6

votes

does the glycemic index matter?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 19, 2011 at 1:06 PM

Hi all. I am wondering if the glycemic index matters. Having encountered lots of recommendations from various sources to consume potatoes('high g.i')I am curious about whether this would be a good practice. Currently I am following a VLC diet and was contemplating the incorporation of carbs from tuber/root sources. Does anyone know about the glycemic index and whether to believe the hype?

698db94d83dee10d6ada8cc0128d45fc

(1048)

on May 03, 2011
at 03:56 PM

My mistake on the wording, should have said resistance!

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on April 20, 2011
at 01:02 PM

I did not know that - although the amounts for sweet potatoes are less than most fruit gram for gram. White potatoes only have a little bit... ("It's only got a little Spam in it.")

88905cfc5bb098ad3830671a1af373a8

(803)

on April 20, 2011
at 09:04 AM

fructose causes insulin *resistance*; see Gary Taubes' article "Is Sugar Toxic?" in the NYTimes Magazine from this past weekend.

88905cfc5bb098ad3830671a1af373a8

(803)

on April 20, 2011
at 09:02 AM

tubers contain fructose also. see this post: http://paleohacks.com/questions/23447/fructose-beets-sweet-potatoes#axzz1JvjTvRAQ

Medium avatar

(39821)

on April 20, 2011
at 03:21 AM

It doesn't cause acute insulin secretion, but it does cause chronic insulin resistance.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 19, 2011
at 07:42 PM

Will do thanks.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 19, 2011
at 07:42 PM

thats correct, it stimulates glycation especially when combine with protein.

9fb6900af6e722fc80ab46782fa94e2c

on April 19, 2011
at 06:25 PM

Fructose does not stimulate insulin secretion.

2f54dbe892ec89b12d1db686568e885a

(919)

on April 19, 2011
at 04:44 PM

Dr. Hay recommends 3 to 4 hours between starch and protein meals

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on April 19, 2011
at 04:00 PM

I have never read that fructose prompts insulin production. Do you have a reference for that? Is it the sweetness of it or the fact that it increases insulin resistance, therefore requiring more insulin (but not a direct stimulation)?

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on April 19, 2011
at 03:57 PM

Mari, spreading it out means insulin in the system for a longer period of time at lower levels. I would assume the amounts would be similar. I don't know if that's better or worse, but it would limit how much ketosis/fat burning time you have. I would definitely advise against minispiking it all day long ala SAD/snacking. PersonMan - starchy tubers convert to all glucose (not counting fiber, protein and other stuff). This is why we tend to prefer them over glucose/fructose combos. If you don't trust regular potatoes, eat yams/sweet potatoes. I don't know any big difference between red & white.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 19, 2011
at 03:31 PM

How much of an interval would I have to have between the consumption of starch post workout(say 50 grams carbs) and the P/F meal? I was thinking 30 minutes would be fine under the above conditions but...

2f54dbe892ec89b12d1db686568e885a

(919)

on April 19, 2011
at 03:29 PM

Fat and starches - very good

2f54dbe892ec89b12d1db686568e885a

(919)

on April 19, 2011
at 03:28 PM

if you follow the advice of Dr. William Hay, you would not combine protein with starches

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on April 19, 2011
at 03:26 PM

It is better to eat potatoes than analyse them.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 19, 2011
at 03:15 PM

"its the carb (glucose) content of food that matters in terms of insulin response." I have been hearing about ratios re: sugars in foods being most relevant where health optimization is concerned. Glucose proportionately correlated with minimizing problems when consuming carbs(higher ratio of glucose to other sugars=better?). Red potatoes or white?. I've had my hear filled with propaghanda re: g.i so that I can't associate white potatoes with anything desirable. For more Paleo hacks: http://paleohacks.com/questions/33964/does-the-glycemic-index-matter#ixzz1JyxRQTIA

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 19, 2011
at 03:11 PM

The norm then is <50% carbs=no g.i relevance? I have been thinking of placing them in the diet thus: Morning: 'anaerobic'(oxygen independant) weight-training=30min.-1hr 'aerobic' walking=35 min. immediately after: red potato with sea salt, vitamin C tab, 2 x Vit D3 tabs[perhaps white would be best(I've been led to believe red is better owing to the 'g.i'rhetoric)] : amount to be determined. 30 minutes later: 6 eggs, 50 grams butter, garlic, parseley. Aside from the apparent irrelevance of the G.I, is it wise to combine starchy carbs and protein/fat(I have been told PH argues against it).

2f54dbe892ec89b12d1db686568e885a

(919)

on April 19, 2011
at 01:48 PM

as you consume less than 50% of your calories from carbohydrates, the glycemic index has no relevance to you. Have a spud or 2.

Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7304)

on April 19, 2011
at 01:32 PM

It might be better to spread them out over the course of the day though. If I have half my potatoes for breakfast and half for dinner, that would be less insulin than all together. Also, I'm not convinced insulin is all that problematic when sporadically raised. Chronically elevated insulin is a different story entirely.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on April 19, 2011
at 01:19 PM

Basically, what I said. But with fewer words!

