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How good is partially grain fed pastured meat?

Answered on November 24, 2013
Created November 23, 2013 at 4:15 AM

How good is partially grain fed pastured meat?

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56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on November 24, 2013
at 01:13 AM

Well, practically all pastured chicken and pork are also grain fed. I will discuss only these. If you want fully grass fed, ruminants and rabbits are your ticket. Although pigs eat acorns in large amounts in the wild, and acorns are no different from grains, in fact pigs on average gain more weight faster on grains than on acorns, everything being equal (unlimited access to pasture). That is because acorns have tannins that limit digestion of foods. Likewise something that you would guess would be great to raise a pig, such as olive pomace, will hold them back with its high tannins. Things would be perfect if a farmer could just grow a field of sugar beets then unleash a pack of pigs on it, just add/provide water. Then you would have the best possible pig, because they were meant to eat roots. Here in Michigan, pastured pork farmers are harassed by the DNR who fear the establishment of a wild pig herd, and pastured pork is more and more inside a fence.

Chickens are much more carnivorous, and should not, ideally, ever be fed grains. But they, too, are fairly tolerant animals and can adapt to a diet that includes unlimited greenery and some bugs. Taste-wise, I find very little difference.

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56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on November 24, 2013
at 07:44 PM

In regard to steers, also I do not care if they are grain fed in the winter. I buy in November, and so long as the beast has been on pasture for the last six months, purely grass fed, its meat is chemically indistinguishable from a true grass fed animal. We live in a cold climate and some shortcuts are necessary. Goats will just not make it here in winter without some grains. I had a discussion with a colleague who lives and works in Sinaloa, Mexico, where they have access to great beef and fish, and he despises frozen meat. I understand, but here frozen meat is the best one can get.

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Fc23c944ed0641dc74a57e26f9df4338

on November 24, 2013
at 04:03 PM

Thanks for your response @glib ! The local farmer I buy my pastured meat/eggs from also grows organic grain and soy and feeds it to his animals. http://wettsteinorganicfarm.wordpress.com/

I've only been primal/paleo for a couple of months so I'm hoping this is a step in the right direction for me... His prices are reasonable and the farmer/family delivers to my area very month after the farmers market closes and every week once the market opens again. So its very convenient!

0
A7b6c0fc47c8a39a50d5399d74f2c521

on November 23, 2013
at 07:03 PM

I would either save a bunch of money and buy some CAFO meat, or spend the extra for 100% grass-fed and finished meat. Grain finishing pretty much eliminates the benefits of grass feeding. Maybe the animals are treated more humanely, but on my budget I'm only going to spend the extra if it's healthier too.

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Medium avatar

(238)

on November 23, 2013
at 05:00 AM

Not much of a question is it?

Now that someone edited the question, my answer is that I don't much like it. I've had beef like that and it isn't as tasty as a good GFsteak. I also bought some bulk ground meat which oozed a lot of water in the pan compared to my normal GF ground meat which left me wondering what exactly they are doing to it.

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