

Yea I guess it is kinda hard...oops.

2e6e673ce3eb647407d260d4d57a731b

(1021)

on December 24, 2012
at 12:44 AM

oh man i would love to grow rice. its definitely one of the most tolerable grains

3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on December 24, 2012
at 12:17 AM

Isn't rice really hard to grow?

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on December 23, 2012
at 11:32 PM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5qyuMGSFBog - How to grow potatoes in a bucket

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on December 23, 2012
at 11:31 PM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5qyuMGSFBog

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on December 23, 2012
at 07:48 AM

Like others have said, potatoes will serve your needs better than grain.

2e6e673ce3eb647407d260d4d57a731b

(1021)

on December 23, 2012
at 03:13 AM

wise words .

4a3611b0503cbc5ee14d8d1d566c7f44

(124)

on December 22, 2012
at 07:12 PM

you're funny; and I agree, grow potatoes.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on December 22, 2012
at 07:01 PM

Okay, address ?

2e6e673ce3eb647407d260d4d57a731b

(1021)

on December 22, 2012
at 06:16 PM

make me .

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on December 22, 2012
at 06:11 PM

Grow potatoes !

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8 Answers

best answer

5
363d0a0277a8b61ada3a24ab3ad85d5a

(4642)

on December 23, 2012
at 06:00 AM

I grew up on a small farm and grains can actually be a huge pain to grow. You need to invest in specialized equipment and be prepared to thresh! If you really want a grain, I would go with corn (easy harvest) or with legumes, since beans and peas are easy to harvest too, dry out the pods, then there you go.

If I could grow a grain/seed without the harvest hassle, I would probably try to grow quinoa, but soak and sprout it before eating (tastes better to me this way too), but I have no idea how hard it is, seeing how tiny the seeds are, it looks like there could be some annoying drying and husking to do. I have seen some store bought quinoa seeds with a tiny hard husk on the outside, not sure how hard that is to remove, maybe soaking would be enough to take it off. I would also grow oats if I could, but that also seems difficult. I am sure there are some websites on home growing grains. I do eat occasional white rice and oats with no problems.

I kind of agree with the potato post.. we didn't grow potatoes until I was like 13 or so, but when we did, wow were they just amazing, the best I'd ever had, and still to this day. Nothing so silky as truly fresh potatoes. Same for fresh out of the ground carrots - they're just divine.

Enjoy your garden! I miss gardening so much, it is so fruitful, I can't wait to move out of the city and get back to it.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on December 24, 2012
at 01:49 AM

+1 for beans and corn.

363d0a0277a8b61ada3a24ab3ad85d5a

(4642)

on December 24, 2012
at 09:11 PM

That is a good point Luckie - I forgot to mention that the square footage needed for a quart of grain is much larger than something like a potato. Squashes sprawl out a bit but can keep bearing fruit really late into the season, so I really like those root cellar type foods.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10490)

on December 24, 2012
at 03:17 PM

+1 for potatoes. I grew my own last year and they were incredible. I grew two varieties and ate them both young and stored. There also pretty easy to grow and harvest, unlike grains, and take up little room.

best answer

1
93eea7754e6e94b6085dbabbb48c0bb7

on December 23, 2012
at 10:19 PM

What about white rice? It is technically a grain and "safe starch".

3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on December 24, 2012
at 12:17 AM

Isn't rice really hard to grow?

2e6e673ce3eb647407d260d4d57a731b

(1021)

on December 24, 2012
at 01:31 AM

actually it seems easy enough. southern exposure seed co has a couple 'upland' varieties that can grow on reguar soil http://www.southernexposure.com/rice-m101-grain-7-g-p-542.html

2e6e673ce3eb647407d260d4d57a731b

(1021)

on December 24, 2012
at 12:44 AM

oh man i would love to grow rice. its definitely one of the most tolerable grains

93eea7754e6e94b6085dbabbb48c0bb7

on December 24, 2012
at 01:01 AM

Yea I guess it is kinda hard...oops.

8
A6f8919d7e5ee99771c266a8ba53e186

on December 22, 2012
at 10:02 PM

Grow weed instead, then sell it. You can afford to buy any foods you desire.

2e6e673ce3eb647407d260d4d57a731b

(1021)

on December 23, 2012
at 03:13 AM

wise words .

3
0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on December 23, 2012
at 02:28 AM

Not grains necessarily, but when I am able to do this myself the first things I plan to grow are sweet potatoes, then maybe some beets, carrots and something green.

3
90bcfafd2ef73fea5398c483c593349e

on December 23, 2012
at 01:30 AM

Nutritionally speaking I'd say quinoa would be the best non-grain to grow. Whether it will grow in your climate is another question. Space is also a concern. I'm not sure just how micro your farm is going to be, but growing grains in any useful quantity takes a fair amount of space. Research that before making any final decisions.

Potatoes are probably your best bet if you're looking for starch. Fruit trees can also be absurdly productive and produce calorie-dense foods.

3
Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on December 22, 2012
at 09:46 PM

According to Stephen Guyunet, buckwheat has a lot of phytase in it, which means the phytic acid is effectively broken down during soaking and fermenting. It's also high in protein.

2
3327924660b1e2f8f8fc4ca27fedf2b2

(2919)

on December 23, 2012
at 01:15 AM

Quinoa probably. Saponins don't seem to be much of an issue to most people.

1
Ee6932fe54ad68039a8d5f7a8caa0468

(2668)

on December 22, 2012
at 07:29 PM

WAPF would point you to rye.

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