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5 Answers

1
7767e05a8c4504f6be03f13ee40815cd

(1299)

on April 19, 2011
at 05:44 PM

Just throwing in Stephan Guyenet's article on the glycemic index. He has more on this - his site is excellent, poke around a bit!

http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2009/03/its-time-to-let-go-of-glycemic-index.html

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 19, 2011
at 07:42 PM

Will do thanks.

1
A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on April 19, 2011
at 01:18 PM

Potatoes are fine, if you don't need to lose a lot of weight and you are not diabetic. Athletes and those who are lean or close to lean seem to do better on more carbs. The Glycemic Index (GI) has been mostly discredited due to the fact that mixed foods totally change the absorption rate. Really, its the carb (glucose) content of food that matters in terms of insulin response.

Most paleos that do tubers, either eat them post work out (PWO) to replenish glycogen or in the afternoon/evening for the increased serotonin response (helps with sleep).

I wouldn't recommend eating them more than once per day, so that insulin spikes are limited. A little insulin PWO, might be a good thing...

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on April 20, 2011
at 01:02 PM

I did not know that - although the amounts for sweet potatoes are less than most fruit gram for gram. White potatoes only have a little bit... ("It's only got a little Spam in it.")

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 19, 2011
at 03:15 PM

"its the carb (glucose) content of food that matters in terms of insulin response." I have been hearing about ratios re: sugars in foods being most relevant where health optimization is concerned. Glucose proportionately correlated with minimizing problems when consuming carbs(higher ratio of glucose to other sugars=better?). Red potatoes or white?. I've had my hear filled with propaghanda re: g.i so that I can't associate white potatoes with anything desirable. For more Paleo hacks: http://paleohacks.com/questions/33964/does-the-glycemic-index-matter#ixzz1JyxRQTIA

88905cfc5bb098ad3830671a1af373a8

(803)

on April 20, 2011
at 09:02 AM

tubers contain fructose also. see this post: http://paleohacks.com/questions/23447/fructose-beets-sweet-potatoes#axzz1JvjTvRAQ

Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7304)

on April 19, 2011
at 01:32 PM

It might be better to spread them out over the course of the day though. If I have half my potatoes for breakfast and half for dinner, that would be less insulin than all together. Also, I'm not convinced insulin is all that problematic when sporadically raised. Chronically elevated insulin is a different story entirely.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on April 19, 2011
at 03:26 PM

It is better to eat potatoes than analyse them.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on April 19, 2011
at 03:57 PM

Mari, spreading it out means insulin in the system for a longer period of time at lower levels. I would assume the amounts would be similar. I don't know if that's better or worse, but it would limit how much ketosis/fat burning time you have. I would definitely advise against minispiking it all day long ala SAD/snacking. PersonMan - starchy tubers convert to all glucose (not counting fiber, protein and other stuff). This is why we tend to prefer them over glucose/fructose combos. If you don't trust regular potatoes, eat yams/sweet potatoes. I don't know any big difference between red & white.

1
9aa2a816c61170cc0183a68be0386ba5

on April 19, 2011
at 01:14 PM

As far as I've read, if you're trying to lose weight, items like potatoes and other starchy high GI items are best consumed immediately following an anaerobic workout (such as weight training).

If you're happy with your weight / phisique, then you can consume them at any point, just not too many.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on April 19, 2011
at 01:19 PM

Basically, what I said. But with fewer words!

0
6f2c00fcbf48c69f0ea212239b3e1178

on April 20, 2011
at 02:56 AM

No. Fuck the glysemen index.

-2
698db94d83dee10d6ada8cc0128d45fc

(1048)

on April 19, 2011
at 03:19 PM

another note re the GI is that it that foods containing fructose i.e. fruit are underscored due to the fact that fructose is not handled the same was sucrose is (it has little to no effect on actual blood sugar elevation) but would be handled by the liver and still prompt insulin production.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on April 20, 2011
at 03:21 AM

It doesn't cause acute insulin secretion, but it does cause chronic insulin resistance.

88905cfc5bb098ad3830671a1af373a8

(803)

on April 20, 2011
at 09:04 AM

fructose causes insulin *resistance*; see Gary Taubes' article "Is Sugar Toxic?" in the NYTimes Magazine from this past weekend.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on April 19, 2011
at 04:00 PM

I have never read that fructose prompts insulin production. Do you have a reference for that? Is it the sweetness of it or the fact that it increases insulin resistance, therefore requiring more insulin (but not a direct stimulation)?

9fb6900af6e722fc80ab46782fa94e2c

on April 19, 2011
at 06:25 PM

Fructose does not stimulate insulin secretion.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 19, 2011
at 07:42 PM

thats correct, it stimulates glycation especially when combine with protein.

698db94d83dee10d6ada8cc0128d45fc

(1048)

on May 03, 2011
at 03:56 PM

My mistake on the wording, should have said resistance!

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