4

votes

Does gut flora change due to diet?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 12, 2012 at 12:38 AM

I'm asking because i have been eating paleo for about a year now. I used to eat white rice and legumes all the time. I've been eating paleo for about a year. Mostly beef, seafood, veggies and tubers. I had white rice and black beans the other day at a family get together and man was i bloated, gassy and constipated for 2 days after. I just felt off. Does your gut flora change based on the foods you eat? My gut is not used to grains and legumes anymore. I guess it's a good thing.

089dd41b18fbb95ebb5347cded708d98

(5635)

on December 13, 2012
at 12:20 AM

ahaha good one, flourishing.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 12, 2012
at 10:07 PM

Hitler and Kellogg had one major similarity. They were both vegetarians. They came from the era of enema science, when it was believed that there were toxic rotting buildups on the colon's walls. This idea was disproven by 1920. But as they say, you can't keep a crappy idea down.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 12, 2012
at 02:11 PM

Oops meant to comment; but left as answer above.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on December 12, 2012
at 09:52 AM

I like how in the middle of this making up this info you misused the word misnomer.

Af3e3615beba642bcafd0f21d64d74f7

on December 12, 2012
at 07:40 AM

References without the backing of the grain industry please.

Af3e3615beba642bcafd0f21d64d74f7

on December 12, 2012
at 07:39 AM

references without the vacking of the grain industry please.

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9 Answers

3
089dd41b18fbb95ebb5347cded708d98

(5635)

on December 12, 2012
at 01:09 AM

yes 100%

different strains of bacteria are in different digestive tracks based on the food.

3
Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on December 12, 2012
at 01:05 AM

Yes .

3
103a639b040a17bb579084287f2a5307

on December 12, 2012
at 12:49 AM

I don't know for sure, but it would be a reasonable guess. Another possible explanation would be that your body down regulated the production of the enzymes required to digest beans since you don't need those enzymes on the paleo diet.

2
1a6f2cbb348f84b89701f7dbb5cf0aed

on December 12, 2012
at 04:36 AM

I would say so. If your body isn't used to digesting rice and beans, it's not going to do as 'good' of a job as it would if you ate it all the time.

I know for myself, eating too much of something, or the wrong foods creates a lot of discomfort and suffering. Good motivation to skip those foods!

1
6714718e2245e5190017d643a7614157

on December 16, 2012
at 07:34 PM

Of course your diet effects your ecosystem.

http://www.economist.com/node/21560523

1
61a29b577d4c38f00432a16a165e4d1a

on December 16, 2012
at 06:47 PM

Yes. See this recent study showing a reduction in a gut bacterial strain from diet changes reduced obesity.

1
B1002c0e81abb760e87ec46d9caedcf1

on December 12, 2012
at 10:07 AM

A new study shows that what we eat can affect our gut, both inside and out. The community of bacteria that colonize our intestines may shift depending on the makeup of our overall diet. Increasingly, research in the field of gut flora shows that these bugs have a big impact on some crucial bodily functions: they aid digestion and metabolism, affect immunity and determine how many calories we extract from food, possibly contributing to obesity and diabetes, among other health effects.

0
Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 12, 2012
at 02:09 PM

deleted and moved.

-7
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 12, 2012
at 07:07 AM

Meat will contribute to the population of the "bad bacteria", which is why a raw vegan diet is a healthy means to repopulate your "good bacteria" without necessarily taking a probiotic supplement.

The fact that you are attributing grains to your gastrointestinal problems is a misnomer as they are virtually harmless when passing through your digestive tract. Rather, they help to develop the mucus lining which allows better digestion of other foods.

Af3e3615beba642bcafd0f21d64d74f7

on December 12, 2012
at 07:40 AM

References without the backing of the grain industry please.

089dd41b18fbb95ebb5347cded708d98

(5635)

on December 13, 2012
at 12:20 AM

ahaha good one, flourishing.

Af3e3615beba642bcafd0f21d64d74f7

on December 12, 2012
at 07:39 AM

references without the vacking of the grain industry please.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 12, 2012
at 02:11 PM

Oops meant to comment; but left as answer above.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on December 12, 2012
at 09:52 AM

I like how in the middle of this making up this info you misused the word misnomer.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 12, 2012
at 10:07 PM

Hitler and Kellogg had one major similarity. They were both vegetarians. They came from the era of enema science, when it was believed that there were toxic rotting buildups on the colon's walls. This idea was disproven by 1920. But as they say, you can't keep a crappy idea down.

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