3

votes

So what's the deal with those Gluten-Free Oats?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 04, 2011 at 7:33 AM

I used to have oats for breakfast, I'm tempted to get back to them. I used to ear regular oats and be satiated for about 4 hours or so, which in my grain-fest-laden days, was really something.

So what about gluten-free oats? They are gluten free... but they're still a cereal?

Who's eating oats with milk? Or oatmeal (cooked)?

6e37f170409bc1b100c880c57508c5fd

on November 06, 2011
at 06:40 PM

The buckwheat/oat bread was supplemented with sourdough starter. It was so dense it could double as a Denver Boot! The taste was good but would only serve as toast, never as sandwhich bread. Alot of work for a mediocre product. No return of neuropathy signs yet... I think I'll just stick to playing around with 2 wk old fermented sourdough bread made from sourdouch starter.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on November 06, 2011
at 04:31 PM

I added some raisins and a little honey, but I'd honestly rather eat steamed basmati rice.

306905a32e76b5c0764a663ea7e88426

(1072)

on November 06, 2011
at 08:42 AM

+1 from an Englishman visiting Scotland next month. :)

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 06, 2011
at 07:16 AM

Ew! Unless you eat them with dates (an old family dessert involved mashed dates rolled in oats) that doesn't sound good at all.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on November 05, 2011
at 04:12 PM

Love it! Please keep us posted on how this turns out.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on November 05, 2011
at 04:11 PM

Another +1. Totally funny.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on November 05, 2011
at 12:00 AM

Good name McMeghann :)

Ccdf3fbcaec76e025ff94d03cc4daf9a

(536)

on November 04, 2011
at 09:29 PM

+1 hilarious. And my family is Scottish :)

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 04, 2011
at 08:06 PM

+1 for creative experimentation! Let us know how it works out.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on November 04, 2011
at 07:45 PM

Apologies to anyone who does understand the whole English/Scottish history, or know that the Scots highlanders used to live on oats and had a reputation for producing big, strong warriors.

C2ad96801ec1e22d2bf62475b6e52751

(1416)

on November 04, 2011
at 04:57 PM

+1 -- Yes it is.

D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on November 04, 2011
at 03:17 PM

I was humored. :)

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 02:24 PM

-1 - thats not funny.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 02:23 PM

Sorry for misinterpretation. I really think omitting nuts from the diet just because IP6 is not good idea given the huge array of other beneficial substances they posses. I completely agree with you about conclusions. I try not to read them a lot.

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on November 04, 2011
at 02:03 PM

@majkinetor - I didn't say I agreed with Lucas' post, just that I thought it was well-documented. ;) The review article you cited is full of references too. SInce I don't have the expertise (or the time) to plow through them, my comment was based on the review article's conclusion, which didn't deny the fact that phytate inhibits mineral absorption (except possibly in soy). I *intuitively* like the idea of the microbiome's role. I'd be interested in reading more on this, if I could only find the time...

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 01:37 PM

Anyway, good catch for HarvestPlus, didn't see that one :D +1

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 01:36 PM

Anyway, good catch for HarvestPlus, didn't see that one :D

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 01:36 PM

Also, I eat my IP6 from nuts and cocoa - I don't mix those with other foods. So IP6 can not block absorption of anything, that I am getting otherwise.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 01:33 PM

@gydle, the second one is review, which contains references. You can't imagine stuff when you are not the one that made the facts. You can imagine explanations. I gave review for references.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on November 04, 2011
at 01:32 PM

the *gluten-free* aspect of the oats you are referring to only refers to their processing facility. Those oats are in a facility where there are absolutely no gluten-containing grains allowed in so the naturally glutenless oat can remain that way. The gluten that may be present in normal store-bought oats is there from cross-contamination in handling and processing.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 01:32 PM

How you could agree with Lucas and not with me?! Lucas concluded: "The dangers of phytic acid have been overestimated"

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 01:30 PM

@gydle: The first one which I removed showed that it blocks Zinc. So I guess it would hurt Nestle. I removed it because I didn't want to cite that one, but review.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on November 04, 2011
at 01:27 PM

I'll try to think up a more serious answer later :)

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on November 04, 2011
at 01:22 PM

What a well-documented post - thanks. And it emphasizes the gut microbiome as a major player in phytate degradation which is super interesting.

