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votes

Soy Sauce vs Wheat Sauce... or whatever coconut amino madness.

Commented on November 03, 2013
Created November 01, 2013 at 5:49 PM

There are a few threads regarding soy sauce, I know...

Apparently a lot of celiac Japanese enjoy soy sauce (with wheat) without issue. Then a lot of Americans claim it makes them terribly ill.

I'm probably not celiac. I try to keep wheat (and soy) out of my diet because I feel better that way. Since I have no immediate reaction to it, it's hard to tell whether the soy sauce is messing with my body. I tend to DRENCH my sashimi in soy sauce and wasabi. I also like to add quite a bit to stir fry. So regardless of wheat/soy content, I'm currently using it.

What's your take on soy (or wheat) sauce? Does the fermentation render it completely safe or despite the fact that it is - for all intensive purposes - gluten free, should we avoid it? I'm not asking whether I'll get sick. I'm hoping some of you more technical paleohackers will come back with something compelling one way or the other so I can be more decisive.

And try not to give me that "if you tolerate it" crap. That makes a lot of sense for other things (like milk) but hey, I tolerate peanuts just fine and I don't eat those.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on November 03, 2013
at 08:57 PM

I agree 100%. Like I said in my response. I am gluten sensitive, but I still consume soy sauce.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on November 03, 2013
at 12:52 PM

Most beers are effectively-gluten free, only the most sensitive celiacs react to them. Soy sauce made with wheat also is effectively-gluten free. Testing on both puts them under 20 ppb for gluten - which regulations allow it to be labeled gluten-free.

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on November 03, 2013
at 08:47 AM

It looks like a slice of white bread is about 3.5g of gluten, with a tsp. of gluten-free soy sauce at a little under 0.00005g max. While it would be nice if that was under 0.00002g, I think it should be pretty safe. I think the most sensitive reaction in an article (Catassi) is around 0.01g total gluten in a day.

200tsp of soy sauce (enough to cause a reaction) would be over 62 grams of sodium. A lethal dose.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on November 03, 2013
at 07:41 AM

yeah that's the same stuff I use for the most part. 20 ppm is considered "gluten free" but most of the celiac groups are requesting that it is updated to 5 or 3. Practically for those of us without celiacs, 20 ppm is probably fine.

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on November 02, 2013
at 06:56 PM

Interesting! Luckily, my stomach seems to handle gluten just fine. (Lactose surprisingly seems to be giving me more of an issue lately.) I use this stuff.

"Each batch of our certified gluten free products is tested for the presence of gluten. Although the FDA has not finalized a standard for gluten free labeling, all of San-J's gluten-free products meet the strict standards of the GFCO, which sets the limit at less than 10 parts per million gluten (ppm)."

Medium avatar

on November 02, 2013
at 03:27 PM

The amount of salt makes it a food we shouldn't eat at all, it simply provides no benefit. You should only consume sodium from whole plant sources, not refined powder, or things like soy sauce...

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on November 02, 2013
at 11:37 AM

This is the same as I do. But FYI, none of the tamari I have found are gluten free. Even the ones marketed as gluten free usually have some cross-contaimination...

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3 Answers

0
Medium avatar

(238)

on November 01, 2013
at 09:05 PM

Fish sauce is my answer to all things soy sauce. It makes a strong statement on your food and you only need a small dose instead of a drenching. Fermenting certainly changes things but that science is above my knowledge.

0
Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on November 01, 2013
at 08:33 PM

My Japanese family puts soy sauce on just about everything. Since going paleo, I've got them to switch to the wheat-free organic version (Tamari) and they like it better. Since we like the taste better and it has the organic label, I see no reason to switch back to the standard wheat one, regardless of whether I have a sensitivity to it or not.

I've tried to like coconut aminos, but, it's just not as good. I use it occasionally with hawaiian type stuff.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on November 02, 2013
at 11:37 AM

This is the same as I do. But FYI, none of the tamari I have found are gluten free. Even the ones marketed as gluten free usually have some cross-contaimination...

0
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on November 01, 2013
at 07:04 PM

I am definitely gluten sensitive. I tried adding some grains back to my diet and I had a reaction (allergy) within a week of reintroduction. Took over two weeks of removal to get back to normal. I have done this twice, so I am pretty sure it wasn't just a coincidence.

That being said, I consume beer (only a couple (or more) per week), wine (a couple per week), and soy sauce (maybe a tblsp or two per week) with zero reactions. I do not know if that's because of the fermentation or just that I stay below the threshold where I react.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on November 03, 2013
at 12:52 PM

Most beers are effectively-gluten free, only the most sensitive celiacs react to them. Soy sauce made with wheat also is effectively-gluten free. Testing on both puts them under 20 ppb for gluten - which regulations allow it to be labeled gluten-free.

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