1

votes

Sources to papers that back up the time delayed gluten response

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created April 21, 2011 at 7:35 AM

I'm gluten sensitive, in that if I go for 1 week or more without gluten and then have for example pancakes, I get brain-fog and feel 'down' the next day. This feeling continues for another day, or two at the very most.

The response is delayed with about 12 hours or more; if I eat gluten at night, I feel it the next day after lunch or even later. However, I'm having a hard time getting people to believe me, because they say the time-delay is too long for an allergic reaction.

Does anyone have any clues as to the enzymatic reactions that could be causing this, and in particular, any explanation to the delay effect? I'm wondering because it shouldn't take more than 6 hours at most before the first batch gluten has passed my stomach.

So what I'm looking for is:

1) Sources to papers that provide clues or guesses about my brain's reaction to gluten that makes me feel down the next day

2) Sources to other kinds of time-delayed reactions to food that could be comparable to the gluten response (starts after minimum 12 hours and continues for another 36)

Thank you.

B3403a96ae5dc7a092bcda4cfaa21b8e

on April 27, 2011
at 03:44 PM

Thanks, this answers my question!

E7be2ce38158357f5dacae07b43d1b29

on April 23, 2011
at 12:36 AM

Science is a long way from knowing what causes problems like these. Sometimes a genetic link can be found, but if you stop and think that we're each exposed to hundreds of synthetic chemicals a day, all of which are in our bodies, finding the needle in that kind of haystack isn't very easy!

531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

(8878)

on April 21, 2011
at 01:01 PM

Awesome answer. And thanks for the links.

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6 Answers

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4
17c4ac2c3f75c9e37d196ea878ea94b5

(130)

on April 21, 2011
at 09:23 AM

Hi! First off, I am sorry that you have had such a hard time with Gluten!!

Secondly, have you been tested for celiac disease? Your username appears to be Norwegian... so if you are indeed from Scandinavia, I know that it is cheap and easy to order a celiac test at any pharmacy... without even consulting your doctor. I would definitely recommend that based on your symptoms. (if i was wrong about your username, you can easily order an over the counter celiac test in most western countries).

Thirdly. Yes, there is scientific evidence of a delayed reaction with gluten. Though it isnt an "allergy" in the traditional sense. A wheat allergy does react quickly, but a gluten intolerance can have a delay. If the delay is a result of a type II immunological hypersensitivity (antibody mediated) reaction, then it takes 1-3 days for antibody to be formed in response to the antigen (gluten/gliadin). However, if there is repeat exposure to gluten, I believe the delay time can be shorter than a day because lymphocytes are already ready on-site due to constant inflammation... so 12 hours seems plausible.

Additionally, according to research cited by Scientific American in their 2009 article on gluten, gut bacteria plays a key role in gluten sensitivity. So, even if you did NOT have celiac disease, you could have an idiopathic form of gluten intolerance that causes your fogginess... and might very well be mediated by gut flora, decrease in nutrient absorption, leaky gut, etc.

//Another Consideration// Have you ever only eaten gluten after a week of break from it? Or do you always eat it with other things such as sugar? I was just curious if you have similar reactions to sugars or fruits? (Because fructose in things such as apples can cause fogginess in some people... and wheat has fructan which is a very similar molecule that can cause similar reactions in people with fructose intolerance.

//Back to Gluten...Some symptoms listed from the SciAm article// "It is also now clear that CD often manifests in a previously unappreciated spectrum of symptoms driven by local disruptions of nutri- ent absorption from the intestine. Disruption of iron absorption, for example, can cause anemia, and poor folate uptake can lead to a variety of neurological problems. By robbing the body of particular nutrients, CD can thus produce such symptoms as osteoporosis, joint pain, chronic fatigue, short stature, skin lesions, epilepsy, de- mentia, schizophrenia and seizure. Because CD often presents in an atypical fashion, many cases still go undiagnosed." & "Othersignsthatmayoccurin adults are anemia, arthritis, bone loss, depression, fatigue, infertility, joint pain, seizures, and numbness in the hands and feet."
MANY adults with CD never have gut problems (bloating, gas, diarrhea). MANY never even have symptoms!