7d64d3988de1b0e493aacf37843c5596

(2861)

on November 04, 2011
at 01:06 PM

Lucas Tafur has an interesting post on phytates: http://www.lucastafur.com/2011/10/is-phytate-really-problem.html

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on November 04, 2011
at 12:56 PM

I looked at the study you cite, and I don't agree at all with your interpretation of it. I'm not going to argue it here. But it's worth following my number one rule when looking at scientific studies: follow the funding. The first one you cited (and then removed) was done by nestlé, and the second receives funding from an organization called HarvestPlus. That wouldn't be a grain company, would it?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 12:35 PM

P6 is phytic acid. And according to bunch of studies this effect is not big, if it exists at all. Its also preventable with vitamin C supplementation. http://www.springerlink.com/content/jx62xx0361173786/fulltext.pdf

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 12:33 PM

IP6 is phytic acid. And according to bunch of studies this effect is not big, if it exists at all. http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=879124 http://www.springerlink.com/content/jx62xx0361173786/fulltext.pdf. It also has bunch of positive effects.

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on November 04, 2011
at 12:24 PM

@majkinetor I don't know what IP6 is, but phytic acid does inhibit mineral absorption, as explained on this post over at the Weston Price Foundation. http://www.westonaprice.org/food-features/living-with-phytic-acid I was wrong, though in my previous suggestion - turns out oats don't have enough phytase in them for soaking w/whey to work. If you want to break down the phytic acid you could add some ground buckwheat (which has lots of phytase) and soak it with that.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 12:04 PM

Eveylin is right, however, lots of fiber is probably not good idea too. I used to eat 2-3 tbsp a day for a year of various kinds of fiber to threat my hemorrhoids and reduce weight. Neither happened, hemorrhoids were just a little bit better. Low carb diet fixed it in very short period.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 12:02 PM

*It kept me full for a whole 30min!* The same here....

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 12:01 PM

@gydle - IP6 is not consideration for most people.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 12:00 PM

Evelyn, both me and my wife gained weight when we adopted oat meal for 2 months.

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on November 04, 2011
at 12:00 PM

From what I understand, phytic acid is a consideration. If you soak the steel cut oats in water overnight (1/4 oats to 1c water) with a teaspoonful of yogurt in the pot, this mitigates the phytic acid.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 11:59 AM

I would suggest cannabis for one. There are thousands of studies showing it promote weight gain. Some of the weight loss medications are made from such conclusion. The fastest way to gain weight is to drink lots of sodas. That is not healthy, so you would likely have to make your own juices from apple, orange etc...

D89511137c1849427593b3ef172578cb

(395)

on November 04, 2011
at 11:24 AM

Id' say rice is more empty calories. But I agree there is better stuff. In either case, it's no cheat, far from it. I'm not adding honey or anything to it. I either eat oats + milk or I cook it, which is what you native speakers call oatmeal I guess. But usually when I ate it I just ate a 40-50g serving of oats + half a liter or a liter of milk followed with a banana or apple. That was my breakfast. It would last me for 4 hours or so, which at the time of my gluten diet was outstanding.

D89511137c1849427593b3ef172578cb

(395)

on November 04, 2011
at 11:21 AM

Potatoes aren't cutting it =) I'm eating cassava as it's much more dense but the weight gain is slow (but it is working). If I'm gaining weight (and I'm gaining mostly mostly fat but the hell with it), why not have something I used to like a lot?
Enjoy life, you're not going to be around forever.

24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on November 04, 2011
at 11:05 AM

I've added back steel cut oats to my diet on occasion. No ill effect and they fill me up like crazy. I make mine with a little cream, and almond milk.

