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Are strawberries supposed to look like this in nature?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 19, 2013 at 2:15 AM

I usually get organic strawberries, but I wasn't at the health food store so I just picked up some regular old strawberries and I found this:

http://i46.tinypic.com/xkmz55.jpg

http://i45.tinypic.com/24nfy42.jpg

3720f5eb63757f8cdbf393ac7530c1c3

(259)

on March 21, 2013
at 10:27 PM

Mmm wild strawberries used to grow near my house where I grew up and yes they are awesome :) Wild blueberries are fantastic too and really small...

2006ccb2b60f9cc5ba5e8eff8a7abc46

(1533)

on March 20, 2013
at 03:12 PM

I know blueballoon, that is why I was specifically damning those plant breeders in labs, who are detached from the field. I work in the field each season, I know the benefit of hybrids see first hand the strength of good genetics, but I also know there are so many more factors, that's why I hate specialization like that(I live and farm in an industrial ag mecca here in the wheat belly of the US, with two AG colleges with huge plant genetics emphasis, im a little bitter)

34b560c8b9ce660d7839fb7e29d7be89

on March 20, 2013
at 01:41 AM

Cabbage, kale, broccoli, kohlrabi, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts would all look a lot like wild mustard without artificial selection by humans.

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on March 19, 2013
at 11:58 PM

GMOs =/= hybrids. My great grandfather bred flowers (hybrids). Nearly everything you eat is a hybrid. That includes cow breeds, blueberries, apples, kale... Hybrids aren't bad. There are plenty of sustainable hybrids of plants and animals that have been around for a very long time. And no, not all plant and animal breeders work in laboratories. Just saying.

2006ccb2b60f9cc5ba5e8eff8a7abc46

(1533)

on March 19, 2013
at 11:42 PM

matt I am sure your comment is sarcastic but seriously, DAMN THEM EVIL PLANT BREEDERS who work in labs and are so specialized in what they are doing they don't understand that nature is all about relationships, so while they may "know" how to choose the "Best" genetics, they don't realize that its impossible to comprehend the 1000s of variables that go into successful fruiting. working with nature, from soil microbe up and creating viable, resilient and self sustaining systems is the way to go........damn them.

8634d4988ced45a68e2a79e69cc01835

(1617)

on March 19, 2013
at 03:24 PM

Sure! Most fruit in supermarkets is the 'pretty fruit' (and veggies), and the 'ugly' ones go to juice or soups/whatever. So, we are used to very large, uniform produce. I've grown strawberries with little points like that in a ring, that looked like a crown! It being organic or not doesn't matter here.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on March 19, 2013
at 12:23 PM

Damn those evil plant breeders!

2006ccb2b60f9cc5ba5e8eff8a7abc46

(1533)

on March 19, 2013
at 04:13 AM

yes, certain varieties of organic strawberries have been bread by selection and time to grow that large and are often kind of deformed, but generally they are just larger, bright red good ol strawberries. the problem with regular strawberries is not only can they be breed in a lab with some weird non plant genetics, they are generally monocropped in soil that is heavily fertilized, lots of pesticide is necessary in this type of environment, none of which is good for you or the environment.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on March 19, 2013
at 04:02 AM

Wild blueberries and blackberries are not much smaller actually.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on March 19, 2013
at 02:56 AM

Re-read your title.

3327924660b1e2f8f8fc4ca27fedf2b2

(2919)

on March 19, 2013
at 02:36 AM

If I knew where to find wild strawberries around here, I'd obviously be consuming them. But how about we limit the scope of this topic to strawberries-purchased-in-stores-and-farmers-markets?

  • 3327924660b1e2f8f8fc4ca27fedf2b2

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5 Answers

13
Medium avatar

on March 19, 2013
at 02:25 AM

Nah, brah, they look like this:

are-strawberries-supposed-to-look-like-this-in-nature?

...and they taste amazing

3327924660b1e2f8f8fc4ca27fedf2b2

(2919)

on March 19, 2013
at 02:36 AM

If I knew where to find wild strawberries around here, I'd obviously be consuming them. But how about we limit the scope of this topic to strawberries-purchased-in-stores-and-farmers-markets?

