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Is there anything that can be done about frankenfoods? (link included)

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 16, 2012 at 1:59 PM

A friend of mine posted this to her facebook a bit ago http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/13/business/growers-fret-over-a-new-apple-that-wont-turn-brown.html and quite frankly, it's got me worried. You can check which food is organic by making sure the label starts with 9, but there's no requirements about labeling genetically modified food. I can't always afford to shop at Whole Foods or similar stores, but now I'm worried that the generic bag of green apples I pick up for my kids to eat might be genetically modified.

Is there anything I can do to make sure my family and I are eating real -natural- food and not something that's been tampered with in a lab, outside of buying organic or growing my own?

Is there something we as a community can to do stop this kind of tampering?

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on July 17, 2012
at 11:36 AM

Understood, but even selective breeding has changed what we call "food". Over the years farmers have chosen to selectively breed the crops that have a the highest sugar content while having lower nutritional value (lower nutritional value crops need fewer nutrients from the soil). This has not been done maliciously, however the result is that apples today are much higher in sugar and lower in vitamins then they were 10,000 years ago.

449e19bbd371a87b653b9b8b56736005

(1567)

on July 17, 2012
at 01:57 AM

Yes, I'm not talking about careful selective breeding, I'm talking about stuff done in a lab.

4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on July 16, 2012
at 05:48 PM

There is a large difference between "genetically modified" through transgenic alterations (i.e. genes from other species), and selective breeding for specific traits.

E12d01c41ed41315112c753c752bd7e2

(50)

on July 16, 2012
at 03:20 PM

That's why you may want to consider the distinction between natural breeding vs. what is only possible with genetic engineering.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on July 16, 2012
at 02:36 PM

True, that's one of my problems with the argument, "Well if our ancestors ate it, it should be good for us to eat it." -- The truth is, nothing that was eaten in paleo times exists today in the same form (http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/variation/corn/).

C45d7e96acd83d3a6f58193dbc140e86

on July 16, 2012
at 02:17 PM

And much of what is at farmers markets are GMO also, just depends on when the modification occurred. Every crop we eat has been genetically altered by selective breeding over the years.

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3 Answers

best answer

1
1133603ea602c6824da56e8b596c9754

on July 16, 2012
at 02:51 PM

Is it possible for you to get organic apples? They are part of the dirty dozen list. Otherwise, I believe GMO fruits and/or veggies will have a number that begins with 8 instead of 4 for regularly produced and 9 for organics.

2
7caec21ad66b572d9afcb1e24f7297aa

on July 16, 2012
at 02:47 PM

The only real solution I see is government-mandated labeling of ALL GMO foods and food ingredients.

I'm not a fan of gov't mandates, but in this case, it seems entirely appropriate.

2
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on July 16, 2012
at 02:03 PM

Famers markets, and CSA are good. Prices, especially for produce in season are typically less than the general grocery stores. And you can usually take a day trip out to the farm to ensure your food is growing naturally.

Or you can go pick your own -- http://www.pickyourown.org/

Great weekend day trip for the kids, and they get to see where real food comes from.

E12d01c41ed41315112c753c752bd7e2

(50)

on July 16, 2012
at 03:20 PM

That's why you may want to consider the distinction between natural breeding vs. what is only possible with genetic engineering.

C45d7e96acd83d3a6f58193dbc140e86

on July 16, 2012
at 02:17 PM

And much of what is at farmers markets are GMO also, just depends on when the modification occurred. Every crop we eat has been genetically altered by selective breeding over the years.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on July 16, 2012
at 02:36 PM

True, that's one of my problems with the argument, "Well if our ancestors ate it, it should be good for us to eat it." -- The truth is, nothing that was eaten in paleo times exists today in the same form (http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/variation/corn/).

4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on July 16, 2012
at 05:48 PM

There is a large difference between "genetically modified" through transgenic alterations (i.e. genes from other species), and selective breeding for specific traits.

449e19bbd371a87b653b9b8b56736005

(1567)

on July 17, 2012
at 01:57 AM

Yes, I'm not talking about careful selective breeding, I'm talking about stuff done in a lab.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on July 17, 2012
at 11:36 AM

Understood, but even selective breeding has changed what we call "food". Over the years farmers have chosen to selectively breed the crops that have a the highest sugar content while having lower nutritional value (lower nutritional value crops need fewer nutrients from the soil). This has not been done maliciously, however the result is that apples today are much higher in sugar and lower in vitamins then they were 10,000 years ago.

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