24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on November 04, 2011
at 11:04 AM

Soluble fiber should not be underestimated. It feeds your beneficial gut flora which in turn feeds your gut cells with butyrate.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on November 04, 2011
at 11:03 AM

If you wanna gain weight, eat potatoes.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 11:02 AM

That was not part of original question.

D89511137c1849427593b3ef172578cb

(395)

on November 04, 2011
at 10:49 AM

That's exactly what I need right now, to gain weight. I was just wondering if there are long term problems with it besides being a cereal (even though it's gluten free). I've read it has a substance called avenin or something.

B3e7d1ab5aeb329fe24cca1de1a0b09c

(5242)

on November 04, 2011
at 10:28 AM

Fibre smibre....

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 09:49 AM

**Oatmeal is basically empty calories** This is far from truth. It contains number of bioactive phytonutrients - toxic or not - including substantial amount of soluble fiber.

  • D89511137c1849427593b3ef172578cb

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9 Answers

15
0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on November 04, 2011
at 01:26 PM

I'd be cautious about eating oats. This is what you can end up like eating a diet based on oats...

so-what's-the-deal-with-those-gluten-free-oats?

...you might get the urge to pick up a big sword and go to find some English to fight.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 02:24 PM

-1 - thats not funny.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on November 04, 2011
at 01:27 PM

I'll try to think up a more serious answer later :)

C2ad96801ec1e22d2bf62475b6e52751

(1416)

on November 04, 2011
at 04:57 PM

+1 -- Yes it is.

D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on November 04, 2011
at 03:17 PM

I was humored. :)

306905a32e76b5c0764a663ea7e88426

(1072)

on November 06, 2011
at 08:42 AM

+1 from an Englishman visiting Scotland next month. :)

Ccdf3fbcaec76e025ff94d03cc4daf9a

(536)

on November 04, 2011
at 09:29 PM

+1 hilarious. And my family is Scottish :)

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on November 05, 2011
at 12:00 AM

Good name McMeghann :)

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on November 04, 2011
at 07:45 PM

Apologies to anyone who does understand the whole English/Scottish history, or know that the Scots highlanders used to live on oats and had a reputation for producing big, strong warriors.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on November 05, 2011
at 04:11 PM

Another +1. Totally funny.

6
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 09:47 AM

Gluten is only one problematic protein in grains. Oats don't have gluten btw, its cross contamination issue and I doubt contaminated "gluten free oats" provide significant source of gluten. It may be valuable for celiacs but for rest of us, its waste of money IMO, if you eat them at all.

I don't eat them. They tend to promote weight gain IMO.

D89511137c1849427593b3ef172578cb

(395)

on November 04, 2011
at 10:49 AM

That's exactly what I need right now, to gain weight. I was just wondering if there are long term problems with it besides being a cereal (even though it's gluten free). I've read it has a substance called avenin or something.

D89511137c1849427593b3ef172578cb

(395)

on November 04, 2011
at 11:21 AM

Potatoes aren't cutting it =) I'm eating cassava as it's much more dense but the weight gain is slow (but it is working). If I'm gaining weight (and I'm gaining mostly mostly fat but the hell with it), why not have something I used to like a lot?
Enjoy life, you're not going to be around forever.

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on November 04, 2011
at 01:22 PM

What a well-documented post - thanks. And it emphasizes the gut microbiome as a major player in phytate degradation which is super interesting.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 01:37 PM

Anyway, good catch for HarvestPlus, didn't see that one :D +1

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 12:01 PM

@gydle - IP6 is not consideration for most people.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 01:30 PM

@gydle: The first one which I removed showed that it blocks Zinc. So I guess it would hurt Nestle. I removed it because I didn't want to cite that one, but review.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 12:35 PM

P6 is phytic acid. And according to bunch of studies this effect is not big, if it exists at all. Its also preventable with vitamin C supplementation. http://www.springerlink.com/content/jx62xx0361173786/fulltext.pdf

24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on November 04, 2011
at 11:05 AM

I've added back steel cut oats to my diet on occasion. No ill effect and they fill me up like crazy. I make mine with a little cream, and almond milk.