//Wiki Links// Here are some links you can look at, the wiki sites link to NUMEROUS research articles: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gluten_sensitivity#Immunochemistry_of_glutens http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coeliac_disease

//SciAm// http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=celiac-disease-insights (I highly recommend that you ask your library about this Celiac article. It explains the science behind gluten intolerance in a very up-to-date and specific manner. August 2009, Scientific American "Surprises from Celiac Disease")

//SciAm cited this research// Mechanisms of Disease: The Role of Intestinal Barrier Function in the Pathogenesis of Gastroin- testinal Autoimmune Diseases. Alessio Fasano and Terez Shea- Donohue in Nature Clinical Practice Gastroenterology & Hepatology, Vol. 2, No. 9, pages 416???422; September 2005. Diagnosis and Treatment of Celiac Disease. L. M. Sollid and K.E.A. Lun- din in Mucosal Immunology, Vol. 2, No. 1, pages 3???7; January 2009.

531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

(8878)

on April 21, 2011
at 01:01 PM

Awesome answer. And thanks for the links.

B3403a96ae5dc7a092bcda4cfaa21b8e

on April 27, 2011
at 03:44 PM

Thanks, this answers my question!

0
9c66ff832f8e09607a65620f305a4f04

on April 29, 2013
at 04:39 PM

Aha!

This explains my feeling foggy, nauseated and generally rotten today. I suspected as much, Googled to see if I was right, and found this thread.

Got glutenized (voluntarily-sheesh) on Saturday evening. No reaction until this morning (Monday). I'm not technically a celiac sufferer, but am likely sensitive in some way, especially after 4 months clean and paleo.

Thanks all for sharing your experiences!

0
8a5e7e976ec8a2c71240ded08dab718b

on November 26, 2012
at 10:38 PM

I also wanted to add that I have celiac disease and my reaction is almost always 36-48 hours after I have (accidently) eaten gluten. This is unfortunate as this makes it harder to work out what the cause was. I typically do not have many digestive symptoms, instead I'll feel weak & shaky, get headaches, feel nauseous and generally unwell and this will last for anything from 1-4 days depending on how badly I've been "glutenized"

Thanks to Kelly above for talking about the fact that it takes 1-3 days for the antibody to form. That really makes sense to me, as I always wondered why it tool so long for the reaction to happen.

0
E7be2ce38158357f5dacae07b43d1b29

on April 23, 2011
at 12:30 AM

Here is a massive repository about all kinds of things in foods with links to medical research, and this page is the search link about gluten: http://www.greenmedinfo.com/search/node/gluten

My personal guess about your reaction is that it takes time for it to enter your bloodstream before it can affect your brain, or it's causing some problem to something else in your endocrine system, which means after initial exposure, your glands may produce too much or too little of something, and nothing like that would be immediate. There are also studies (some of which archived at the link above) which show damage to the myelin sheath in nerve endings (which I don't understand well - I'm not a biologist) but it seems that wouldn't be an immediate effect either. Probably lots of other possibilities.

0
4914c7f2792e9935713f4125a04b261f

on April 22, 2011
at 04:50 PM

What is the cause of this wheat intolerance? Is this the same with diseases or diarrhea? I might encountered this intolerance but I dont know the cause. Any symptoms? Thanks!

E7be2ce38158357f5dacae07b43d1b29

on April 23, 2011
at 12:36 AM

Science is a long way from knowing what causes problems like these. Sometimes a genetic link can be found, but if you stop and think that we're each exposed to hundreds of synthetic chemicals a day, all of which are in our bodies, finding the needle in that kind of haystack isn't very easy!

0
1d952d225819b0229e93160a90bf9bf8

on April 21, 2011
at 12:56 PM

The numbness in my hands and feet scared the bejesus out of me.Neurological issues related to CD still aren't widely spoken about.Thought I had MS when it was cross contamination in my house.Still can tell when my fiancée has tried to sneak something in while I'm at work..hands will be numb the next day. As far as delayed reaction,yes, it's a fact.I've eaten some cross contaminated holiday candy on a Friday,been fine until Sunday morning,when I began to get very tired and nauseous.Reaction can also vary by the amount of gluten you ingest, and how long it's been since you've had any.I went a year clean, and then was put on a gluten challenge by the doctor.A cupcake that just gave me a little fogginess and stomach ache before made me vomit blood at that point.

http://www.celiac.com/search?cx=partner-pub-2870123369516656:e1y9um-mqfh&cof=FORID:11&ie=ISO-8859-1&q=delayed+reaction&sa=Search&siteurl=www.celiac.com/ A mountain of real life experiences with delayed reaction can be found here.

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