Medium avatar

(39821)

on March 19, 2013
at 02:56 AM

Re-read your title.

3720f5eb63757f8cdbf393ac7530c1c3

(259)

on March 21, 2013
at 10:27 PM

Mmm wild strawberries used to grow near my house where I grew up and yes they are awesome :) Wild blueberries are fantastic too and really small...

2
9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on March 19, 2013
at 11:37 PM

If you watch any movies from the 1970's or 1980's, look closely at the food, and you'll notice that almost everything is smaller -- berries, eggs, apples, even loaves of bread. It is no joke that not only have portion sizes gotten a lot bigger but the foods themselves have gotten bigger, and blander.

Look at the people too and you'll notice that they aren't fat. I watched Jaws recently (made in 1975) and there were a bunch of beach scenes full of people (who were random people asked to be extras) and none of them are fat. Maybe 1 or 2 people who stood out as obviously overweight, but everyone else was thin and fit by today's standards. And these were just random people, not actors. It's pretty sad.

1
F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on March 19, 2013
at 04:48 AM

Some of them are purposefully bred to be so large. But so are apples, oranges and almost everything we grow. Cows, pigs and chickens are also bred with some specific purpose in mind - more milk, more meat, more bacon, more eggs.

Plus they probably use some fertilizer, they have added it to the soil. Hope it is a natural one.

So eat and enjoy. As long as they taste natural.

1
F291857fa12a0291688ea994343156dc

(720)

on March 19, 2013
at 04:06 AM

Does "regular" hybridization warrant being painted with the GMO brush?

I'll admit many (most?) commercially grown strawberry varieties leave a lot to be desired. Unfortunately optimizing for certain commercially useful characteristics wind up sacrificing others. :(

http://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/ucstrawberry/

1
3b031bce7c181c10452ee202e2b54dc6

on March 19, 2013
at 02:53 AM

yeah normally I dont think its normal. In fact all strawberries are monstrously huge to me these days.

Then the frankeberries like yours remind me of http://www.messybeast.com/freak-face.htm

I wonder what size blueberries and blackberries were before.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on March 19, 2013
at 12:23 PM

Damn those evil plant breeders!

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on March 19, 2013
at 04:02 AM

Wild blueberries and blackberries are not much smaller actually.

34b560c8b9ce660d7839fb7e29d7be89

on March 20, 2013
at 01:41 AM

Cabbage, kale, broccoli, kohlrabi, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts would all look a lot like wild mustard without artificial selection by humans.

2006ccb2b60f9cc5ba5e8eff8a7abc46

(1533)

on March 19, 2013
at 11:42 PM

matt I am sure your comment is sarcastic but seriously, DAMN THEM EVIL PLANT BREEDERS who work in labs and are so specialized in what they are doing they don't understand that nature is all about relationships, so while they may "know" how to choose the "Best" genetics, they don't realize that its impossible to comprehend the 1000s of variables that go into successful fruiting. working with nature, from soil microbe up and creating viable, resilient and self sustaining systems is the way to go........damn them.

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on March 19, 2013
at 11:58 PM

GMOs =/= hybrids. My great grandfather bred flowers (hybrids). Nearly everything you eat is a hybrid. That includes cow breeds, blueberries, apples, kale... Hybrids aren't bad. There are plenty of sustainable hybrids of plants and animals that have been around for a very long time. And no, not all plant and animal breeders work in laboratories. Just saying.

2006ccb2b60f9cc5ba5e8eff8a7abc46

(1533)

on March 20, 2013
at 03:12 PM

I know blueballoon, that is why I was specifically damning those plant breeders in labs, who are detached from the field. I work in the field each season, I know the benefit of hybrids see first hand the strength of good genetics, but I also know there are so many more factors, that's why I hate specialization like that(I live and farm in an industrial ag mecca here in the wheat belly of the US, with two AG colleges with huge plant genetics emphasis, im a little bitter)

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