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on November 04, 2011
at 11:03 AM

If you wanna gain weight, eat potatoes.

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on November 04, 2011
at 12:00 PM

From what I understand, phytic acid is a consideration. If you soak the steel cut oats in water overnight (1/4 oats to 1c water) with a teaspoonful of yogurt in the pot, this mitigates the phytic acid.

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on November 04, 2011
at 12:24 PM

@majkinetor I don't know what IP6 is, but phytic acid does inhibit mineral absorption, as explained on this post over at the Weston Price Foundation. http://www.westonaprice.org/food-features/living-with-phytic-acid I was wrong, though in my previous suggestion - turns out oats don't have enough phytase in them for soaking w/whey to work. If you want to break down the phytic acid you could add some ground buckwheat (which has lots of phytase) and soak it with that.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 12:33 PM

IP6 is phytic acid. And according to bunch of studies this effect is not big, if it exists at all. http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=879124 http://www.springerlink.com/content/jx62xx0361173786/fulltext.pdf. It also has bunch of positive effects.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 01:32 PM

How you could agree with Lucas and not with me?! Lucas concluded: "The dangers of phytic acid have been overestimated"

7d64d3988de1b0e493aacf37843c5596

(2861)

on November 04, 2011
at 01:06 PM

Lucas Tafur has an interesting post on phytates: http://www.lucastafur.com/2011/10/is-phytate-really-problem.html

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 11:02 AM

That was not part of original question.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 12:00 PM

Evelyn, both me and my wife gained weight when we adopted oat meal for 2 months.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 01:36 PM

Anyway, good catch for HarvestPlus, didn't see that one :D

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 11:59 AM

I would suggest cannabis for one. There are thousands of studies showing it promote weight gain. Some of the weight loss medications are made from such conclusion. The fastest way to gain weight is to drink lots of sodas. That is not healthy, so you would likely have to make your own juices from apple, orange etc...

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on November 04, 2011
at 12:56 PM

I looked at the study you cite, and I don't agree at all with your interpretation of it. I'm not going to argue it here. But it's worth following my number one rule when looking at scientific studies: follow the funding. The first one you cited (and then removed) was done by nestlé, and the second receives funding from an organization called HarvestPlus. That wouldn't be a grain company, would it?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 01:33 PM

@gydle, the second one is review, which contains references. You can't imagine stuff when you are not the one that made the facts. You can imagine explanations. I gave review for references.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 01:36 PM

Also, I eat my IP6 from nuts and cocoa - I don't mix those with other foods. So IP6 can not block absorption of anything, that I am getting otherwise.

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on November 04, 2011
at 02:03 PM

@majkinetor - I didn't say I agreed with Lucas' post, just that I thought it was well-documented. ;) The review article you cited is full of references too. SInce I don't have the expertise (or the time) to plow through them, my comment was based on the review article's conclusion, which didn't deny the fact that phytate inhibits mineral absorption (except possibly in soy). I *intuitively* like the idea of the microbiome's role. I'd be interested in reading more on this, if I could only find the time...

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 02:23 PM

Sorry for misinterpretation. I really think omitting nuts from the diet just because IP6 is not good idea given the huge array of other beneficial substances they posses. I completely agree with you about conclusions. I try not to read them a lot.

3
13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on November 04, 2011
at 12:59 PM

Oats, like all grains, are not generally considered paleo. However, I don't think it is the worst thing you can eat--particularly if you find it satiating (some people do, some don't). That said, if you are going to eat to eat them I would soak/ferment them first as per WAPF directives.

3
6e37f170409bc1b100c880c57508c5fd

on November 04, 2011
at 12:03 PM

I just bought oat groats and soaked them with my buckwheat groats to so the phytase in the buckwheat will diminish the phytates in the oats. Then I air dry on dehydrator racks, then run them through the Vita-mix dry blender and voila...flour. My goal is to make oatmeal bread for my husband and son who are not Paleo. If it fails to rise, I will next try a 2 wk long fermented sourdough dough starter as 1/3 of the recipe and the rest will be oats/buckwheat.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on November 05, 2011
at 04:12 PM

Love it! Please keep us posted on how this turns out.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 04, 2011
at 08:06 PM

+1 for creative experimentation! Let us know how it works out.

