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Norman Borlaug - friend or foe

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 18, 2013 at 11:42 PM

His advancements in genetically engineered crops and inorganic farming methods you see were credited with saving over 1 Billion lives from the agony of death by starvation.

Friend or foe?

47521a411c6b3f75e09c10b5674fddd6

(34)

on February 20, 2013
at 03:15 AM

"In the 1950s, scientists began cross-breeding wheat to make hardier, shorter and better-growing plants. It was the basis of the Green Revolution that boosted wheat harvests worldwide. Norman Borlaug, the U.S. plant scientist behind many of the innovations, won the Nobel Peace Prize for his work. But the gluten in wheat may have somehow become even more troublesome for many people, Murray said. That also may have contributed to what is now called "gluten sensitivity."" VS. "Norman Borlaug, the man who saved more human lives than anyone else in history." I would go with savior.

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2 Answers

1
Medium avatar

(10611)

on March 05, 2013
at 04:22 AM

The answer is friend, but it's like answering the lawyer's question "Have you stopped beating your wife?" For that I'll downvote you and vote to close this as spam.

Personally, eating Dr. Kellogg's wheat flakes resulted in my obesity and Type 2 diabetes. Wheat has not been my friend. Wheat may save people who are starving, but it is also contributing heavily to the obesity epidemic. To someone who's starving it's a life preserver, but once you've escaped from drowning you don't need it anymore. You can move on to more nutritious foods such as meat.

If you were Dr. Borlaug himself I would thank you for your contribution to starving people. But you're not. Posting this stinky bait demeans his work.

0
D7cc4049bef85d1979efbd853dc07c8e

(4029)

on February 19, 2013
at 02:25 AM

Friend or foe to whom? What do you think?

47521a411c6b3f75e09c10b5674fddd6

(34)

on February 20, 2013
at 03:15 AM

"In the 1950s, scientists began cross-breeding wheat to make hardier, shorter and better-growing plants. It was the basis of the Green Revolution that boosted wheat harvests worldwide. Norman Borlaug, the U.S. plant scientist behind many of the innovations, won the Nobel Peace Prize for his work. But the gluten in wheat may have somehow become even more troublesome for many people, Murray said. That also may have contributed to what is now called "gluten sensitivity."" VS. "Norman Borlaug, the man who saved more human lives than anyone else in history." I would go with savior.

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