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Help required for first experimental "ad in" non-paleo meal addition

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 15, 2011 at 5:47 PM

I know this is subjective to body type, reaction, metabolic rate and so on, but I consider myself very healthy (pre and post paleo diet) with none of the typical irritations that require a stricter paleo adherence. I am thinking of trying to add in wild rice/oats and/or quinoa/couscous simply because I enjoy them and I know my kids do as well. And they often ask for it back in our diet!. Does anyone have any similar experiences adding back such things, or perhaps, what are your ideas on the least toxic grains? ie wild/spelt/organic etc. Thanks

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on March 21, 2011
at 08:48 PM

Some people do eat white rice due to it being starch.

4847bfcc9d2c3579ed2fd10da64ced38

(105)

on March 16, 2011
at 08:14 AM

Thanks, any white refined products have long been out of our diet, but as you say, and as Robb Wolf/Dr. Harris mention, as long as you avoid the gluten, fructose and excess linoleic acid, then the odd side pancake mix or grain side shouldn't be a factor. I think I heard Wolf say its about finding your "sweet spot" regarding healthy choice. Dark chocolate almonds and some roast potatos in French duck fat are my luxury...not exactly Burger King'esque!

Aebee51dc2b93b209980a89fa4a70c1e

(1982)

on March 15, 2011
at 06:51 PM

This is a good question for Melissa at Hunt Gather Love

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3 Answers

best answer

1
8f4ff12a53a98f3b5814cfe242de0daa

(1075)

on March 15, 2011
at 07:19 PM

Oats, I think, are not so bad because they are only 1/2 insoluable fiber. Which is along the lines of what a vegetable will have.

That said, I don't eat paleo (not a goal) and my similarity to paleo is in terms of being willing to use coconut oil, limiting grain and avoiding fructose. If you are planning to adhere to paleo, avoiding any form of grain should pretty much be your goal though. That is basically the one commonality that all the paleo variants consider important.

Exception to some extent being white rice because it is nutritionally devoid of anything but starch (so its one way to get starch "safely").

As an aside to that, I've had great luck sticking to natural type foods and only making meals with single ingredient items.

4847bfcc9d2c3579ed2fd10da64ced38

(105)

on March 16, 2011
at 08:14 AM

Thanks, any white refined products have long been out of our diet, but as you say, and as Robb Wolf/Dr. Harris mention, as long as you avoid the gluten, fructose and excess linoleic acid, then the odd side pancake mix or grain side shouldn't be a factor. I think I heard Wolf say its about finding your "sweet spot" regarding healthy choice. Dark chocolate almonds and some roast potatos in French duck fat are my luxury...not exactly Burger King'esque!

best answer

3
Fa9f340eddbad9a544184c688fa4dcdd

(6433)

on March 21, 2011
at 10:02 PM

I understand that this is your decision, but I just can't bring myself to recommend gluten grains, especially when there are so many better grain alternatives available. I suggest that you skip both the couscous (made from durum wheat) and the spelt (which is simply an overpriced wheat analogue that has been over-hyped by the health foods industry). The oats have also likely been cross-contaminated by gluten (most packs will have gluten warnings), so depending on how sensitive you are to gluten, you may want to either avoid, or look for gluten-free certified oats.

Now let's move on to what you can enjoy. ;)

White rice is pretty much pure starch, and is fine to consume as is. Brown rice and quinoa should be soaked beforehand to reduce the antinutrients. I suggest that you check out the Weston A. Price Foundation for more information on this, as what you are proposing seems more in line with their philsophy e.g. grains which have been traditionally prepared by being sprouted, soaked or fermented in order to reduce naturally ocurring toxins. Buckwheat (technically not a grain) can be purchased either as a flour, or in the form of buckwheat groats, which would make a good substitution for oats. Proper preparation and cooking can also massively reduce the problematic aspects of most legumes e.g. butter beans, lentils e.t.c. You could also buy dried corn kernals and make your own popcorn.

0
D631284833b7c21021ad2ba599bf3456

on March 21, 2011
at 07:52 PM

I can add back in white rice or beans from time to time and there are no troubles at all.

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