6e37f170409bc1b100c880c57508c5fd

on November 06, 2011
at 06:40 PM

The buckwheat/oat bread was supplemented with sourdough starter. It was so dense it could double as a Denver Boot! The taste was good but would only serve as toast, never as sandwhich bread. Alot of work for a mediocre product. No return of neuropathy signs yet... I think I'll just stick to playing around with 2 wk old fermented sourdough bread made from sourdouch starter.

3
21b36b3de8ff31b0d41e7f0f4b5c1e03

(1688)

on November 04, 2011
at 11:31 AM

I used to have oat bran for breakfast too before paleo, for the reasons you mention. I now have it just once a week, fermented. Soak in whey and water for 48 hours. I'm telling myself that this makes it a bit more acceptable.

1
Medium avatar

on November 06, 2011
at 07:08 AM

This thread gave me the idea to buy some oats, so I did today and just ate 2 cups (dry) of rolled oats to hit my carb target and that was...unpleasant. Rice is so much more carb-dense and has less water in an edible state. I may do this on occasion, but you have to have a lot of stomach space if you want to eat 100g or so of carbs in one go. I'll report back at some point with how my gut feels after that huge bowl.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 06, 2011
at 07:16 AM

Ew! Unless you eat them with dates (an old family dessert involved mashed dates rolled in oats) that doesn't sound good at all.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on November 06, 2011
at 04:31 PM

I added some raisins and a little honey, but I'd honestly rather eat steamed basmati rice.

1
306aa57660d911781231f8090c2a5619

(3808)

on November 05, 2011
at 01:41 AM

Oats (including oats grown and processed in such a way that they aren't contaminated with gluten) have a protein similar to gluten called avenin. Some people sensitive to gluten are also sensitive to this protein, while others aren't. They're also very carby, of course.

So, if eating oatmeal is important to you, pay attention to how your body reacts.

0
32db5f780cd5344863b7539b37d9ad4b

on July 22, 2013
at 09:32 AM

http://www.harraways.co.nz/healthy-living/hf-gluten.html It would seem that no oats are gluten free, it's just a slightly different form and not yet detectable in current testing!

-2
3f3236d1f951d4b4c25eff387699a905

(554)

on November 04, 2011
at 09:43 AM

Hm sounds like a cheating excuseI used to be addicted to oatmeal. It kept me full for a whole 30min! Why not have something with more nutrition? Oatmeal is basically empty calories. And yes, it's grains.

B3e7d1ab5aeb329fe24cca1de1a0b09c

(5242)

on November 04, 2011
at 10:28 AM

Fibre smibre....

D89511137c1849427593b3ef172578cb

(395)

on November 04, 2011
at 11:24 AM

Id' say rice is more empty calories. But I agree there is better stuff. In either case, it's no cheat, far from it. I'm not adding honey or anything to it. I either eat oats + milk or I cook it, which is what you native speakers call oatmeal I guess. But usually when I ate it I just ate a 40-50g serving of oats + half a liter or a liter of milk followed with a banana or apple. That was my breakfast. It would last me for 4 hours or so, which at the time of my gluten diet was outstanding.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 12:02 PM

*It kept me full for a whole 30min!* The same here....

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 09:49 AM

**Oatmeal is basically empty calories** This is far from truth. It contains number of bioactive phytonutrients - toxic or not - including substantial amount of soluble fiber.

24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on November 04, 2011
at 11:04 AM

Soluble fiber should not be underestimated. It feeds your beneficial gut flora which in turn feeds your gut cells with butyrate.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 04, 2011
at 12:04 PM

Eveylin is right, however, lots of fiber is probably not good idea too. I used to eat 2-3 tbsp a day for a year of various kinds of fiber to threat my hemorrhoids and reduce weight. Neither happened, hemorrhoids were just a little bit better. Low carb diet fixed it in very short period.

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